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 Traceys of Enniscorthy and Newburyport

 

 

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Painting by John Trumbull in 1784-6 of Captain Patrick Tracey, born 1711 in Kilcarberry Hill, Enniscorthy, died 1789 Newburyport Massachusetts North America. His nephew Captain Nicholas Tracy also followed him to America. The Tracy families of Newburyport were major players in the American revolution. Captain Nathaniel Tracy (1751-1796), one of the sons of Patrick Tracey, was the chief financier of the American Revolution.

 

The following are articles on the family:

 

Lee, Thomas Amory (1921) The Tracy Family of Newburyport. Essex Institute Historical Collections 57 (January 1921) L 58.

 

Echo 28 August 1937 (Enniscorthy)

 

Sunday Post 1st August 1937 (Boston)

 

 

Trumbull's Patrick Tracy reveals a young American painter adjusting to the Grand Manner of British portraiture. The subject, a shipowner and merchant from Newburyport, Massachusetts, stands on a shell-strewn beach amid crates and barrels of trade goods. Tracy's weathered face betrays his seventy-some years and typifies the straightforward realism of an American colonial artist. His body, however, with its delicate fingers and slender calves, approaches the idealized proportions advocated by British society portraitists. Trumbull's account book for 1784 explains the contrast between honesty and flattery: "Whole length of Mr. P. Tracy (father of Nat) leaning on an anchor -- head copied." Thus while Patrick remained in America, his son arrived in London on business and lent the artist a portrait of his father from which to work. Trumbull then invented the body according to the sophisticated methods he was acquiring in Europe.

 

 

1. Captain Patrick Tracey was born about 1711 at Kilcarberry Hill, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford and died on 28 February 1789 in Newburyport, aged 78 years (gravestone).  He firstly married

(1) Hannah Carter (b. 9th March 1717/8 d. 27th March 1746), daughter of Vincent Carter and Hannah Gookin, on 23/25 January 1742/43 at Newbury (cf. Putnam 25 Jan 1742/43). Their two children died infancy and the mother died in 27th March 1746, aged 28 years, after four years of married life.

(2) Hannah Gookin (b. 7th February 1723/4 d. 20th August 1756 aged 33 years on gravestone), daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Gookin and Dorothy Cotton, on 25 July 1749 at Newbury.

(3) Mary Dalton (widow) (d. 10th December 1791 bur. 15th December 1791, aged 79 years) on 23 or 24 March 1773, there were no children of this marriage.

12-28-1791 Hampshire Chronicle (Springfield, Massachusetts)

Massachusetts...At Newbury-Port, Mrs Mary Tracy, consort of Patrick Tracy, Esq, late of that town.

Children of Patrick Tracy and Hannah Carter:

1.1Hannah Tracy (b. 20th October 1743 Newbury d. 2nd July 1744)

1.2 Vincent Tracy (b. 4th May 1745 Newbury d. 7th July 1745)

Children of Patrick Tracy and Hannah Gookin:

1.3 Hon. Nathaniel Tracy (b. 11th August 1751 Newbury bur, 21st September 1796). He married Mary Lee (d. Oct. 31, 1819, aged 64 years), daughter of Col. Jeremiah Lee on the 28th February 1775. (Marblehead Records)

1.3.1 Hannah Tracy, born in 25th January 1776, married Lt. William Raymond Lee (or Samuel Lee - Marblehead Records), her second cousin, on 28th April/21st May 1801 and died 14th September 1823 in Boston.

Children of Hannah Tracy and Lt. William Raymond Lee:

Mary Tracy Lee (b. 22 Jul 1804)
William Raymond Lee III (b. 15 Aug 1807, d. 26 Dec 1891)

1.3.2 Martha Lee Tracy (b. 6th July 1777 d. 10th November 1778)

1.3.3 Patrick Tracy (bp. by Rev. Thomas Gary, 17th or 27th February 1780; living 1791; d. 1797)

05-03-1797 Sun (Dover, New Hampshire)

Died. At Hamburg, Mr. Patrick Tracey, son of the late Hon Nathaniel Tracey of Newbury Port.

1.3.4 Nathaniel Tracy (bp. 15th July 1781 Newbury or 27th June 1781 d. before 1788)

1.3.5 Jeremiah Lee Tracy, Lieut U. S. V., (b. 21st December 1782 bapt. 29th December 1782 Newbury or 21st December 1783 d. 16th January 1844, aged 62 years) Unmarried. An able and skilful artillery officer of the War of 1812.

1.3.6 Mary Tracy (b. in the Longfellow House, Cambridge 25th February 1786 d. in Newburyport 23rd December 1809, aged 23 years 10 months) Unmarried.

1.3.7 Louisa (Lucia) Lee Tracy (b. in the Longfellow House Cambridge 25th April 1787 d. 14th/15th May 1869 in Newburyport) Unmarried.

1.3.8 Nathaniel Tracy (b. 25th November 1788 d. before 1790) [Nathaniel, s. Nathaniel and Mary, bp. Aug. 26, 1789 Marblehead]

1.3.9 Nathaniel Tracy (b. 18th March 1790 d. 28th May 1866 West Medford, Dep. Collector of Boston) of Boston married

(1) Mary Wyer (d. Sep 1823 aged 29 years?) of Boston on the 16th June 1818

09-04-1823 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts)

Died. In this city, on Saturday evening last, Mrs Mary, wife of Nathaniel Tracy, esq, aged 29.

(2) Anne Middleton Allen (b. 1798 d. 30th September 1869) in Boston City Hall on 23rd April ????.

Children by his first wife:

1.3.9.1 Elizabeth Wyer Tracy (b. 16th January 1822 d. 27th May 1843, 21 years, consumption)

1.3.9.2 Nathaniel Tracy, Jr., “Gentleman,” (b. 1823; d. 7th December 1843, aged 23 years of consumption)

1.3.9.3 Alby Allen, niece of his second wife, was adopted by him, apparently His second wife also had a nephew, Nathaniel Tracy Allen, and the beautiful Tracy silver services went to the Allen family.

1.3.10 Martha Abby Lee Tracy (b. 27th September 1791 d. before 1819)

1.3.11 Helen Tracy (b. 22nd January 1796 d. in Newburyport 10th November 1865) Unmarried. Was one of the incorporators, October 1857, of the Newburyport Ladies Bethel Society. Included in her inventory (No. 55,540 Essex County Probate) were the family silver, jewellery, books, the Jackson picture, three miniatures, and two Copleys [portraits].

1.4 John Tracy (b. 19th April 1753 Newbury d. 1st May 1815 bur 2nd May 1815, aged 61 years) m. Margaret Laughton (b. 12th May 1755 England d. 9th November 1806, aged 52 years) on the 2nd May 1775.

1.4.1 John Tracy (b.4th March 1776 d. 27th November 1781) (Newburyport gravestone & Vital records).

1.4.2 Henry Laughton Tracy (b. 1st September 1777 d. 26th May 1797 bur. July 5, 1797)

1.4.3 Nathaniel Tracy (b. 19th June 1779 d. 1800 or 1801 lost at sea)

1.4.4 Margaret Tracy (twin) (b. 22nd March 1781 d. 25th June 1842/3, aged 62 years). Unmarried. Her will (No. No. 55,544 Essex County Probate) leaves one-third of her property to her sister Mary Basset, one-third to sister Catherine C. Titcomb, and one-third to the five children of her deceased sister, Elizabeth Loring, of Boston.

1.4.5 Mary Tracy (twin) (b. 22nd March 1781 d. 27th January 1854) m. Christopher Basset, Oct. 19, 1817 Newburyport

1.4.6 Henrietta Tracy (b. 28th June 1782 d. 8th July 1812) m. William Peirce Johnson, Jan. 18, 1807 Newburyport

1.4.7 John Tracy (b. 2nd January 1786 d. in Matanzas Cuba 28th August 1822) (Newburyport gravestone & newspaper reports). [see below]

1.4.8 Elizabeth Farris (or Harris) Tracy* (b. 14th December 1791 d. in Boston 15th August 1825) m. Henry Loring of Boston, Feb. 24, 1818 Newburyport

Feb 1818 The Boston Weekly Messanger

Married...Mr. Henry Loring, merchant of Boston, to Miss Elizabeth F. Tracy of Newburyport.

1.4.9 Catherine De Blois Tracy* (b. 12th November 1794 d. 13th March 1875 widow) m. George Titcomb, May 21, 1819 (or Margaret Tracy, ‘Christian Watchman’ May 29 1819)

* guardian was William Farris, of the two remaining children, who disposed of their 2/6 of the estate of John Tracy on 21st June 1811 (see Resolve of Commonwealth of Massachusetts below)

1.5 Hannah Tracey (b. 23/24/26th April 1755 Newbury d. 28th 1797 Charlestown or Boston), married Hon. Jonathan Jackson of Boston, son of Edward Jackson and Dorothy, on 2 June 1772 Hampton Falls or Newburyport.

Children of Hannah Tracy and Hon. Jonathan Jackson

Robert Jackson (b. 4th March 1773 d. 1800 at seven years of age)

Henry Jackson (b. 12 Jan 1774, d. 8 Dec 1806)
Charles Jackson (b. 31 May 1775, d. 13 Dec 1855)
Hannah Jackson (b. 2 Jul 1776, d. 10 May 1815)
James Jackson (b. 2 Oct 1777, d. 27 Aug 1867)
Sarah Jackson (b. 26 Jun 1779, d. 29 Jan 1809)
Patrick Tracy Jackson (b. 14 Aug 1780, d. 12 Sep 1847)
Harriet Jackson (b. 20 Jan 1782, d. 13 Aug 1849)
Mary Jackson (b. 3 Oct 1783/1788, d. 1 Jun 1860)

 

Ref:

Lee, Thomas Amory (1921) The Tracy Family of Newburyport. Essex Institute Historical Collections 57 (January 1921) L 58.

Catherine Drinker Bowen, Yankee from Olympus, p.80.

Elizabeth Cabot Putnam & James Jackson Putnam, editors (1907) The Hon. Jonathan Jackson and Hannah (Tracy) Jackson, Their Ancestors and Descendants. P.25,28. Privately published.

George Norbury MacKenzie, Colonial families of the United States, Vol. V p. 352-3

The Pickering Genealogy, p. 216.

Titcomb, Sarah Elizabeth (1882) Early New England People: Some Account of the Ellis,Pemberton,Willard ... - Page 175

Vital Records Newport & Newburyport

 

1. Robert Tracy, farmer of County Wexford (brother of Captain Patrick Tracy above) died about December 1767

1.1 Katherine Tracy of Wexford married Thomas Devereux (born about 1725, died Ballymore, Wexford May 12th 1803 aged 78)

1.2 Captain Nicholas Tracy was born in 1726 in Co. Wexford. He married Miriam Titcomb [nee Willcomb???] (b. 20th February 1732/1733 d. 28th October 1810, aged 78 years), daughter of Col. Moses Titcomb and Miriam Currier, in 1751. Nicholas Tracy died on 23rd May 1787 in Newburyport, aged 61 years (gravestone & Vital records).

April 30 [1751] Nicholas Tracey and Mrs. Merium Titcomb, both of Newbury (History of Hampton Falls, N.H. Volume 1)

Children of Nicholas Tracy and Miriam Titcomb.

1.1.1 Robert Tracy (b. 2/28th August 1752 Newbury d. 16th December 1804, aged 53 years) Unmarried.
1.1.2 Elizabeth Tracey (b. 13th January 1771 Newburyport, d. 20th December 1772 or bur Oct. 23, 1772)
1.1.3 Nicholas Tracy (b. 24th July 1773, d. 26th or 27th July 1811, aged 38 years)
He married, 19th March 1795, Lydia St. Barbe, daughter of Captain Wyatt St. Barbe. She died in Boston 2nd December 1832. Mrs. Lydia St. Barbe Tracy m. John Muzzy, Esq. of Portland, int. Sept. 9, 1821.

