HOME

 

 Benjamin Franklin Tracy (April 26, 1830 – August 6, 1915)

 

 

Benjamin Franklin Tracy was a United States political figure who served as Secretary of the Navy from 1889 through 1893, during the administration of U.S. President Benjamin Harrison.

 

His family is an old one. It came originally from Ireland and settled in Vermont, removing later to Massachusetts. Towards the end of the eighteenth century, Thomas Tracy, his grandfather, settled in Tioga late in 18th century after moving from New England and settled in New York State, first on Tracy Creek in Broome County and later in Tioga. Benjamin Tracy, his father, was born in 1795 and lived here till his death in 1883. When a lad he served in the war of 1812 and on his return settled down as a farmer in Owego. Benjamin Franklin Tracy was born on April 26th 1830 near Owego, Tioga County, New York.

 

He was brought up on the farm until sixteen years old, attending the common schools and Owego Academy. At the age of nineteen he began the study of the law in the office of Davis & Warner at Owego, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1851. In that year, he married Miss Delinda E. Catlin, daughter of Nathaniel Catlin. They had three children, Emma Eloise who became Mrs. Ferdinand B. Wilmerding, Mary F. and Frank Tracy.

 

He was in active practice in Owego for ten years, being successfully pitted against the veteran lawyers of the county. In November, 1853, he was elected district attorney of Tioga County, being the only candidate on the Whig ticket elected. Three years later he was re-elected for a second term as a Republican. On April 1, 1858, was formed the law firm of Warner, Tracy & Walker, This firm was dissolved in April, 1859, when Governor Walker removed to Chicago, and was succeeded by Warner & Tracy,  which his brother-in-law Isaac Swartwood Catlin joined. In April, 1860 the partners separated. He was active in connection with the formation of the Republican Party in that part of the State, and became one of its local leaders. He claimed to be the founder of the founder of the Republican Party in the state of New York. In 1861, Tracy was elected to the New York Assembly and was made chairman of several of the most important committees.

 

He recruited soldiers to fight for the Union in the Civil War. Authorized July 22, 1862, to raise a regiment in his district, in less than two weeks he reported his regiment full and was appointed colonel in the 109th New York Volunteers and Isaac S. Catlin, as Lieutenant- Colonel. Receiving authority, he also raised another regiment within a month, and would have raised a third, but was not authorized. His regiment was assigned to duty in connection with the defence of Washington, and later in northern Virginia. It afterward formed part of the Ninth Army Corps, and was actively engaged in the Virginia campaign of 1864. At the battle of the Wilderness the brigade was on the extreme right, and took part in some of the heaviest fighting of the day. Under the heavy fire a portion of the line gave way. At this critical moment Colonel Tracy seized the colours and carried his men forward with a charge. This movement resulted in the capture of the works, and for his gallantry he which he was later awarded a medal of honor; he served as commander of the 127th Colored Regiment. Soon after, being prostrated by sickness and sent home, he tendered his resignation, but in the fall re-entered the service as colonel in command of the important post at Elmira, New York, prisoner of war camp, where there were a large number of Confederate prisoners and a camp and draft rendezvous. At the close of the war he resigned, having been commissioned brigadier-general.

ben.bmp

 

 

July 1, 1865, General Tracy entered the law firm of Benedict, Burr & Benedict, of New York. Six months later he removed with his family to Brooklyn, where he continued to reside for many years. October 1, 1866, he was appointed by President Andrew Johnson as United States attorney for the eastern district of New York, and at once declared war against illicit distilling carried on through official connivance. He convicted and sent to prison violators of the law in office and out of office and stamped out the business. In 1868 he was frequently consulted on the subject of revenue legislation, and drafted for the Congressional committee the law relating to distilled spirits, which became the foundation of our present internal revenue system.