10-09-1821 The Portland Gazette (Portland, Maine)

Married. In this town, John Muzzy, Esq. of this place, to Mrs Lydia St. Barbe Tracey, of Newburyport.

1.1.3.1 Elizabeth Tracy (b. 9th February 1796; d. in Louisville, Ky., 1st June 1851) may have m. Charles Muzzy of Portland, Oct. 22, 1818 Newburyport

1.1.3.2 Nicholas Tracy (b.19th June 1797 or 17Th June 1798 d. 10th or 12th April 1798, aged 10 months)

1.1.3.3 Eleanor St. Barbe Tracy (b.13th June 1799 d. 17th June 1889) m. Joseph Eustis, jr. of Boston, Oct. 2, 1820, mother of William Tracy Eustis of the New England Historic-Genealogical Society.

October 12, 1820 Boston Weekly Messenger

Married. In Newburyport, Mr Joseph Eustis, jr, of Boston, to Miss Eleanor St. Barbe Tracy, daughter of the late Mr. Nicholas Tracy.

1.1.3.4 Henrietta Louis Tracy (b. 5th September 1802 d. in Sudbury, Mass., 19th March 1878)

1.1.3.5 Harriet Maria Tracy (b. 5th July 1805 d. in Portland, Me., 19th January 1879)

1.3 Matthew Tracy of Wexford (may have died after 1787)

1.4 John Tracy of Wexford (may have died after 1787)

1.5 James Tracy of Wexford, perhaps Captain James Tracy, died perhaps October 1777

1.6 Mary Tracy of Wexford married John Nevil

1.7 Martin Tracy, youngest son, of Killcarberry Wexford

 

Ref:

Lee, Thomas Amory (1921) The Tracy Family of Newburyport. Essex Institute Historical Collections 57 (January 1921) L 58.

Sarah Elizabeth Titcomb, Early New England People, p. 181.

The Pickering Genealogy, p. 216, 218

Vital Records Newport & Newburyport

8 February 1777 Freemans Journal (Ireland) - Extract of a letter from Plymouth, Jan 3?

 

Other Records by date

 

Mary Tracy (b. 04 Jan 1707 Colchester, Essex, England) m. Benjamin Wentworth 1753 Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts (LDS)

 

April 29 [1740] Charles Tracy and Mrs. Hannah Smith, both of Portsmouth; He formerly of Biddeford in England; She the widow of Mr. Smith of Durham (History of Hampton Falls, N.H. Volume 1)

 

September 2 [1745] Eliphalet Kiiborn and Mrs. Jane Tracey, both of Eowley (History of Hampton Falls, N.H. Volume 1)

 

Patrick Tracy (b. 1750?) Newburyport. Private, 1773 & 1775.

 

Prince Trac(e)y/Trasy (b. 1760?) Private, Newburyport muster 1780 (& 1777?)

 

Thomas Tracey and Ann ???

James bp. July 10, 1774. Newburyport

 

Cupid Tracy m. Sylvia Jackson 16 Nov 1780 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts (LDS)

 

Apropo Tracy (d. May 6, 1810 aged about 75 years) m. Dinah Hill (d. Dinah Tracy, wid. Appropo, Oct. 25, 1828 Newburyport) 23 Dec 1783 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts (LDS) (obituary Newburyport Herald May 11 1810)

“When the idea began to spread that even men of dark skins might love the rights of freedom, he [Patrick Tracy] responded by setting free a negro and his wife, well known in Newburyport, who had lived long as trusted servants in his household, and making a provision in his will securing to them a home and maintenance for the remainder of their days.” James Jackson Putnam. [See will of Patrick Tracy]

 

Lois Tracy (b. about 1781 Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts) m. Daniel Grissell Goodhue (LDS)

 

Henrietta Tracy (b. about 1799 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts) m. George Brooks 16 Nov 1825 (LDS)

 
Thomas Tracy (d. 11 April 1806) m. Eliza Eaton (d. 17 December 1806) 4 Nov 1804 Marblehead, Essex, Massachusetts 
Mary Elizabeth Tracy b. circa December 1805 [Mary Elizabeth, d. Thomas and Elizabeth, bp. Jan. 31, 1808 Marblehead]
 

Hannah Lillie Tracy (b. 11 Jan 1824 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts) m. Joseph Coffin 16 Nov 1843 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts (LDS)

 

Thomas Tracy, Rev. of Biddeford m. Ann Bromfield, int. May 5, 1824 Newburyport [d. 1872 see below]

June 9 [1824] Rev. Thomas Tracy of Biddeford, Me., and Ann Bromfield of Newburyport (History of Hampton Falls, N.H. Volume 1)

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, 1872, Death, 247, 289

Ann Tracy, Newburyport, 1856, Death, 102, 156 [Ann Bromfield died 9 Sep 1856 ref ‘The Bromfield Family’ in The New England Historical and Genealogical Register,: Volume 26]

 

11-08-1856 Albany Evening Journal (NY) 

Handsome Donations - Mrs Tracey, of Newburyport, recently deceased, left in her will the sum of $10,000, the interest of which was to be given to an aged lady in Boston during her lifetime. At her decease, the funds are to be appropriated to the Society for the relief of aged females.

 

Nicholas Tracy, s/o Samuel & Hannah, d. 31 Dec 1851, ae 2-10-6 (Vital Statistics of Seabrook, New Hampshire, 1768-1903)

 

Ellen Tracy (d. of Michael, 25 years) m. Edward Nogle [Nagle] (s. of Daniel, 26 years, labourer) 09 Feb 1854 Newburyport, Massachusetts (by James O Donnell Cath Priest City of Laurence)

 

Patrick Tracy (s. of David & Mary, 30 years, resides Laurence, labourer, b. Ireland) m. Margret Kibby (d. of Ed  & Mary, 20 years, resides Laurence, b. Ireland)  30 Oct 1854 Newburyport, Massachusetts  (by James O Donnell Cath Priest, City of Laurence)

 

Mary Ann Tracy, Newburyport, 1860, Marriage, 135, 227

Mary Ann Trasey, 20?, of West Newbury, b. Ireland, 2nd marriage (d. of James & Mercy Tracy)  m. James Fee, 44, of West Newbury, farmer, b. Ireland, 2nd marriage (s. of Morgan & Nancy Fee) 05 Jul 1860 Newburyport, Massachusetts  
 

Michael Tracy, Newburyport, 1868, Marriage, 208, 251

Michael Tracy, 29,  of Newburyport, labourer, b. Ireland (s. of Thos. Tracy & Margaret Tracy) m. Alice Maloney, 35, of Newburyport, b. Ireland (d. of Edmund Maloney & Catherine Maloney) 02 Aug 1868 Newburyport, Massachusetts. Catholic priest 
 

Emeline Tracy, Newburyport, 1884, Marriage, 352, 318

Emeline Tracy, 23, of Rowley, b. Shipharbour N.S., (d. of Jacob Tracy & Mary E. Tracy)  m. Charles A. Pickard, 34,  of Rowley, shoemaker, b. Georgetown (s. of Charles Pickard & Elizabeth (Clark) Pickard) 27 Sep 1884 Newburyport, Massachusetts  
 
Traceys from Dunmore, Co. Galway
 

Patrick Tracy, 21, shoemaker b. Ireland (s. of Patrick & Bridget Tracy) [Patrick Tracy & Bridget Grady of Dunmore Co. Galway] m. Kate Freeman, 28, b. Ireland (d. of Samuel & Kate Freeman) 04 Apr 1869 Newburyport, Massachusetts by Catholic Pastor. Patrick Tracy, Newburyport, 1869, Marriage, 217, 251. Pat Tracy d. 16 Aug 1878 Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts by drowning. Catherine Freeman Tracy  died 17 Aug 1918 Templeton, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States, aged 76, b. Jun 2 1847 Co. Wexford d. of Samuel Freeman & Catherine Franey both b. Co. Wexford.

Patrick Tracey & Catherine Freeman

Patrick Tracy, b. 9 May 1870 Newburyport, father shoemaker, both parents b. Ireland. Birth, 223, 273. Patrick S. Tracy died 16 Feb 1901 Lowell Massachusetts, aged 30, single, Weaver, disease of heart, buried Haverhill (b. Newburyport  s. of Patrick Tracy & Kate Freeman, both b. Ireland) 

Robert Emmett Tracy, b. March 6 1872 Newburyport, father shoemaker, both parents b. Ireland. - Robert E. Tracy, Newburyport, 1872, Death, 247, 287 (22nd March 1872 s. of Patrick & Catherine)

Katie Tracey b. 01 Jun 1873 Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts (LDS) Katie Tracey, Newburyport, 1873, Birth, 250, 283

Hugh S. Tracy, 25, single, b. Haverhill, spinner, of "Hyde Park" (s. of Patrick Tracy & Kate Freeman m. Ellen G. Bergin, 18, single, b. Baldwinsville, of "Hyde Park"  (d. of Michael Bergin & Alice Mc Graty)  15 Jun 1901 Boston, Massachusetts    

Winifred A. Tracy b. 15 Sep 1877 Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts, USA 

 

Daniel Tracy d. 28 Dec 1903 Haverhill, Massachusetts, of 18 Emerson St, 54 years, railroad accident,  Married, Occupation: Laster, Burial Date: 30 Dec 1903 St. James  (s. of Patrick Tracy & Bridget Grady) Informant: Mrs Mouis? W. Callaghan, 8 School St Newburyport

Ellen Rogers Tracy  died 31 Mar 1905 Haverhill, Massachusetts, 57 years, widow, housekeeper, b. Ireland d. of William Rogers, Residence: 132 Franklin Street, Merrimac, Massachusetts  Buried 01 Apr 1905 St. James Cemetery. Spouse's Name: Daniel Tracy 

 

Winifred Tracy, 19, of Newburyport, b. Galway Ireland, (d. Patrick Tracy  & Bridget Tracy) [Bridget Grady] m. Patrick W. Callahan, 22,  of Newburyport, b. Boston Mas, Camt-maker, (s. of  Cornelius Callahan & Margaret Callahan) 13 May 1875  Newburyport, Massachusetts 

 

Mary Tracy, 22, of Newburyport, b. Ireland (d. of Patrick Tracy & Ellen Tracy) [Bridget Grady] m. Maurice Jr. Welch, 24, of Newburyport, Barber, b. Newburyport  (s. of Maurice Welch  & Mary Welch) 26 Nov 1876  Newburyport, Massachusetts 

 

Delia Tracey,  21, of Newburyport, b. Co. Galway Ire, (d. of Bartholemew  & Kate Tracey) [Bartholemew Tracey & Kate Tracey of Dunmore? Co. Galway] m. Daniel Manning, 25, of Newburyport, Miner, b. Co. Kerry Ire (s. of Owen  & Kate Manning)  11 Jun 1878  Newburyport, Massachusetts 

 

Mary Jane Tracy, 22, domestic, of Newburyport, b. Ireland  (d. of Bartholomew Tracy & Catherine Tracy)  m. Michael Coffill, 27,  ship carpenter, of Newburyport, b. Bath M? (s. of John Coffill  & Ann (Cartin) Coffill)  05 May 1884  Newburyport, Massachusetts 

 

Sabina Tracy, Newburyport, 1886, Marriage, 370, 326

La...Ina [Sabina] Tracy, 20, of Newburyport, domestic, b. Co. Galway Ire (d. of  Bartley  & Catherine Tracy)  m. John J. Keleher, 20, of Newburyport, Harnin? maker, b. Co. Cork Ire (s. of John & N...[Nora] Keleher)  23 Nov 1886 Newburyport, Massachusetts 

 

Ref:

Lee, Thomas Amory (1921) The Tracy Family of Newburyport. Essex Institute Historical Collections 57 (January 1921) L 58.

Vital Records Newport & Newburyport

 

Patrick Tracy of Newburyport’s brass-covered portable liquor chest with eight clear glass bottles, brass panels with punched heart, flower and paisley decoration, iron strapwork borders and corners, interior with sectional dividers with later green paint, iron carrying handles and hand made iron lock, interior of lid with plastic liner, top with oval brass plaque "Patrick Tracy/Newburyport", British or Continental, late 18th/early 19th century, 9-3/4 x 14-3/4 x 12 in., [back with extensive rust and losses, dividers possibly later;] eight bottles, threaded tops with metal caps (probably pewter), lids and stoppers marked with crowned rose with "FS", 8-1/8 in., [four bottles lacking tops, one with large crack, one with 1 in. shallow chip, other scattered chips, some with damaged lids and threads, some with interior stains, other scattered chips and losses.] Provenance: Deaccessioned from MESDA and Old Salem to benefit the Acquisition Fund.

 

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Captain Patrick Tracey was born in 1711 in Kilcarberry, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford but was orphaned early. Although in the Paine ancestry, it states that he left with "with the consent of his parents" [their quoatation marks]. His guardian, according to family tradition, had robbed him of his estate and in 1730, at the age of 19 years he sailed to Boston. He may have been the Patrick Tracy admitted to the Boston Charitable Irish Society in 1737. He subsequently went to Newbury, where he became a mariner. He made many journeys to the West Indies and quickly became proficient in navigation. He became a master mariner, ship-owner and an importing and exporting merchant. In 1738, Patrick Tracy and other merchants and sea captains, suggested the building of a new church for the accommodation of the inhabitants living near the centre of the town. He was a devout man and vestryman of Saint Paul’s Episcopalian Church (1743-8) and held two pews (35 and 49), The other members of the family from Ireland appear to have been Roman Catholics. He was a subscriber to Chauncy’s Seasonable thoughts on the state of religion in New-England, printed in Boston in 1743. [Mr. P. Tracey of Newbury]

 

The following letter, written to Mr. Jacob Wendell before the first marriage, is now in the possession of Mr. Ernest Jackson, great-great-grandson of the writer.

 

Newberry, Aprill 26th, 1742.

Honoured Sr., — This will serve to acquaint ye that am now under Sail, it being the first Opportunity Since Iv'e been ready. Sr. Youv'e often been pleased to banter me for not marrying which state I never have been fixed in mind for till come to Newberry where have plac'd my affections for Miss Hannah Carter but being to them an intire stranger can't Expect to prevail except recomended by some good friend which I hope Ye are. I expect Madam Kent [mother of Hannah Carter by a previous marriage] will enquire of ye into it. I hope Sr you'l do me what favor ye can in that Case.

Sr please to excuse this in hast from Your Much Oblig'd And Humble Servant

Patrick Tracy.

P. S. Sr. please to keep ye above Relation a Secret to all unconcern'd and Youl oblige Your Humble Servant,

Patrick Tracy.

 

In Caledonian Mercury 16 December 1758, ships from Lloyd's list, there is “The Meryon, Tracey from Newberry for St. Eustatia” and The Scots Magazine, Volume 21 in the captures for December 1758, by the French, there is the following listing “The Meryon, Tracy, from Newbery for St Euslatia”.

 

In May 1760, he was part of a scheme of a lottery organised to rise “a sum of money for the building and maintaining a bridge over the River Parker, in the Town of Newbury, at the Place called Old Town Ferry (in pursuance of an Act of the General Court, passed in April 1760). Wherein Daniel Farnham, Caleb Cushing, Joseph Gerrish, William Atkins, Esq., and Mr. Patrick Tracy, Merchant, (or any three of them) are appointed Managers. The acting Managers are sworn to the faithful Performance of their Trust.”

 

At the 10th June 1763 session of the general court at Newbury, 206 of the “water side people” petitioned to incorporate a town for themselves i.e. Newburyport. This was signed by William Atkins, Daniel Farnham, Michael Dalton, Thomas Woodbridge and Patrick Tracy. On February 8, 1764, Capt Patrick Tracy was made an officer of Newburyport. In 1765, he was one of the ppetitioners to the House of Representatives of Massachusetts, regarding the unjust and illegal Seizures of their Vessels at New-Providence.

 

He was also a firm supporter of education. After the disastrous fire at Harvard in 1n 1764, he donated many books and money. It is said that in 1766 that there was only three shops for English goods in Newburyport, one of which belonged to Patrick Tracy. He built a large fleet of vessels and had many and wide interests.

 

At a meeting of the inhabitants of Newburyport, held December 17, 1767, a committee including Capt. Patrick Tracy, was appointed to prepare an answer to a letter from the selectmen of Boston. On April 2, 1771, the General Court appointed a committee, including Capt. Patrick Tracy, to select a suitable place to build lighthouses. In 1772, he was appointed justice of the peace, an important of office at the time. In 1773, a committee was appointed by the town of Newburyport to obtain liberty to build a pier or piers on the sunken rocks in Merrimack river.

 

John Adams, in his diary of Sunday June 23rd 1771, states that "After Meeting rode to Newbury, and visited Brother Lowell, Brother Farnham, and then went and supped with Mr. Jonathan Jackson, in Company with Capt. [Patrick?] Tracy, Mr. Hooper, Mr. Williams, Mr. Frasier and Brother Lowell. Then went and lodged with Lowell.”

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Patrick Tracy, 1754, by John Greewood

 

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Plaque to Patrick Tracy in Newburyport

 

According to Shattuck biography, he was appointed justice of the peace in 1772, and became a town leader in the movement for independence.

 

On 29th January 1774, he with Robert and Nicholas Tracy petitioned the Selectmen to send delegates to the Continental Congress called to assemble at Philadelphia. He was later named a member of the committee to prepare instructions to the delegates. On 23rd September 1774, he and Captain Nicholas Tracy were leading members of the Essex Committee of Safety. He directed preparations for warfare and for home protection and many of the privateers flew his flag. The royal governor and the army and navy heads at Boston were incensed at the “Irishman Tracy” and directed efforts against him.

 

There were 110 vessels in the Tracy Fleet, worth approximately 3 million dollars. There were 23 Tracy privateers with 340 guns and 2,800 men. Tracy ships captured 120 British vessels. Tracy funds flowed freely in loans to the government, and food and clothing poured into the navy.

 

On the 21st October 1778 the estate of John Lowell was conveyed to Patrick Tracy and later to John Tracy. The fine mansion which Judge Lowell built for himself was sold to Patrick Tracy for £10,000, when he removed to Boston. In 1782 Mr. John Tracy entertained the Marquis de Chastellux and other distinguished Frenchmen in this house.

 

Patrick Tracey’s will is an interesting document (No. 27,291 Essex County Probate). At his death in 1789, his estate was valued at £3,739. 1s. 9½d., four mansion houses and 212 ounces of silver plate, 18 framed pictures, 3 “family pictures”, i.e. portraits. Besides his three children, the only other major recipient was his ‘faithful black man Apropos’, who was given for his lifetime a house, garden and six pounds annually. Apropos had been is slave and this was an abolitionist act that was much commented on at the time. In the 1790 census Apropo was listed as living in Newburyport (Aprepo Tracy, Newburyport #090). He also held land in Exeter, New Hamshire, (a house with half an acre, five acres on the main road and eighty acres at the Neck) which was sold in 1791 by the executor Dudley Atkins Tyng. In April 1813, Dudley Atkins Tyng had the will registered in Dover, New Hampshire, where Patrick Tracy had real estate.

 

April 8, 1791, two years after the death of Patrick Tracy, the land upon which Apropos lived, with about eleven and one-half acres adjoining, was conveyed by Thomas Russell to Theophilus Parsons "reserving to the said Apropos the right to use and occupy the said house and about one-half acre of land." [Essex Deeds, book 154, p. 178j.]

 

Patrick Tracy’s mourning rings and portrait were possessed by Patrick Tracy Jackson. Another portrait was in the possession of the family another descendant Mrs. Frederick C. Shattuck.

 

The following is a description of the portraits from the Massachusetts Historical Society, 1878:

 

Patrick Tracy. He was born in 1711, and died Feb. 23, 1789. The picture is seven feet six inches long by four feet three inches wide. It represents Mr. Tracy, who was a celebrated merchant of his time, as standing on a wharf, his left hand resting on an anchor. His dress is of a drab cloth, and he wears a white wig. There is some doubt whether this picture was painted by Blackburn or by Copley.

 

It is in the possession of a descendant, Mr. Patrick Tracy Jackson, of Boston.

 

Patrick Tracy. This picture, a half-length, is thirty-six inches by twenty-seven. Mr. Tracy was born near Dublin, Ireland, in 1711. He married : 1st, Hannah Carter ; 2d, Hannah Gookin, whose portrait is described below ; and, 3d, the widow of Tristram Dalton. He died Feb. 28, 1789. He wears a curled wig, hanging to the shoulder, a loose cravat tucked behind the vest, a lead-colored coat with wide cuffs and large ruffles, and a black vest. He is represented seated be hind a table, upon which is placed a standish and small candlestick, pen in hand. The other hand is thrust into the open vest, through which the shirt-ruffle is seen. The date of the picture is about 1760.

 

Mrs. Patrick Tracy. The second wife of Mr. Tracy was Hannah, daughter of the Rev. Nathaniel Gookin, of Hampton, N. H. She was born Feb. 7, 1724. She is painted seated in a rocky recess with a background of landscape with three Lombardy poplars. She holds a wreath of flowers, which tradition says the artist was forced to substitute for a baby whose picture he did not succeed in drawing. She wears a brown silk dress, cut in a point at the neck, with elbow sleeves and embroidered ruffles. Her black hair is drawn away from the forehead and hangs in long curls down her neck. This picture is a half-length, and measures thirty-six inches by twenty-seven. It was painted about 1754.

 

These portraits are owned by Colonel Henry Lee, of Boston.

 

03-11-1789 The Hampshire Chronicle (Springfield, Massachusetts)

Died - At Newbury Port, Patrick Tracy, Esq, aged 78; for many years an eminent merchant in that part of the country.

 

His third wife, Mary Dalton (nee Little), was the widow of Michael Dalton (1709-1770) married Captain Patrick Tracy in March 1773, and died Dec. 10, 1791, aged seventy-eight. She was buried by the side of her first husband in St. Paul's churchyard.

http://www.daltondatabank.org/DDBIndex/UpdatesDB/_DDB_Changes_fulltext.php?field=Change&key1=51

 

Another Patrick Tracy of Newburyport signed as a private in Captain Perkins' company on the 19th May 1775, served at Bunker Hill and later in the Canada expedition. Lee states that “It is barely possible that he may have been a slave”. The following is his war record:

 

Patrick Tracy, Newburyport. Private, Capt. Timothy Barnard's co. Col. Moses Little's (17th) regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1773; enlisted May 9, 1775; service, 12 weeks; also, company return endorsed " Oct 9 1775; " age, 25 yrs.; the word " Canada " appears after name.

 

The following is an extract from Paul Lunt’s Book Newburyport, May 10 1775 – A journal of Travels from Newburyport to Cambridge:
 
Monday, 7th [August? 1775]. - Very cool for the season. Sat upon court-martial to try Patrick Tracy for disobedience of orders, found him guilty; judgment brought in against him to ride the wooden horse twenty minutes. 
Wednesday, 9th. - Patrick Tracy rode the wooden horse

 

In "The invasion of Canada in 1775" by Edwin Martin Stone, a Patrick Tracey is listed as being in Captain Simeon Thayer Company and is stated having being killed in December 1775.