 

In 1871, General Tracy he formed a law partnership with his brother in law General Isaac Swartwood Catlin. Absorbed in his practice during the eight years following, he rapidly attained a recognized place among the leaders of the bar. His attention was given both to civil and criminal cases. He was associated with William M. Evarts, Thomas G. Shearman, and John K. Porter in defence of the famous suit brought against Henry Ward Beecher by Theodore Tilton, delivering the opening address on his side, and with Mr. Evarts conducting the cross-examination of the two principal witnesses, Tilton and Moulton. He was also counsel for Judge Charles L. Benedict in the interesting suit of Lange vs. Benedict (73 N. Y. 12) to recover damages for a sentence imposed by Judge Benedict in a trial in the United States Circuit Court, the United States Supreme Court having declared that the judge had exceeded his power. It was held, however, that, being a judge of a court of general jurisdiction, he was not liable for a judicial act in a matter within his jurisdiction, although the act was excessive. Other interesting cases were the contest between Daly and Livingston for the surrogate's office in Brooklyn ; the People vs. the Commissioners of Public Works of Brooklyn, in which he convicted the board and turned them out of office ; the People vs. the Commissioners of Charities, securing a reversal for the commissioners in the Court of Appeals after their conviction in the Supreme Court, and the suit of Kingsley and Keaney, contractors, against the city of Brooklyn, for whom he recovered a hundred thousand dollars. During this period he also appeared for the defence in five murder trials, in four of which he secured an acquittal. At this time, he went into law partnership with his son F. B. Tracy and William C. DeWitt.

 

For many years General Tracy had been active in Republican politics in the city of Brooklyn. In 1880 he was a delegate to the Chicago convention which nominated Garfield for the presidency, being one of the famous "306" who held out to the end for the nomination of General Grant. In 1881 he was the Republican candidate for mayor of Brooklyn, and by his withdrawal in favour of Seth Low insured the inauguration of a reform government. In 1882 he was a candidate for judge of the Supreme Court, second department, on the Folger ticket, and shared in that overwhelming defeat, though receiving 23,000 more votes than the rest of the ticket.

 

On December 8, 1881, he was appointed by Governor Cornell to the seat on the bench of the Court of Appeals made vacant by the resignation of Judge Folger and the assignment of Judge Andrews as chief judge. He occupied this position until succeeded through the election of Chief Judge Ruger, January 1, 1883. His opinions appear in volumes 88, 89, and 98 of the New York reports.

 

In 1889 he was chosen as secretary of the navy in the cabinet of President Benjamin Harrison, his name having been found on both lists of acceptable persons submitted by the rival Republican factions in this State. His success in the administration of the navy department is universally recognized. During his tenure, Tracy called for a powerful “two-ocean navy” that could win battles easily. Taking up the work of naval reconstruction where Secretary Whitney had left it and striking out in new paths he succeeded in giving the United States the nucleus of a navy second to no other in the world in the character of its ships. The three types of ship projected and constructed during his administration, represented by the battle-ship Indiana, the armoured cruiser New York, and the protected cruiser Columbia, are recognized the world over as the most successful types of war vessels at the present day. His administration also witnessed the creation and development of the naval militia, and was characterized by reforms both in the methods of employing labour at navy yards, which had hitherto been the seat of political corruption, and in the purchase of supplies and the methods of account and disbursement of the public funds.   As a member of the cabinet he also boldly enunciated the principles of international law governing the right of asylum in foreign ports in the Barrundia case, and drew up a definition of neutral duties as applied to the commanders of vessels of war during the Chilean revolution. The position finally adopted by this government in reference to the Behring Sea question was first suggested and outlined by him.

 

In February 1890, tragedy struck the family. In a fire at his house in Washington, his wife, his daughter Mary and a maid, Josephine Morell from France, died. His other daughter, the widow Mrs. Wilmerding and her daughter, Miss Alice Wilmerding were seriously injured by jumping from the burning building. Secretary Tracy was found unconscious in the house and barely escaped with his life. Mr. Frank Tracy, the Secretary’s only son was at the farm at Owego, N.Y.

 

At the end of the Harrison administration, following his four years in the cabinet, General Tracy resumed the practice of law, and has been counsel in a number of important cases. He also served as counsel for Venezuela. In 1895 he received the Medal of Honor for action at Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. He was Presidential Elector for New York 1896 and failed candidate for mayor of New York City N.Y. 1897. In 1897, General Tracy was appointed by Governor Morton one of the nine commissioners to draft a charter for the Greater New York, and by his colleagues was unanimously chosen as president of this commission.

 

He was also renowned for breeding trotters on his Tioga county farm.

 

Although he was a member of the Episcopal Church, Pope Pius X gave Bishop Hendrick the white skull cap he was wearing to carry as a gift to General Benjamin F. Tracy, ex-secretary of the Navy. “It is wholly a token of the esteem in which the Popes of Rome hold good citizenship, no matter what the creed of the man” said the Bishop.