 
 

There is a Prince Trac(e)y/Trasy listed in the muster roll for Newburyport in 1780. There is also a Prince Tracey listed for 1777 who may be the same person. The following is the war record:

 

Prince Tracey. Private, Capt. Samuel Merriman's co., Col. Phineas "Wright's y- (6th Hampshire Co.) regt.; enlisted Oct. 3, 1777; discharged Oct. 18, 1777; service, 22 days, in Northern department, including 7 days (140 miles) travel home. Roll attested at Northfield.

 

Prince Trac(e)y/Trasy. Private, Return of men raised in Essex Co. for Continental service, agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780; engaged for town of Newburyport; engaged April 9, 1781; Capt. Jeremiah Miller's co. Col. Joseph Vose's (1st) regt.; muster rolls for April and May, 1781, dated West Point; enlisted April 9, 1781; enlistment, 3 years; reported at the Lines in May, 1781; also, muster / rolls for June and July, 1781, dated Phillipsburgh; reported on command with Col. Scammel; also, muster rolls for Aug.-Nov., 1781; muster rolls for Jan. and Feb., 1782, dated York Huts; also, return of recruits sent by the state of Massachusetts as portion of her quota of the Continental Army subsequent to Jan. 1, 1781, who were reported as unfit for duty; 1st Mass. regt.; age, 20 yrs. 6 mos.; stature, 5 ft. 4 in.; engaged for town of Newburyport; term, 3 years; reported afflicted with blindness and dropsy.

 

[Note: there is a reference to a Prince Tracy from Massachusetts moving to Caroline, New York http://www.traceyclann.com/files/Benjamin%20Franklin%20Tracy.htm]

 

 

Captain Nicholas Tracy came to Newburyport at a very early age, and was a mariner. For several years he was employed as an ordinary seaman on vessels plying out of New England ports. In 1750, he was commander of a vessel in which he made several profitable voyages. In due course he became a master mariner, and made profitable voyages to the West Indies and Europe. He presently became an importing merchant, and owned the Upper Long Wharf, with its warehouses, etc. His mansion house was on the northwest corner of State and High streets. On the 19 October 1754 the Halifax Gazette states that Captain Nicholas Tracey from Salem outward bound for Newfoundland. He was in the Alarm List of the foot company in Newbury, of which Joseph Coffin was captain, 13th July 1757. In 1769, Joseph Willcomb sold to his brother-in-law, Capt. Nicholas Tracy, mariner, of Newburyport, a tract of land of about twelve acres, and a year later also sold to him his wife's third of the estate of Nathaniel Warner, being a house and land in Newburyport. In 1771, he was a warden of the Episcopal Church at Newbury. In 1774 he signed a petition to the selectmen to send delegates to the old Continental Congress of September 1774. On 15th June 1774, he was on the committee to correspond with the Committee of Safety of Boston, and was a member of the Committee of Safety.

Nicholas Tracy signature.jpg

 

His will (No. 27,968 Essex County Probate), dated 17th January 1787, was proved 13th June 1787. He bequeathed to his wife Merriam one-third of the dwelling house on the northwest side of the head of Fifth street for life, and two-thirds for widowhood, also one-third of all other real estate to son Robert, the house on the northwest side of Queen street for life; and all the residue of real estate and personal estate in remainder and reversion to son Nicholas, but if he die under 21, then to his brothers Matthew Tracy and John Tracy and his sister Catherine Devereux, all of the Kingdom of Ireland. This will proves Captain Nicholas to have been a son of Robert Tracy of Wexford. His wife, Captain Joseph Noyes, mariner, and Samuel Tufts, merchant, are named as executors. His estate was valued at over £9,700, including the mansion house, store, two dwelling houses, and eighteen and one-half rights in Queen Wharf, a silver watch, plate and glass, a wall pew in Rev. Mr. Gary's meeting house, money in hand £1,852. 19s. 5¾d, 37 notes against John Tracy, Nathaniel Tracy, Thomas Tracy, Nicholas Pike, etc.

 

His widow Miriam was appointed guardian (No. 27,969 Essex County Probate) of their son, Nicholas Tracy, a minor over 14 years, on 27th August 1787, Joseph Noyes, mariner, and Andrew Frothingham, merchant, being her sureties. Her estate (No. 27,964 Essex County Probate) was valued at $5,578.21. In the 1790 census, she is listed as living in Newburyport (Merriam Tracy, Newburyport #089).

 

1788 The Town and country magazine

American News...Deaths

...4 jan...Capt Tracey, in the Levant trade...

1787 The Gentleman's magazine, Volume 57, Part 2

On his way to the South of France, - Tracey, esq; some time since a captain in the Levant Trade.

 

 

Honourable Nathaniel Tracy was born in 1751, eldest son of the prominent merchant, Captain Patrick Tracey and Hannah Gookin. Nathaniel graduated from the Boston Public Latin School in 1760 and Harvard with the class of 1769. After an additional year at Yale returned to Newburyport to enter his father's mercantile house and then travelled abroad. In 1773, he was given the honorary degree of A.M. by the College of New Jersey, now Princeton University. He was probably a collector of books as an early American bookplate may be attributed to him. In 1775, “Mr. Nathaniel Tracey, Newbury-Port, 2 Copies, Mr. John Tracy, Newbury Port, Mr. Robert Tracey, ditto” were subscribers to Bernard Romans’s ‘A concise natural history of East and West Florida’.

 

In 1774?, along with his brother John, Nathaniel formed a partnership with Jonathan Jackson, who had worked for their father and had married their sister Hannah three years before.

 

In the Essex Gazette, published in Salem, Mass., May 19, 1772, Jackson, Tracy & Tracy advertised powder, by the barrel, “and a few firkins of choice butter for sale” at their place of business near the ferry way.

 

The firm of Jackson, Tracy & Tracy enjoyed considerable success in the short time remaining before the outbreak of hostilities in 1775, and during the war fitted out a large number of privateers, only a few of which showed any long-run profit. Their partnership was dissolved in 1777, after which all three men suffered severe financial losses. Nathaniel and his brother John engaged in business again in Newburyport, still holding several ships including Cato, Success, and Port Packet. A Spanish report names the pretended owners of the Britannia as “Trhacey et Tracey” the French version has “Jrhacey et Fracey” and the English as Jyhacey et Fracey”. In naming the owner, Prize Master John Allen apparently ment the firm of Nathaniel Tracy and John Tracy.

 

The Tracys were travelling to Europe and presumably had contact with Wexford. It was Nathaniel Tracy who forwarded letters from Wexford to Commodore John Barry [father of the American Navy], regarding his relatives living there:

 

“Letters from Ireland - the first definite word from his family since the outbreak of war were awaiting Barry when he reached New London, on July 20. Their exact contents we cannot be sure of, but, apparently, they contained word of the death of his parents, and the destitute situation of his two sisters, Margaret Howlin and Eleanor Hayes, and their little families.

"They are really very moving to me," the Captain wrote to Nathaniel Tracy, at Boston, who had forwarded the letters. He asked Tracy to arrange for payment of twenty guineas annually to the unfortunates, and suggested the money be cleared through London bankers.” (Clark)

 

He married in August 1775, “the greatest beauty of her day,” Mary Lee, the sister of his classmate, Captain Joseph Lee, of the Revolution, and the daughter of the patriot, Col. Jeremiah Lee, of Marblehead. Colonel Lee was a member of the famous Province Committee of Safety and Supplies, with Adams and Hancock, chairman of the Essex County Congress, 1774, a delegate to the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, and elected to the first Continental Congress by the town of Marblehead, as its delegate. Upon their marriage, Patrick Tracy built for his son a beautiful brick mansion on State street, Newburyport, and there Nathaniel Tracy and his bride made their home. This mansion is now the city library of Newburyport, and in it Stuart's portrait of Nathaniel Tracy hangs (1921), having been presented to the town by Tracy's grandson, General William Raymond Lee, of Boston.

 

According to a "Memorial to Congress" in 1806, reproduced in the Newburyport Herald of December 12, 1826, the first American privateer of the Revolution, the “Game Cock”, was fitted out and owned by Nathaniel Tracy in August 1775.

 

 

 

nat1.jpg

 

Painting by John Trumbull in London in 1784 of Captain Nathaniel Tracy,

owned by a direct descendant of Nathaniel Tracy.

 

 

Nathaniel Tracy (1751-1796) oil on canvas, painted on a visit to London in 1785, and attributed to Mather Brown. (Beaudry 1998) Hung in Newburyport Library; gift of Miss Louisa Tracy Lee and Gen. And Mrs. William Raymond Lee. (Life Magazine 25th October 1943)

 

http://i.ebayimg.com/13/!B)90Ht!BWk~$(KGrHqEOKikEwOFKh2ZzBMPwZYBM0w~~_3.JPG

On September 2nd 1775, General George Washington, wrote to Nathaniel Tracy, authorising him to: “take up for the Service of the said Colonies so many Vessels as shall be necessary for transporting from this Army on a secret Expedition” (Papers of George Washington, Vol. 1 404-5)

 

To Nathaniel Tracey Esq. Newbury Port

By his Excellency George Washington Esq

Commander in Chief of the Army of the United Stated

To Nathaniel Tracey Esq.

You are hereby authorized and impowered to take up for the Service of the sd. Colonies so many Vessels as shall be necessary for the transporting a Body of Troops to be detached from this Army on a secret Expedition: Freight of such Vessels to be paid in such a Manner and at such a Rate as is indorsed hereon: And in Case of Loss or Damage to such Vessels or any of them such Loss or Damage to be compensated by the Publick according to an Estimation to be made before the sd. Vessels proceed in the above Service.

Head Quarters, September 2, 1775.  G. Washington

 

(Note 35: In the writing of Joseph Reed. The vessels were to take Arnold's troops to the Kennebec River, whence he started on his march against Canada. Reed added a note to the draft that Colonel Orne, of Marblehead, Mass., and two other persons were to appraise the vessels before they proceeded.)

 

When Arnold's expedition against Canada, by way of Maine, was quartered at Newbury, we find that on September 17th, 1775, the officers dined at Mr. Nathaniel Tracey's. Writing from Fort Western, September 28th, Arnold returns his thanks “for the many favors received from” Mr. Nathaniel Tracey, at Newburyport, and desires his best respects to “Mrs. Tracey, your brother, and Mr. Jackson.”

 

In November 1775, in a letter from Benjamin Hichborn, Colonel in the elite Independent Cadets, to John Adams, he states the following:

 

“As we may expect our Coast to swarm with Transports and Men of War next Spring, I hope the Congress will take the precaution of having some ships of considerable force prepared to receive them. Two or three Frigates of two and thirty Guns, woud be of incredible Service, with Such a naval force, we might venture among a fleet of Transports and perhaps captivate the greatest part of their mighty armament. Shoud any thing of this kind be in agitation, I woud beg leave to mention Mr. Natl. Tracy as a Person every way qualified to undertake the building and fitting such Vessels for the Sea, and I think his zeal and service to the Publick in providing transports for Coll. Arnold's Expedition, without the least consideration, (tho he advanced large sums of Money, which he has not yet received) may entitle him to some notice. But I presume you are too well acquainted with his Character and disposition, to need any thing I can say by way of Recommendation.”