 

In his political philosophy he welcomed the coming of women suffrage. He had a pessimistic view of the development of government. “The furious speed with which we are rushing into our new conditions will relolutionize our system before we know it. Every tendency of the time is towards the obliteration of individualism, on which our government was founded and which is the theory of our system, and toward the supervision of the whole business of life, down to the small details, by the government.”

 

Benjamin Franklin Tracy died in 1915 at the house of his daughter Mrs. Wilmerding, as a result of a street accident. He is interred at Green-Wood Cemetery, Brooklyn, N.Y.

 

His brother-in-law was General Catlin. He is the great-grandfather of Frederic René Coudert, Jr. Republican.

 

The USS Tracy (DD-214) was named for him.

 

Ref:

Brooklyn Daily Eagle August 7, 1915

Broome and Tioga County Business Directory 1872-3

Cooling, B. Franklin (1973) Benjamin Franklin Tracy; Father of the Modern American Fighting Navy. Archon Books, CN.

Cooling, Benjamin F. (Collector)

Ms. Coll 42

Research source materials relating to the life and career of Benjamin F. Tracy, Secretary of

the Navy, 1889–1893, for the work entitled Materials include Xeroxed copies, holograph and typewritten notes from the National Archives, Navy Department Archives and Library of Congress relating to Tracy’s youth, education, legal training, Civil War record, post–Civil War career as N.Y. Attorney, Secretary of the Navy including administration of the Navy Yard and reforms, construction of the New Navy, Relations with Congress, Administration of President Benjamin Harrison, Naval War College and A. T. Mahan, Naval Reserve Militia and International Relations with Chile and Caribbean, Bering Sea, Hawaii, and Venezuela, New York, Brooklyn politics and final years, 1832–1915; Xerox copies of Annual Reports of Secretary of Navy and Navy Department, 1889–1892; Reports of the Steel Inspection Board, 1890–1893; Proceedings of the Board of Design of Ships; Copies of General Orders and Circulars, 1887–1893; Typescript of and typescript of dissertation, “B. F. Tracy, Lawyer, Soldier, Secretary of the Navy”; Copies of newspaper clippings; Microfilm of Tracy papers.

17 boxes, 30 reels of microfilm

Naval War College, Newport, R.I http://www.usnwc.edu/getattachment/a03d2e5f-8597-4776-b9a9-4f051facf181/NHCArchivesWEB7-08.pdf

Historical Gazetteer of Tioga County, NY 1785-1888

History of the bench and bar of New York.  New York History Co., 1897-99. 2 v. : fronts., illus., ports.

Selkreg, John H. (1894) Landmarks of Tompkins County, New York. D. Mason & Co., Publisher

The New York Times February 4, 1890

The New York Times August 8, 1915

The New York Times January 20, 1916

 

US Census

 

Speech of Hon. Benjamin F. Tracy, before the Middlesex Club of Boston, Mass. Lincoln's birthday, February 12th, 1898 (1898)

 

Also: Benjamin Franklin Tracy. "This memorial was prepared for the Year Book of the New York County Lawyers' Association."- by/signed: Frank H. Platt. New York? : s.n., 1916, 7pp. The Western Reserve Historical Society

 

 

First Baptist Church of Owego, N.Y.

Marriages

J.R. Tracy and E.M. Havens 1865 Feb. 23

Baptisms

Ellen P Tracy 1868 Jul 5

George Tracy 1869 Mar 14

Funerals

Benjimin Tracy 1883 Feb 2, aged 87, Apalachin Tioga NY

George Tracy 1870 Aug 13, 48 years, Apalachin Tioga NY

George? Tracy 1868 June 7, Daughter of George Tracy 19 years, Owego Tioga NY

Mrs Tracy  1866 Sept 25, 72 years,  Apalachin Tioga NY

 

Children of Pardon Yates and Lydia Tracy are:

i.          G. MORRIS YATES, b. Abt 1810, Apalachin, NY; m. JANE BROWN.

ii.         ELIZA YATES, b. Abt 1813, Apalachin, NY.

Children of Pardon Yates and Elizabeth Earsley are:

iii.        LYDIA YATES, b. Abt 1814, Apalachin, NY; d. 1899; m. SIMEON BROWN.

iv.        TRACY YATES, b. Abt 1817, ?Apalachin, NY; d. February 23, 1875, Apalachin, NY; m. MATILDA STEVENSON.

v.         MARIAH YATES, b. Abt 1818, Apalachin, NY; d. April 06, 1912, Apalachin, NY; m. WARREN BILLS.

vi.        ELEANOR YATES, b. Abt 1820, ?Apalachin, NY; m. JAMES GLANN.

vii.       CATHERINE YATES, b. Abt 1823, Apalachin, NY; d. 1915; m. EDSON EDWARDS.

viii.      JOHNSON E. YATES, b. Abt 1825, Apalachin, NY; d. February 16, 1901, Vestal, NY; m. HANNAH ACKLEY, December 03, 1848, Owego, NY.

ix.        ELIZABETH YATES, b. Abt 1828, Apalachin, NY; d. 1886; m. IRA EDWARDS.

x.         LODOSKY YATES, b. Abt 1832, Apalachin, NY; d. March 09, 1913, Apalachin, NY; m. HARRISON TRACY.

See Tioga Co. NY., Historical Gazetteer 1785-1888, p. 453. Much information on this family has been provided by Taft Family Association member Barbara Hoyes (604 Bay Green Drive, Arnold, MD 21012), a descendant of Johnson E. Yates. Second marriage to Elizabeth Earsley (1789-1888) about 1814.

 

Broome and Tioga County Business Directory 1872-3

Benj. Tracy, (Apalachin,) 8. D. 15, farmer 7.

Harvey J. Tracy, (Apalachin,) S. D. 15, farmer 79.

James R. Tracy, (Owego,) 8. D. 1, sawyer.

W. Harrison Tracy, (Apalachin,) 8. D. 31, farmer 124.

 

Historical Gazetteer of Tioga County, NY 1785-1888 - Directory - Town of Owego, NY

B. F. & Son Tracey,  (Apalachin) (Frank B.), props. Marshland stock farms

Benjamin F. Tracey, (Apalachin) (B. F. Tracey & Son)

Frank B. Tracey,  (Apalachin) (B. F. Tracey & Son)

Frank Y. Tracy, (Apalachin) (Howell & Tracy) h Cross

Harrison Tracy, (Apalachin), farmer 110

Harvey J. Tracy, (Apalachin) stock raising and farmer 105

Howell & Tracy, (Apalachin) (G. W. H. & P. T.) blacksmiths and horseshoers. Main.

Pardon Tracy, (Apalachin) (Howell & Tracy) h Church

 

Landmarks of Tompkins County, New York

Chapter XV The Town of Caroline

The next settlers in the town were Thomas Tracy and his son Benjamin, who in 1797, located near the site of the Charles P. Tobey dwelling. They were from Western Massachusetts originally, but came here from near the present village of Apalachin. After seven or eight years Thomas Tracy sold out to Samuel Rounsvell, who kept bachelor hall here many years, and Rounsvell sold to Walter J. Thomas about 1832. The son returned to their old home near Apalachin and reared a family. General B. F. Tracy, ex-secretary of the navy, is his son. A brother of Thomas Tracy, named Prince Tracy, also settled in Caroline a few years later than Thomas, but after the War of 1812 sold out to the Schoonmaker family and left town.

[Note: there are references to a Prince Tracy in Newburyport, Massachusetts up to 1782 http://www.traceyclann.com/files/Traceys%20of%20Enniscorthy%20and%20Newburyport.htm]

 

Historical Gazetteer of Tioga County, NY 1785-1888

Town of Owego

Thomas Tracy came to this vicinity with his wife and infant son, Benjamin Tracy, and settled near the mouth of Tracy creek Broome county, in 1790. The creek received its name from Mr. Tracy. In 1801, he removed with his family to Caroline, Tompkins county, and thence to the Holland Purchase, near Buffalo. His son Benjamin, several years afterward, returned and settled on the Apalachin creek, where he raised a large family of children, one of whom is Gen. Benjamin F. Tracy, of Brooklyn. Benjamin Tracy died January 31, 1883.

John Jewett, a soldier of the revolution, came from Putnam county in the fall of 1817, and located op the river road a mile east of Apalachin. His son Asa married Bathsheba Wooden, by whom he had four children, viz.: Maurice, of Apalachin, Harry of Owego, Emily, now deceased, and Matilda, wife of Daniel Dodge, of Owego. Mr. Jewett died in 1819. Mrs. Jewett afterward married Benjamin F. Tracy, and had four children, namely, George, now deceased, Harrison and Harvey, of Apalachin, and Benjamin F., of Brooklyn.