 

In December 1775, Nathaniel Tracy wrote to Elbridge Gerry, Watertown

 

Cambridge, Col. Glovers Quarters, Decemr 5. 1775

Tuesday Evening

Dear sir I waited on General Washington Saturday Morning last [December 21& prayed him to furnish me with [a few] pieces of Cannon to help hoist the number I [intend] for the Privateer we intend fixing, the Plan pleased him but he assured me it was not then in his Power to assist me since which I have several Times conversed with General Gates on the Subject & this Afternoon he promised that the Vessell should be compleated furnished with Cannon in abt 18 or 20 Days if I am not disappointed in this, nothing can prevent my going on with the Plan of arming the Schooner as I mentioned to you last Saturday – Therefore would be glad you would inform me By the Bearer wether it would be agreeable to you to take about a sixth or an eighth Part of the Schooner -'

The amount of the Cost of the Vessell, arming & fixing of her compleately with 12 or 14 6 & 4 Pounders with 4 2 Pounders, & a number of Swivells, 6 Months Provisions will amount by the best Calculations we are able to make to £2000 Lawful1 Money, chargeing every Article of the Expence at a most extravagant rate - the Persons concerned are Mr [Jonathan] Jackson, Mr John Tracy, & Mr Jos Lee, Capt Wm Wyer (a very clever Fellow & who will do extremely well for the Captain) & myself. we all wish you would join us for many Reasons - If General Gates should disappoint us, I shall send immediately to Rhodeisland to procure the Cannon there - & hope the Vessel will be ready to sail in a Month - I wish to have an oppertunity of conversing with you on this Subject, but have some perticular Business to do with Colo. Glover this Evening which prevents my waiting on you & I must be at home by 12 oClock to Morrow - pray what kinds of Restrictions will the Council Lay upon the Commissions of Privateers & what Amount will the [Bond be] taken for - what are the common Customs & Regulations for Privateers as to shares? - as conveniences for writing at the Camp are extreme[lyj [bad], I hope you will Excuse the Inacureatness of [thils Letter - the bearer will wait your Answer -

I am [&c.] Nat. Tracy

 

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Throughout the following spring in 1776, Newburyport and Salem continued to be the most active privateering ports. Two new privateers were commissioned in mid-May. Nathaniel Tracy's Success hailed out of Newburyport, carrying fifteen men and armed with four swivels. During the next eight years, he was the principal owner of one hundred and ten merchant vessels, having a gross tonnage of 15,660 tons. These vessels, with their cargoes, were valued at $2,733,300. Twenty-three of these were letters of marque, and carried 298 carriage-guns and 1,618 men. During the war Tracy's cruisers and privateers captured 120 vessels, aggregating 23,360 tons, with 2,225 men. These vessels, with their cargoes, were sold for the large sum of $3,950,000 in specie. Nor was this the only service Tracy rendered to the country; for, during these trying times, he loaned the government more than $167,000, besides providing much assistance in the matter of clothing and other necessities. He was also described as possibly being the richest man of his day, worth over $6,500,000 in 1780. Of this large fleet only thirteen were left at the end of the war, the others were either lost or captured. The services which these vessels rendered to the government in bringing in stores of ammunition and supplies intended for the British army were inestimable.

 

On 1st May 1776, in a letter from William Gordan to John Adams, he states that "Tracy's vessel is arrived at Kennebec immediately from Bourdeaux with 21,000 lb. of powder 12,000 lb. of sulphur and 16 pieces of large cannon.”

 

In October 1776, Sir George Colliers describes Mr Nathl Tracey of Newberry Port as the Agent for the Exchange of Prisoners on the part of the Rebellious Inhabitants of Massachusetts

Bay, and gave the following instructions to Thomas Stone as the Commissary appointed to settle the Exchange of Prisoners at Newbury Port:

 

On Your Arrival at Marble Head You are to Write the following Letter to Mr Nathl Tracey at Newberry Port

Sir I am to inform you of my arrival at this Port in the Pacific Cartel Sloop with 96 American Prisoners, and as I understand you are empower'd to receive them, and to treat for an equal Number & Rank of His Majesties faithful Subjects now confin'd in this Province I shall be glad to meet you as soon as possible for so Salutary a Purpose I am Sir [kc.]

 

Early in the year 1778, a Convention of Delegates of the County of Essex was held by John Hancock. Farther aid came from his admirable townsmen, Jonathan Jackson and Nathaniel Tracy. The following is a letter received from George Washington:

 

To Nathaniel Tracey Esq. Newbury Port

Head Quarters, November 12, 1778.

Sir: It was not till the return of Major Gibbs from the Eastward, that I discovered how much the cheerfulness of my table was owing to you. The pipe of Wine, which you sent me, was till then, mistaken for a purchase of the commissary; but notwithstanding its goodness, there still remained enough to remember the sender. I beg you may accept my thanks, and am etc”

 

According to a short article in the 23 Feb 1822 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts), he also made the following gift to Washington:

 

“During the revolutionary war, two masonic aprons and sets of jewelry were sent from England to Lord Howe at Boston. The vessel was taken by a privateer belonging to Mr. Tracy of Newburyport. The owner of the privateer presented General Washington with one set, and the other to a gentleman of this town, who at his decease bequeathed them to his son, from whom the proprietor of the Columbian Museum has borrowed them to decorate the figure of the immortal Washington on the 22d inst.”

 

The convention meeting at Cambridge in September 1779, included Mr. Nathaniel Tracy as one of the delegates from Newburyport.

 

In 1778/9, Nathanial Tracy added the Pierce Farm in Newbury to his holdings, which at the time was the most valuable property in the town. Later, he retired to this property and died there. (Beaudry 1998)

 

In 1779, he initiated improvements to the town of Newburyport. On 9th March, he was empowered to plant trees on High street where the old rope-walk stood near Frog pond. He was a selectman in 1780 and 1781. In 1781, along with other public minded citizens, land was given to lay out a handsome street between Fish and Queen street.”

 

In 1780, John Adams was in Europe and when in Amsterdam in October, he wrote to Nathanial Tracy thanking him for his kindness to his wife. From the entries in his diary, early in 1780, Adams was using the Tracys’ ship to transport goods from Bilbao to Boston, for which Nathanial Tracy did not charge Abigail Adams. The brigantine Phoenix, James Babson, captain, owned by the Tracy's and the ship Rambler, commanded by Benjamin Lovett and owned by Andrew Cabot. The Traceys and the Cabots had close connections with the Bilbao firm of Joseph Gardoqui & Sons. In February 1781, he wrote from Admsterdam to Benjamin Franklin, regarding his lack of funds:

 

“This Morning, the House of Botereau & Co. of this City, presented to me, Sixty Six Bills of Exchange drawn by Congress on the 26th. day of October last, in favour of Nathaniel Tracy, of Newbury Port, amounting to the Sum of Ten Thousand Pounds sterling, payable at Ninety days Sight.”

 

In 1781, John Adams was still trying to secure funds from Benjamin Franklin to pay £10,000 owing to Nataniel Tracy

 

From John Adams

Amsterdam Feb. 15. 1781

Sir This Morning, the House of Botereau & Co. of this City, presented to me, Sixty Six Bills of Exchange drawn by Congress on the 26th day of October last, in favour of Nathaniel Tracy, of Newbury Port, amounting to the Sum of Ten Thousand Pounds sterling, payable at Ninety days Sight.— I was obliged to ask the favour of the House, to wait untill I could write to your Excellency, to see if you can furnish the Funds to discharge these Bills.— Without your Warranty, they must be protested, for I have not yet obtained a Single Ducat, nor any certain assurance of one. I have at length fixed my Plan, and when it shall be made certain that the War with England is to continue the Prospectus will be published and the Experiment tryed. Some Present think I shall get Some Money. But there is no Certainty of it.— If this People should make Peace with England which they will if they can, We Shall get no Money at all.— I think however that a Peace is impossible and therefore am not without hopes of borrowing Some Money. I must request the Honour of your Excellencys answer by the Return of Post, because at that Time Mr Botereau will expect an answer from me.— With great Respect I have the Honour to be

Dr Franklin

 

In 1781, Nathaniel Tracy had bought a mansion in Cambridge that had been confiscated from the Loyalist John Vassall (now known as Longfellow House). French transports were in Boston harbour in May 1781 with about 6,300 soldiers who would march north to the siege of Yorktown. In his home in Cambridge, he entertained the Compte de Grasse and his officers of the French fleet, with a celebrated “frog dinner”. This dinner is described by Andrews in his “Letters,” and is worth reading. The following is an account by Samuel Breck:

 

 “Mr. Nathaniel Tracy, who lived in a beautiful villa at Cambridge, made a great feast for the admiral and his officers. Everything was furnished that could be had in the country to ornament and give variety to the entertainment. My father was one of the guests, and told me often after that two large tureens of soup were placed at the ends of the table. The admiral sat on the right of Tracy, and Monsieur de l’Etombe on the left. L’Etombe was consul of France, resident at Boston. Tracy filled a plate with soup, which went to the admiral, and the next was handed to the consul. As soon as L’Etombe put his spoon into his plate he fished up a large frog, just as green and perfect as if he had hopped from the pond into the tureen. Not knowing at first what it was, he seized it by one of its hind legs, and, holding it up in view of the whole company, discovered that it was a full-grown frog. As soon as he had thoroughly inspected it, and made himself sure of the matter, he exclaimed, “Ah! mon Dieu! un grenouille!” then, turning to the gentleman next to him, gave him the frog. He received it, and passed it round the table. Thus the poor crapaud made the tour from hand to hand until it reached the admiral. The company, convulsed with laughter, examined the soup-plates as the servants brought them, and in each was to be found a frog. The uproar was universal.”

 

In 1784, he intended to travel to Europe and had letters of introduction from both George Washington and Thomas Cushing representative of Boston:

 

From George Washington (unpublished)

Philadelphia May 6th. 1784.

Dear Sir, Mr. Tracy the bearer of this, is a Gentleman of Fortune from Massachusetts bay—on a visit to Europe.

His political character, and character for benevolence and hospitality are too well established in this Country to need any other recommendation, notwithstanding I have taken the liberty of giving him this letter of introduction to you. With very great esteem and regard—I am—Dear Sir Your Most Obedient Servant

G Washington

The Honble. Doctr. Franklin

Addressed: The Honble / Doctr Franklin / Paris / Favored / by / Mr. Tracy

 

From Thomas Cushing (unpublished)

Boston July. 2d. 1784

Sir, Governor Jefferson who sails for Europe by this Conveyance will be able to afford you every necessary Intelligence relative to the State of our affairs in America, it will therefore be needless for me to say any thing upon that Subject.

I beg leave to Introduce The Honorable Nathll. Tracy to your Acquaintance, a Gentleman of good Sense and who has for some time past been largely concerned in Trade and carried it on with great Reputation; He was a member of the Senate the last year, but at the close of it was oblidged to obtain leave to retire from that Business, as his affairs required him to Prepare for a Voyage to Europe, you will find him a very Agreable Gentleman, I recommend him your friendly Notice, any civility you may shew him shall be gratefully Acknowledged. I wish you much Health and Happiness and that your negotiations may do? issue to your own satisfaction and contribute to the lasting Welfare and happiness of your Constituents I remain with great Respect Your most humble Servant

Thomas Cushing

His Excellency Benjamin Franklin Esqr

 

He owned many residences and at this time, and it was said that he might well travel from Newburyport to Philadelphia and sleep in his own house every night. As it was a matter of a week's journey at that time, we may judge somewhat of the extent of his possessions. He owned the Vassall house in Cambridge, now owned by the Longfellow family; he had a farm in Medford, said to have been “Ten Hills Farm”; he had large properties in Connecticut; and, with his superb mansion in Newburyport, the Spencer- Pierce farm in Newbury, with the stone house, and other lands and houses in different places, he was enabled to live in the most luxurious manner. He had the finest horses and coaches, and possessed a well-selected library. His cellars were stocked with the choicest wines, his horses and carriages were the best that money could buy, and the appointments at the table were rich and sumptuous. At his home in Cambridge, he entertained many distinguished guests, and in the brick house on State street, Newburyport, he was often honoured by visits of officers prominent in public life. On the 9th August 1782, his new house, old dwelling house and barn were consumed by fire.