Gen. Benjamin F. Tracy was born at Apalachin, in 1829, and is the son of, Benjamin Tracy, of whom mention is made in the history of the settlement of Apalachin. In early life he taught school in Owego, and afterward studied and practiced law. In November, 1853, when but twenty-four years of age, he was elected district attorney of Tioga county, and in 1856, he was re-elected over Gilbert C. Walker, who was subsequently his law partner and afterward governor of Virginia. The law firm of Warner, Tracy & Walker was dissolved a short time previous to the breaking out of the rebellion. In 1862, General Tracy was elected to the assembly, and in the same year he organized the 109th regiment, N.Y. vols., of which he was the colonel. He served with distinction in the battles of the Wilderness and Spottsylvania Court-house, and after returning from the front was placed in command of the rebel prison camp and headquarters for drafted men, in Elmira. At the close of the war he went to Brooklyn, where he resumed the practice of law, October i, 1866, he was appointed United States district attorney for the eastern district of New York by President Johnson, and again January 23, 1871, by President Grant. At the end of his second term he declined reappointment and renewed his law practice, in company with his brother-in-law, General Catlin. He was a member of Plymouth church, and in the celebrated Beecher-Tilton trial was prominent among the counsel for the defence. General Tracy was appointed an associate judge of the court of appeals of, this state, December 9. 1881, in place of Judge Andrews, promoted to chief judge. At the close of his term of office he declined a renomination. He is now out of active politics and devoting his attention to his law practice in Brooklyn.

F. Tracy & Son's Marshland stock farms here, consist of six hundred acres, on the river road, where they carry on very extensively the business of breeding and raising the best blooded trotting horses. They have been engaged in this business since 1878, and have constantly on hand from one hundred to one hundred and twenty- five head of horses, and employ about twenty- five men. As breeders of superior trotters, the Messrs. Tracy have a wide spread reputation, and their system and equipments for raising and breaking trotters are second to none in the country.

 

Melone, Harry Roberts (1932) History of Central New York

Frank B. Tracy. A member of a distinguished family of New York, Frank B. Tracy, of Apalachin, Tioga County, is a representative citizen of the community in which he has spent his entire life. He was born at Owego, February 7, 1856, the son of Gen. Benjamin Franklin and Delinva (Catlin) Tracy.

Gen. Benjamin Franklin Tracy was born April 26, 1830, in the town of Owego, Tioga County, New York, and died August 6, 1915. He received his education in the common schools, and at Owego Free Academy. At the age of nineteen, he began the study of law in the offices of Davis & Warner at Owego and was admit ted to the bar in May, 1851. When only eighteen years old, rep resented his town in county conventions as a "free-soiler." In November, 1853, he ran for District Attorney of Tioga County on the Whig ticket and was elected, and again was elected in 1856. In 1861, Mr. Tracy was elected to the Assembly. He was made chairman of the Railroad Committee and later of a Special Committee on Precedence of Legislation, which virtually directed the course of business of the Legislature. He was also a member of the Judiciary Committee and chairman of the Republican Caucus. Mr. Tracy was designated, July 22, 1862, to raise a regiment in the district which included the counties of Broome, Tioga, and  Tompkins. Early in August he reported the regiment (109th New York Volunteers) full, and was assigned to the command as colonel. He immediately asked for the authority to raise another regiment, which was granted, and on the 22nd of August, just one month after he had entered on the work, he reported his second regiment (137th New York Volunteers) as being also full. He asked permission to raise a third, but this was not granted. August 27, 1862, the 109th New York Volunteers was mustered in, and he was commissioned a colonel of that regiment. Proceed ing to Washington, it was first assigned to duty in connection with the defenses of Washington, and later in northern Virginia. Sub

sequently it was assigned to the Ninth Army Corps. At the battle of the Wilderness on the 6th of May, General Hartranft's brigade was on the extreme right and saw some of the heaviest fighting of the day. Under the hot fire of the enemy, which was sheltered in works, a portion of the advancing line gave way. Colonel Tracy's regiment halted, whereupon the colonel seized the colors and led his men forward. For this act of heroism he was dec orated with a Congressional Medal of Honor. Soon after Colonel Tracy was prostrated by sickness and sent to the hospital, and finally tendered his resignation. And by the autumn he had partially regained his strength, and was commissioned anew as colonel of the 127th United States Volunteers. Later he was as signed to the command of the important post at Elmira, comprising the prison camp and the draft rendezvous. Colonel Tracy remained at this post until the close of the war, when he resigned, having been brevetted Brigadier General. On July 1, 1865, General Tracy entered the law firm of Benedict, Burr and Benedict in New York City. In February, 1866, he removed his family to Brooklyn. October 1, 1866, General Tracy was appointed United States Attorney for the eastern district of New York. During that time he broke up the Whiskey Ring in New York and Kings counties, and was the author of the "Internal Revenue Law," which was passed by Congress, in 1868, putting a tax of $1.10 per gallon on whiskey, which was a law until the passage of the "Volstead Act." In March, 1873, he resigned from that office, and practiced law in Brooklyn and New York. In the latter part of   1881, General Tracy was appointed by Governor Cornell to a seat on the bench of the Court of Appeals made temporarily vacant by the assignment of Judge Andrews as Chief Judge. He served until the end of Judge Andrews' term, January 1, 1883, and after that date resumed his private practice. In 1880 he was a delegate to the Republican convention in Chicago, which nominated President Garfield. In 1889, General Tracy was appointed Secretary of the Navy by President Harrison, being affectionately known as the "Father of the United States Navy." After leaving Washington, D. C, he organized the law firm of Tracy, Boardman and Platt ; later he became chief counsel for Coudert Brothers, international lawyers, with offices in New York City, and so remained until his death in 1915. He had also been the owner of "Marsh land Farm," Town of Owego, Tioga County, where he became prominent and successful as a breeder of thoroughbred trotting horses. He discontinued this hobby in 1889, but continued as owner of the farm. His wife, Delinda (Catlin) Tracy, died in 1890. She was a native of Owego. Her children were : 1. Emma, the widow of Ferdinand Wilmerding, who lives in New York City. 2. Mary, who died in 1890. 3. Frank B., the subject of this sketch. Frank B. Tracy grew up on the family homestead near Owego. He is a graduate of the Brooklyn (New York) schools, Brooklyn Polytechnical School, Adelphia Academy, and was a member of the 1878 class at Yale University. He then entered his father's law office, being admitted to the bar in May, 1877. Mr. Tracy continued in practice at Brooklyn with his father until 1885, and at that time returned to the town of Owego, where he has continued to live.

On March 4, 1905, Mr. Tracy was united in marriage with Miss Elizabeth Cornell, who was born at Owego, August 11, 1883, the daughter of Edwin and Mary (Burt) Cornell. The former, a native of Owego, died in 1932, and the latter died in 1927. She was born in Florida. Two sons were born to Mr. and Mrs. Tracy: 1. Benjamin Franklin, born September 23, 1906, a graduate of Taft School in Connecticut, and Yale University, Bachelor of Arts in 1928, now a law student at Cornell University. 2. Thomas Brodhead, born April 1, 1908, attended United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, Maryland, for two years, and received the degree of M. E., at Cornell University in 1931. He is now identified with the International Business Machine Corporation at Endicott, New York, and lives at the "Old Homestead." Mr. Tracy has always been a Republican. He is an active member of St. Paul's Episcopal Church, of Owego, and holds member ship in the Owego Country Club, Tioga County Farm Bureau, and New York State Bar Association.

 

 

CENSUS RECORDS

 

1850 United States Census

Name: Benjamin Tracy

Residence: Tioga, New York

Age: 40 years

Estimated birth year: 1810

Birthplace: New York

Gender: Male

Film number: 444320

Image number: 00522

Reference number: 4

Dwelling: 1351

Household id: 1390

 

1860 United States Census

Name: Benjn Tracy

Residence: Tioga, New York

Minor civil division: Owego

Age: 64 years

Estimated birth year: 1796

Birthplace: New York

Gender: Male

Page: 114

Family number: 883

Film number: 803867

Digital GS number: 4237094

Image number: 00378

NARA publication number: M653

 

[NOTE: No listing for Benjamin Tracy of Tioga, New York in the 1870 or 1880 United States Census]

 

1870 Census – The Third Ward, Brooklyn, Kings, New York

 

 Name 

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

 Benjamin Tracey 

 Male 

 W 

 40 

 NY 

 Lawyer 

 Delinda Tracey

 Female 

 W 

 41 

 NY 

 Keeping House 

 Emma S. Tracey

 Female

 W

17

 NY

 At school

 Mary F. Tracey 

 Female 

 W 

 16 

 NY 

 At school

 Frank E. Tracey 

 Male 

 W 

 14 

 NY 

 At school 

 Elizabeth Ager 

 Female 

 W 

 25 

 NY 

 Domestic Servant 

 Mary Thompson 

 Female 

 W 

25

 NY 

 Domestic Servant

 