 

Nathaniel Tracy was the first treasurer of Dummer Academy until 1784, was a selectman of his town, a deputy to the General Court in 1780, 1781 and 1782, a State Senator in 1783, a delegate to the United States Constitutional Convention, and with his brother-in-law, Jonathan Jackson, he was a charter member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He also made at least one contribution to the records of the Massachusetts Historical Society in its early days. Newburyport was known for it’s zeal for the order of free masonry. St. John’s Lodge was the oldest in the town, it’s charter dates from 1766, however there are no records of its meetings until 1781. Among the first masters were Nathaniel Tracy & John Tracy in the early 1780’s. On 13th May 1783 he received a vote of thanks for public services from the town.

 

John Barry wrote to him in 1783, regarding money that he owed him (Griffin):

 

N. Tracy Esquire— , On board the Alliance Pautuxet [Rhode Island] April 3. 1783.

Dr Sir

I have the pleasure to Inform you of my safe arrival here a few Days ago from the Havana, where I left a Brig belonging to you, Capt Johnston from Bordeaux, I think you need be under no apprehensions of his being taken for its my opinion he will not sail in all this Month, in a Great Measure owing to his not having permission to Land his Cargo, those things take time for the officers there will not be hurried. In short they are a Lazy, indolent people altogether. I wrote you when I was in America last that I had Given Mr Samuel Broom the Money I owed you and he promised he woud pay you in Boston Be pleased to lett me know if you have Got it, and if you have advanced any more in the same way in order that I may pay, however if you have not it is well, as I have Got Money there through another Channell. My best Respects to all your Good Family, and believe me to be,

Dr Sir, Your most obedt Humble Servt

(Signed) J. Barry

 

Also in August 1783, in a letter from George Washington, regarding hospitality to be given to the Count de Vermé of Portugal, he requests of Nathaniel Tracy that "Should he stand in need of Money, be so good as to advance it to him, and his bills will be immediately paid." (Writings of George Washington)

 

Nathaniel Tracy by 1783 had become linked to Lane, Son and Fraser of London. John Lane (whose father had recently died) in 1784 went to Boston from London, as in 1783 his father had unwisely loaned money to Tracy, who was verging on bankruptcy. In 1784, Nathaniel Tracy went to Europe on his ship Cerut (or Ceres), Captain St Barbe,  endeavouring to bring about a satisfactory settlement of his business affairs. Thomas Jefferson, had been named Minister Plenipotentiary to Great Britain with Mr. Adams and Dr. Franklin. Jefferson and his two daughters, were Tracy's guests upon this voyage. Jefferson was a close friend and wrote a poem about him.

 

Mar. 16. On the 7th. of May Congress resolved that a Minister Plenipotentiary should be appointed in addition to Mr. Adams & Dr. Franklin for negotiating treaties of commerce with foreign nations, and I was elected to that duty. I accordingly left Annapolis on the 11th. Took with me my elder daughter then at Philadelphia (the two others being too young for the voyage) & proceeded to Boston in quest of a passage. While passing thro' the different states, I made a point of informing myself of the state of the commerce of each, went on to New Hampshire with the same view and returned to Boston. From thence I sailed on the 5th. of July in the Ceres a merchant ship of Mr. Nathaniel Tracey, bound to Cowes [England?]. He was himself a passenger, and, after a pleasant voyage of 19. days from land to land, we arrived at Cowes on the 26th. I was detained there a few days by the indisposition of my daughter. On the 30th. we embarked for Havre, arrived there on the 31st. left it on the 3d. of August, and arrived at Paris on the 6th. I called immediately on Doctr. Franklin at Passy, communicated to him our charge, and we wrote to Mr. Adams, then at the Hague to join us at Paris.

Thomas Jefferson: Autobiography, 1743-1790 http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/mod/jefferson-autobio.html

 

Tracy went on to Portugal, in hopes of obtaining a satisfactory settlement of his accounts with Guardoqui, but in this he was disappointed. He remained in Europe several months, but at length was compelled to return home, broken-hearted and discouraged. In the letters of Benjamin Franklin in Paris, there are the following:

 

6 May 1784 [or 1783? Writings of George Washington]. From [General] George Washington. Philadelphia. Introducing Mr. [Nathaniel] Tracy of Massachusetts Bay.

17 December 1784 in Paris, Messrs. Jackson, Tracy, Donnaldson and Temple, Requesting passports for themselves and their servants.

 

In September 1784, he travelled from Paris to London carrying some correspondence from John Adams to Cotton Tufts of Weymouth.

 

As late as 1785, Nathaniel Tracy was the wealthiest person in Newburyport, owning large amounts of waterfront property, and inheriting a successful business from his father Patrick Tracy. In July 7, 1785, Hon. Nathaniel Tracy, was appointed as part of a committee to present an address to His Excellency Governor Bowdoin.

 

In 1786, he found himself hopelessly involved in financial difficulties, and with the close of the war his wealth vanished like smoke. His vessels were captured, his varied enterprises met with disaster instead of success, and he found himself bankrupt, owing large sums which he could not pay. His splendid estates were sold for a small portion of their value, and he retired from active business pursuits. With his wife and children, he lived in comparative quiet and seclusion for the remainder of his days in the old stone mansion on the Spencer-Pierce farm in Newbury, which was secured to his family by his father, Captain Patrick Tracy. He was so loved and respected by his fellow-townsmen, many of whom were his creditors, that he was not pressed by claims for money due.

 

The following is an extract from Glynn County Deeds [Costal Georgia Page 2-9 see also John Tracy]:

 

South Carolina: Indenture dated 9 March 1787 between Nathaniel Tracy of Newbury Port with the County of Essex, Commonwealth of Mass.; and Mary, his wife, and William Scarborough of Charleston, South Carolina. William was to pay 20 shillings to seal this record for purchasing a plantation that at the time of the original grant was located in South Carolina, but is now in Georgia.  The tract of land contains 3,446 acres and originally granted to William Harvey bearing the date 21 May 1763, situated southward of the Altamaha River and bounded to the eastward by land surveys for Richard Stevens, and westward by vacant land, and land possessed by William Kelsey, and to the Northwards by the Altamaha River and southward by vacant lands.  The plantation was sold to James Hume, Esq., by William Harvey.  John Hume and Alexander Rose conveyed it to Nathaniel Tracy and his wife Mary, to sell in whole the gardens, orchards, fences, ways, wells, waters, water courses, easements, profits, commodities, advantages, etc. Signed by Nathaniel & Mary Tracy, William Scarborough.  Witness to the Tracy’s signatures were Alexander Moore and John Lubb(?).  Witnesses to Wm. Scarborough’s signature were James Patterson and Robert Garonere (? could be Garonne).

William Scarborough paid 12,000 pounds South Carolina money due by the 1st of March 1788. Brunswick, Glynn County, Georgia entered in Book A, page 1 by John Goode of the clerks office.

 

05-21-1806 Charleston Courier (Charleston, South Carolina)

Charleston May 14 1787 Messrs Lane Son and Fraser...I have received by Robert Gardner? the deeds of lease and release of a tract of land on the river Altamaha, in the state of Georgia; containing three thousand four hundred acres, being the same which you took from Nathaniel Tracy, esq  as a collateral security for the payment of his bond of twelve thousand pounds current money of South Carolina, which, bond and the dee of release before mentioned, are dated March 10, 1787...Wm Scarborough

 

The future President John Quincy Adams, who was at that time a student at law in the office of Theophilus Parsons in Newburyport, gives a good description of John and Nathaniel Tracy and their families in his diary for the years 1788-89. He knew of the Tracys from his travels in Spain with his father in 1780.

 

“Pickman had agreed to go with me, and hear Parson Tucker preach this forenoon; but some circumstance prevented him; so I went alone. The Dr. gave us a very good sermon upon the education of children. I went home with Mr. Tracey to dinner, and Pickman soon came in. We dined and pass'd the afternoon with Mr. Tracey. This gentleman, was in the course of the war, peculiarly fortunate and accumulated, an immense fortune; but he has since been equally unluckily, and is now, very much reduced. The generosity of his heart is equal to any estate whatever: and although he has not been so prudent, as might be wish'd, yet everyone who is acquainted with him, must lament his misfortunes, and heartily wish he may retrieve his affairs.” Diary of John Quincy Adams 23rd March 1788

 

In 1788, Brissot de Warville visited Tracy at Newburyport, and a description of Tracy and his household is found on pages 254 and 255 of his “Notes of Travel in the U.S.”:

 

“We dined at Newbury with Mr. Tracy, who formerly enjoyed a great fortune, and has since been reduced by the failure of different enterprises, particularly by a contract to furnish masts for the marine of France. The miscarriage of this undertaking was owing to his having employed agents in procuring the first cargo, who deceived him and sent a parcel of refuse masts that were fit only for firewood. Though the manner in which Mr. Tracy bad been deceived was sufficiently proved, yet, for the clerks of the marine at Versailles, whose interest it was to decry the American timber, this fact was sufficient to enable them to cause it to be ever after rejected. And Mr. Tracy's first cargo was condemned and sold at Havre for 250 1. He lives retired; and, with the consolation of his respectable wife, supports his misfortunes with dignity and firmness.”

 

Alice Tucker wrote, October 20, 1789:

 

"Just at dusk, I took a walk to Mr. Nat. Tracy's. This antique building is situated in the very bosom of retirement, and is surrounded by well cultivated fields and gardens. You have in view a thick wood, and a pretty water prospect completes the landscape. I found Mrs. Tracy, dress'd genteelly, sitting at her tea table with her children about her. She is a very handsome accomplished woman, and knows very well how to keep up her dignity." A little over a year later she described another visit : "As soon as we got to their yard a neat looking maid came out to open the gate for us, and conducted us into the house and into the dining chamber, which is spacious and has a genteel and an airy appearance considering its antiquity. Mrs. Tracy received with that politeness which is so natural to a well bred woman. Our repast was slender ; two cups of tea, and one small piece of biscuit. After tea the children came from the nursery, [torn] and with them an illegitimate orphan call'd Lucy [illegible]. . . . How fortunate are such children when they meet with relations or friends that are disposed to give them suitable educations." Manuscript journal of Alice Tucker, December 13, 1790 cited in Diary of John Quincy Adams

 
In 1789, Washington was again in Newburyport and was accommodated by the Tracys.
 
11-01-1816 Lancaster Journal (Lancaster, Pennsylvania)
"We have often heard it asserted," says the Analectic Magazine, "that Washington never smiled but once in his life." This we know not to be true; for we recollect, when in 1789, he was at Newburyport, seeing him laugh hearty; a proper hoh hoh laugh. He stood at the gate of Mr. Tracy's yard, while the procession of select-men, clergy, lawyers, doctors, carpenters, smiths, taylors, shoemakers, schoolmasters, with their pupils &c. &c. passed; the last were the sailors commanded by captain Bradnury, with boatswains whistling, & some old sailors fiddling, one of whom had a droll way of jerking his elbow. There was a universal loud laugh; Washington too laughed hearty, bending his head and shoulders down a considerable distance; Those who were quite intimate with him, say he was occasionally fond of jocular anecdotes. He, however, in the later part of his life, had not time for laughing - he was too busy thinking of what would promote the welfare of his country. [Vir. Pat
 
A petition for funds was presented to the House, read and referred to the secretary of the treasury on 20 July 1790. Hamilton’s report was received, read, and tabled on 17 April 1792.
 

Tracy lived the last decade of his life in retirement at his country estate at Pipe-Stave Hill, supported by his wealthier friends. In the 1790 census, he is listed as living in Newbury (Nathaniel Tracy Esq. Newbury #087). He died at the early age of forty-five in 1796.

 

His portrait was painted three times, once by Stuart (or Copley or Mather Brown) formerly owned by Gen. W. R. Lee, and given by him to the town of Newburyport (it now hangs in the Tracy mansion, the Public Library); once by Trumbull, and in the 1920s was owned by his great-granddaughter, Mrs. Elizabeth Amory Lee Ernst, the daughter of General Lee; and once by Miss Hills and his miniature and that of his wife was owned by Mrs. Ernst and Mrs. Elizabeth Lee Ernst Grinnell. The third likeness is owned by the Newburyport Historical Society. Some of Tracy silver is housed in the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, including the Paul Revere Goblets (Nathaniel Tracy ordered six silver goblets on April 15, 1782).
 
In a memorial presented to congress ten years after his death it was claimed, that from the beginning of the Revolutionary war until peace was declared in 1783, he was the principal owner of one hundred and ten merchant vessels which with their cargoes were valued at $2,733,300 in specie. Twenty-three of these vessels were letters of marque, carrying two hundred and seventy-eight guns and sixteen hundred and eighteen men. All but thirteen, out of a total of one hundred and ten, were lost or captured. He was also principal owner of twenty-four cruising ships, six thousand three hundred and thirty tons register, carrying three hundred and forty guns and twenty-eight hundred men. These ships captured during the war one hundred and twenty vessels, carrying two thousand, two hundred and twenty-five men. The vessels with their cargoes were sold for $3,950,000. From this sum Mr. Tracy contributed $167,219 for supplies furnished the army and merchandise imported for the colonial government. (Newburyport Herald, December 4, 1832.)
 
A gigantic oil painting, 32 by 20 feet, was commissioned by the Irish Government in 1929, to hang in the Irish Industries Hall of the New York World Fair. It contained 30 figures of famous Irish-Americans to symbolise Ireland’s contribution to the development of the United States. In the place of honour nearest the figure of America, was the founder of the American Navy Commodore John Barry of Wexford, supported by Captains Nathaniel Treacy and Jeremiah O’Brien. Also included was Patrick Treacy Jackson as builder of the first railway in America to symbolise that not all famous Irish-Americans are warriors or statesmen.
 
His wife, Mary Lee Tracy died in Newburyport in 1819; she left no will, but her estate was inventoried at $900.00 in real estate and $165.50 in personal goods. Her home was furnished with four beds, three bureaus, 18 chairs and a sofa, equipment for two fireplaces, two tea trays, miscellaneous "kitchen furnature", and 10 ounces worth of silver. During her widowhood she lived frugally and carefully managed Nathaniel Tracy's estate for the children, and at her death Louisa, Helen, Jeremiah and Nathaniel each received an inheritance of just under $3,000. The administrator of her estate was Nathaniel Tracy. Essex County Registry of Probate 1819 & 1820. (Beaudry 1998)
 
His eldest daughter became the mother of Colonel Wm. R. Lee, distinguished in the Civil War. His son Jeremiah was an artillery officer in the war of 1812. His son Nathaniel became a prominent broker in Boston.
 
 

Colonel John Tracy, born 1753, was the second son of Captain Patrick Tracy and Hannah Gookin. He attended the Dummer Academy and graduated Harvard College in 1771. In his junior year he was degraded six places for his part in hanging an effigy of one of the tutors, Stephen Scales (class of 1763), from a tree on the north side of Holden Chapel, then cutting it down and parading it around the college until it was finally hung at the door of the tutor's chamber in Massachusetts Hall. Tracy was twice punished for defacing books and several times for absences, but the faculty tempered its punishments with kindness, for Tracy was sometimes excused from commons and was given leave to go home for a wedding and, on another occasion, for cure of the itch. On 12 October 1770 the faculty recorded the circumstances of the wild party in Tracy's room as well as its judgment:

 

A Complaint being entered by one in the Government of the College of a riotous Noise late the last Evening at Tracy's Chamber where Sir Lee & another person belonging to Marblehead together with Murray senr, Swett and Cheever were present. Upon Examination of the said Scholars, it appears that Tracy entertained the said disorderly Company & that after said Company was ordered to disperse by one of the Tutors, Tracy continued to entertain them at his Chamber for more than an hour when said Company renewed said riotous & tumultuous Noise to the great dishonor and disturbance of the College and in Contempt of the Government thereof. Whereupon it is voted and adjudged that Tracy who has been already degraded for a riotous & tumultuous Noise be further degraded twelve places in his Class. (Chase 1988)

 
 
 
 

He was vestryman of St. Paul's, Newburyport, 1777-1780, and 1784-1815. From 1780 to 1784 he was senior warden. In March 1784, a committee, including John Tracy, was chosen to build a new work house. Also in 1784, the selectmen, assisted by some of the prominent citizens of the town, including John Tracy, Esq. were expected to visit the public schools and examine the pupils at least once a year.

 

He was an enthusiastic patriot, and served in General Sullivan's army in Rhode Island as aide-de-camp to General Glover. In 1779 he lost vessels in the Penobscot venture. In 1784, John Tracy, Esq received the sum of one thousand six hundred pounds, from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, for the use of the brigantine Pallas on the Penobscot expedition, dated to the first of January, 1781.

 

He was generous and liberal in the expenditure of his wealth, and entertained many other distinguished guests in his hospitable home. Among his guests in November 1782, were the Marquis de Chastellux Major General of the French army, and one of the forty Immortals of the French Academy; Baron de Taleyrand (said to have been a brother of the famous Prince Taleyrand); M. de Montesquieu, grandson of the famous author; Viscount de Vaudreuil, and Marshal and Lieut.-Gen. Lynch. Chastellux's description of his evening there with Colonel and Mrs. John Tracy, her two sisters, and the beauty, Miss Lee (a sister of Mrs. Nathaniel Tracy), is well known.

 

“[H]e came with two handsome carriages, well equipped, and conducted me and my aid-de-camp to his country-house. This house stands a mile from the town, in a very beautiful situation; but of this I could myself form no judgment, as it was already night. I went however, by moonlight, to see the garden, which is composed of different terraces. There is likewise a hot-house and a number of young trees. The house is very handsome and well-furnished, and everything breathes that air of magnificence accompanied with simplicity, which is only to be found among merchants.” (De Chastellux [1780–82]1963)

 

John Tracy was also a pioneer of American landscape design. In the 1780s, He was the first to employ George Heussler, the first professional gardener in the area, to improve the garden developed by his father. In 1785, before Washington street was laid out, John Tracy manufactured cordage in a rope walk from the “Quaker field” graveyard towards the river. Lee states that in 1803 John Tracy was made an honorary member of St. John's Lodge of Masons, but this may refer to another, as he had been a master in the 1780’s.

 

In 1787, he had the following appointment:

 

John Tracy, Esq., of Newbury Port, is appointed Justice of the Peace for the county of Essex. 13 March 1787, in the 11th year of the Independence of the United States.  James Bowdoin, governor of Mass.; granted by Comm. John Avery Joseph(?). [Glynn County Deeds, Costal Georgia Page 1 see also Nathaniel Tracy]

 

John Tracy was also appointed a deputy adjutant general of the Massachusetts militia in 1787. Lists of the officers of the Massachusetts Militia from 1792 to 1799, which include a number of men from Newburyport, and the following “Col. John Tracy, of Newbury-port, Deputy Adjutant-General of the 2nd Division”. He is similarly listed in the 1802 Massachusetts register.

 

John Quincy Adams Diary, Newburyport:

 

“. . Drank tea at Mrs. Hooper’s, and pass’d the evening at Mr. J. Tracy’s. Captn. Fletcher was there. Tracy was quite warm upon the subject of the late election. He is a militia officer, and possessed very strongly of the esprit de corps. He was offended that genl. Titcomb should come in the last of the four members for this town, and in the course of conversation went rather beyond the bounds of prudence.” Diary of John Quincy Adams 25th November 1787

 

“. . . This evening I went with Townsend in the first place to Mr. Atkins's ; this too is an house where I always visit with pleasure, as I am always sure to meet with good sense and sociability. From thence we went to Mr. J. Tracey's, where we found three ladies, all drest in the deepest mourning, and Captn. Farris, who lately lost his wife. Mrs. Tracey is much such a lady as Mrs. Swett, though there are a few distinguishing characteristics. Her husband is a singularity. But he is a justice of the peace and deputy adjutant general of the militia ; and with equal importance and dignity he wields the scales of justice and the sword of Bellona. He frequently tells of his judicial perform ances, and takes pleasure in boasting that to do his duty he must see every man in the county once a year. But he is friendly and hospitable, and indeed, except when mounted on one of his two hobby horses, a very good companion.” Diary of John Quincy Adams 16th January 1788

 

“... In the evening I was walking with Thompson; as we were passing before Mr. J. Tracy's, he invited us in. We pass'd the evening there : it was club night, and there were eight or ten such smoakers that we were almost suffocated. The evening, however, was agreeable j and after supper I completed my walk before I returned home.” Diary of John Quincy Adams 6th June 1788

 

In the 1790 census, he is listed as living in Newburyport (John Tracy Esq. Newburyport #090)

 

George Washington died at Mount Vernon December 14, 1799, but the news did not reach Newburyport until Christmas day, when the church bells were tolled from four o'clock in the afternoon until nine o'clock in the evening. On the second day of January following, there was a procession, composed of citizens, members of Masonic lodges, the orator of day, officiating clergymen, selectmen and officers of the army and navy, under the direction of Col. [John] Tracy and Major [Ebenezer] Bradbury, escorted by the Newburyport Artillery company. In 1800 & 1802, John Tracy was the Moderator for the town of Newburyport. On July 4, 1800, a dinner at Deer island closed the exercises of the day with Col. John Tracy as president, and Capt. Ebenezer Stocker, vice president.

 

In 1801, there are newspaper reports of a declaration of bankruptcy against John Tracy of Newburyport.

 

Thereafter he spent some of his time petitioning for office. He visited Marietta Ohio, in hopes that his classmate from Harvard, Winthrop Sargent, would help him obtain a job. In the 1802 Massachusetts register, John Tracey of Newburyport, Portland is listed as a deputy inspector of tobacco and beef. He finally succeeded in becoming an inspector of tobacco, beef, butter, and lard. But in 1806, after the death of his wife, he relinquished these duties and, according to Shipton, “paralyzed and feeble, spent much of his time in Mrs. David Emery's tavern.” William Farris, was appointed guardian of the two remaining children who disposed of their 2/6 of the estate of John Tracy on 21st June 1811 (see Resolve of Commonwealth of Massachusetts below). John Tracy died in Newburyport in 1815.

 

Lieutenant Robert Tracy, born 1752, eldest son of Nicholas Tracy and Miriam Titcomb. In 1774, he signed a petition (with Captain Patrick and Captain Nicholas) to the selectmen to send a delegate to the Old Continental Congress in Philadelphia. In September 1775, he was 2nd Lieutenant to Captain James Tracy, of the brig Yankee Hero, a privateer of 120 tons, owned by Captain James Tracy, Jno. Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, John Tracy, and Joseph Lee (son of Colonel Jeremiah Lee of Marblehead). The commission was signed on 20th February 1776 by Perez Morton, Deputy Secretary. On 7th May or June 1776 with twelve carriage and six swivel guns, and twenty-six men, on the way from Newburyport to Boston, she struck to the British frigate Milford, of twenty-eight guns, after a desperate encounter, in which four men were killed and thirteen wounded. Lieutenant Tracy and Captain James Tracy was taken to Boston as prisoners, and exchanged after Nathaniel Tracy had interviewed Lord Howe on board the Eagle. “Three officers of the armed schooner " Diligent " appear in endorsement upon said return, as having been accepted in lieu of said Tracey, Captain, and two other officers of the "Yankee Hero" (privateer); Lieut. John Knight accepted in lieu of said Tracey”. He apparently was a gentleman of leisure, having no occupation.