1879 Brooklyn City Directory

Tracy Benj. F. lawyer, 189 Montague, h 148 Montague

Tracy Frank B. lawyer, 189 Montague, h 148 Montague

 

1880 US Census

 

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 Benj. L. TRACY 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 50 

 NY 

 Lawyer 

 CT 

 CT 

 Delinda TRACY 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 52 

 NY 

 Keeps House 

 NJ 

 NY 

 Mary F. TRACY 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 26 

 NY 

  

 NY 

 NY 

 Frank B. TRACY 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 24 

 NY 

 Lawyer 

 NY 

 NY 

 Emma WILMERDING 

 Dau 

 W 

 Female 

 W 

 27 

 NY 

  

 NY 

 NY 

 Alice T. WILMERDING 

 GDau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 3 

 NY 

  

 NY 

 NY 

 Bessie MC CULLOM 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 28 

 IRE 

 Waitress 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Rebecca SCOTT 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 25 

 IRE 

 Cook 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Apollania ENDRES 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 18 

 GER 

 Nurse 

 GER 

 GER 

 B'Rgt. SWEENEY 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 40 

 IRE 

 Laundress 

 IRE 

 IRE 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

1st Ward, Brooklyn, Kings (Brooklyn), New York City-Greater, New York

 

Family History Library Film  

1254840

 

NA Film Number  

T9-0840

 

Page Number  

178D

 

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 Harrison TRACY 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 52 

 NY 

 Farmer 

 NY 

 NY 

 Lodorca TRACY 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 47 

 NY 

 Keeping House 

 NY 

 NJ 

 Benjamin TRACY 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 23 

 NY 

 Works On Farm 

 NY 

 NY 

 George TRACY 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 18 

 NY 

 Works On Farm 

 NY 

 NY 

 Emma TRACY 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 16 

 NY 

 Goes To School 

 NY 

 NY 

 Chester GOODENOW 

 GSon 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 8 

 NY 

 Goes To School 

 NY 

 NY 

 Willie GOODENOW 

 GSon 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 6 

 NY 

 Goes To School 

 NY 

 NY 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

Owego, Tioga, New York

 

Family History Library Film  

1254937

 

NA Film Number  

T9-0937

 

Page Number  

198D

 

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 Harvey TRACY 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 43 

 NY 

 Farmer 

 NY 

 NY 

 Adeline TRACY 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 44 

 NY 

 Keeping House 

 NY 

 NY 

 William TRACY 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 18 

 NY 

 Works On Farm 

 NY 

 NY 

 Dora BROWN 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 4 

 NY 

  

 NY 

 NY 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

Apalachin, Tioga, New York

 

Family History Library Film  

1254937

 

NA Film Number  

T9-0937

 

Page Number  

205A

 

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 Ellen P. TRACY 

 Self 

 W* 

 Female 

 W 

 49 

 NY 

 Keeping House 

 NY 

 NY 

 Sarah E. ASHLEY 

 Other 

 W 

 Female 

 W 

 51 

 NJ 

 Resturant 

 NY 

 NY 

 Elisabeth ASHLEY 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 28 

 NJ 

 At Home 

 NY 

 NY 

 Augusta ASHLEY 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 26 

 NY 

 At Home 

 NY 

 NY 

 Sarah ASHLEY 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 16 

 NY 

  

 NY 

 NY 

 Martin ASHLEY 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 14 

 NY 

 Student 

 NY 

 NY 

 Budd DELANA 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 25 

 NY 

 Clerk In Saloon 

 NY 

 NY 

 Mary E. BRANT 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 50 

 NY 

 Domistic 

 NY 

 NY 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

Owego, Tioga, New York

 

Family History Library Film  

1254937

 

NA Film Number  

T9-0937

 

Page Number  

171A

* Widow of George Tracy

 

1901/02 Club men of New York : their clubs, college alumni ...

TRACY, Hon. BENJ. F., lawyer, 71 Bdwy.—UL, Law, Bar, SubRandD, Met, Ha-Bk, Ox-Bk, Bk-Bk. Waldorf-Astoria.

 

Directory of the living non-graduates 1910 – Yale University

Frank B. Tracy (1874-75, 1878-80) Apalachin, N.Y. [Agr.]

 

 

Last update: 04 January 2014