 

Captain James Tracy, Gentleman. In newspaper articles titled “Extract of a letter from Plymouth, Jan 30” printed February 1777, he is stated to be from Ireland, a nephew of Patrick Tracy and a cousin Nathaniel and John Tracy. Variations on this article describe him as a Roman Catholic. Lee, states that he may have been a brother of Nicholas Tracy. If this is the case, he probably arrived in America after his father’s death and will of 1768. He was a very gallant sea fighter. He was captain of the brig Yankee Hero commissioned 20th February 1776. A commission granted Capt. James Tracy reads as follows:

 

Colony of the Massachusetts Bay. (seal)

The major part of the Council of the Massachusetts Bay in New England to Ja. Tracey, Gentleman, greeting:

Whereas James Tracey, Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracey, John Tracey and Joseph Lee, Merchants, have at their own expense, fixed out and equipped, for the defence of America, a vessel called the Yankee Hero, burthen about one hundred and twenty tons, and have recommended you as a suitable person to be commander thereof : We have thought fit to commission you for the purpose aforesaid, and do accordingly, by these presents give you, the said James Tracey, full power, with such other persons as you shall engage to your assistance, to sail in the said vessel on the seas, attack, take and bring into any port in this Colony all armed and other vessels which shall be found making unlawful invasions, attacks or depredations on the sea-coasts or navigation of any part of America, or improved in supplying the fleet and army, which have been or shall at any time be, employed against the United Colonies, or employed by the enemies of America in any respect whatsoever ; and also all vessels whose masters or supercargoes shall have had designs of carrying supplies of any kind to the enemy, or that shall be returning from the enemy after having carried such supplies, that such proceedings may be had thereon as are required by a law of this Colony entitled " An act for encouraging the fixing out of armed vessels to defend the sea coast of America, and for erecting a Court to try and Condemn all vessels that shall be found infesting the same.'' And you are hereby directed in all your proceedings to govern yourself by the said act.

Given under our hands, and the seal of the said Colony, at Watertown, the 20th day of February, in the sixteenth year of the reign of his Majesty King George the Third.

By their Honours command.

Perez Morton, Deputy Secretary.

Signed : — B. Greenleaf, W. Spooner, Caleb Cushing, T. Cushing, John Wetcomb, Jedediah Foster, Eldad Taylor, B. Lincoln, Michael Farley, J. Palmer, Moses Gill, Jabez Fisher, B. White, S. Holton, and John Taylor.

The Remembrancer, or Impartial repository of public events. Edited by John Almon. 1776

 

After a desperate engagement with the English frigate Milford, Captain Tracy was struck in the thigh by a cannon ball, [Capt. Tracy received a

wound in his thigh, but no ways dangerous;] and second Lieutenant Robert Tracy was taken prisoner. They were both exchanged after Hon. Nathaniel Tracy had interviewed Lord Howe on board the Eagle. The 20-gun ship ‘Hero’ was then built for Captain Tracy, launched June 2, 1777, and sailed for Cape Ann 23rd July. It went on the bar, was got off, and was never heard from after leaving Boston.

 

 

In a letter from Jonathan Jackson to Elbridge Gerry, dated Boston 16th Jany 1777, he writes:

 

Dear Sir,

Having no Friends among the Gentn at Congress, Delegates from this Government, I can claim so much personal Acquaintance with, as yourself, I take the Liberty to call off your Attention a few Minutes from the more weighty Concerns in Politics, to ask your Friendship to one or two Friends of mine, who have a Veiw to some Appointments by your honble Body - Capt James Tracy a Friend of mine & Kinsman to Mrs Jackson, is desirous of being appointed to the Command of one of the Continental Frigates - he was bred up in the British Navy & is perfectly well acquainted with the Regulations of a Man of War - tho' not born in the Country, he is a warm Friend for it's Liberties; & discovered such personal Bravery & Coolness of Temper in the Action he so long & vigorously maintained against the Milford Frigate, in the Yankee Hero Privateer the last Summer,"the Circumstances of which I suppose did not wholly escape you at Phila), that I believe few Men this way are better qualified for such a Command as Capt Tracy wishes for - I inclose you an Extract of a Lr to Genl Washington wrote by Council when my Bror Nat went to solicit an Exchange with Ld Howe of the Offrs & Men of the Y Hero - by it you will perceive the Opinion of the honble Board as to their Merit, while the Action was fresh in their Honour's Memory - Capt Tracy has declined several advantageous Offers to command sundry private Vessels of War & those the most respectable here fitting out - he has Ambition, & perhaps has formed some pleasing Veiws of a rising American Navy, in which Merit may be preferred - I refer you to my Bror Nathl Tracy, should he meet you upon his present Journey to the Southward, for any Enquiries you may please to make respecting Capt Tracy (who is hi Companion in this Journey) & if you can satisfy yourself he has sufficient Merit, you will oblige me to give him your Friendship & Influence for such an Appointment as I have mentioned, & in him I think you will recommend a deserving, capable Man, & may thereby do a real Service to the Country...

 

27 July 1776 Finns Leinster Journal

Extract of a letter from Corke, July 24 “...Lord Howe had carried into Halifax, 13 American prizes he took on his passage out from England; also an American privateer, called the Yankee Hero, of 16 guns, commanded by Capt. Tracy, an Irishman, who was killed in the engagement, with Milford frigate, who took her...”

30 July - 2 Aug. 1776 Belfast Newsletter

…New York. American prizes England privateer Yankee Hero commanded Capt Tracy, Irishman killed engagement Milford frigate…

6 - 9 Aug. 1776 Belfast Newsletter

Halifax June 29 Yankee Hero American privateer guns Capt James Tracey, commander taken resistance Milford frigate wounded killed.

9 August 1776 Edinburgh Advestiser

Extract of a Letter from Capt. Rogers of the Ship John, date Halifax, June 29. "On Sunday the 23d instant was brought in here the Yankie Hero American privateer of 18 carriage guns, and 10 swivels, Captain James Tracey commander, which was taken, after some resistance, by the Milford frigate; the captain of the privateer and twelve men were wounded, and four killed.

16 August 1776 Edinburgh Advestiser

On Sunday evening arrived from off Boston-harbour a privateer brig, in the rebel service, called the Yankee Hero, Capt. Tracey; she was taken by the Milford frigate, of 28 guns, Capt. Burr, after an obstinate engagement, in which the Captain of the privateer received a ball through his thigh, soon after which they struck. She is a fine vessel, and mounts 12 carriage guns and six swivels; her colours were a pine tree on a white field.

8 February 1777 Freemans Journal

Extract of a letter from Plymouth, Jan 30 [printed in a number of newspapers with slight variations]

"...There are four privateers from Newbury Port, the largest of 20 guns, commanded by Capt. James Tracy, late of the Yankey Hero, taken last summer by the Milford man of war. This Tracy is an Irishman, had served in our navy, is a genteel fellow, and a man of spirit; he is a nephew to old Tracy, the principal merchant of Newbury Port, and cousin to the owners of the present prize."

Leeds Intelligencer 11 February 1777

Extract of a letter from Plymouth, Jan 30

"...There are four privateers from Newbury Port, the largest of twenty guns, commanded by Capt. James Tracy, late of the Yankey Hero, taken last summer by the Milford man of war, Capt. Burr. This Tracy is another Irishman, a Roman Catholic, has served in our navy, and is a genteel fellow, and a man of spirit; he is a nephew to old Tracy, the principal merchant of Newbury Port, and cousin to the owners of the present prize."

11 - 14 Feb. 1777 Belfast Newsletter

Plymouth Jan. 30 American prize; Thetis man-of-war Triton master Tilestone; Newbury Port Massachusett's Bay firm owned Jackson/Tracy/and/Tracy. sailed 6 Dec. taken Cape Ortuga captain examined Admiral Amherst, account information intelligence cargo quintals. candles America sterling trade business time. built frigate guns Boston commanded Hector MacNeil, Irishman rebels Quebec joined. Privateers West India goods sugar rum cotton building river contemplation plan seamen merchant service dollars board. smuggler coasts person naval surveyors famous Ordnance Nov. 1775 Capt. James Tracy, late Yankee. Milford Capt. Burr Roman Catholic served genteel fellow nephew old principal cousin beef sterling pork meat portion. price Maryland Pennsylvania produce Indian corn ryeraise serve Highlanders exchanged Boston family effects suffer native affairs spirit.

 

 

file_004

 

 

Capture of the Privateer Yankee Hero. Force, Peter (1843) American Archives. Fourth Series.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Postage stamp issued by Paraguay in 1976, showing the fight between Yankee Hero and Milford. The original painting is by Nowland Van Powell. Note that Yankee Hero is incorrectly shown as flying the “Grand Union” flag. There is specific testimony that she was flying the “Pine Tree” flag. Accurately shown is the deadly full broadside being fired by Milford.

http://www.awiatsea.com/incidents/6%20June%201776%20Action%20between%20Yankee%20Hero%20and%20Milford.html

 

 

Some time this year [1778] the privateer Sea Flower, Captain Tracy, sailed from Newburyport and was never heard from. She had among her complement of men, John Skolfield, Captain John Campbell, Eben Stanwood, William Stanwood, David Stanwood, John Black, William Reed, William Hunt, David Stanwood, Jr., and James Dunning, all from this vicinity. [Brunswick, Topsham, and Harpswell] (Wheeler & Wheeler1878)

 

According to Thomas Amory Lee, James Tracy probably drowned at sea or was killed about October 1777. However, in April 1794, there is a deputation by James Tracy, late master of the brig Falmouth from New London, whose ship was captured at sea by Daniel Morgan and was carried into Montserrat as a prize of the British, in anticipation of war with the United States. In the 1 May Greenfield Gazette of Massachusetts and 3 May 1784 Delaware Gazette, they publish a letter from him in which he states about their actions "My list of prizes is about 400; all of which are condemned."

 

Captain Thomas Tracy, master mariner, was unanimously voted a member of the Newburyport Marine Society, of ship masters, on the 6th December 1781 and was still a member in 1798. He is the only Tracy listed as a member. He was from the south of Ireland having left there around 1766 by own account. He was probably of this family, but the connection is not known. He is perhaps the mariner who died in Marblehead in 1807. (No. 27,973 Essex County Probate). The following is the war record:

 

Thomas Tracey. Chief Mate, ship "Duke de Chartres," Alexander Wilson, Master; service from Jan. 27, 1777, to Jan. 27, 1778, 12 mos.; also. Master, ship "General Arnold" (privateer); petition dated Newburyport, April 15, 1778, signed by Samuel Newhall, in behalf of himself and others, of Newburyport, asking that Moses Brown be commissioned as commander of said vessel; ordered in Council April 16, 1778, that a commission be issued.

 

Thomas Tracey. Receipt dated July 22, 1783, for wages for service to May 10, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. John Manley; also, receipt dated Oct. 27, 1783, for wages for service from May 10, 1783, to Oct. 14, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. Manley.

 

In the ‘History of the Marine Society Newburyport’, there is a report that at the request of Captain Thomas Tracey, a committee was formed on the 29th July 1784, to inquire into his conduct during a voyage to Baltimore and Europe (Gottenburg, Sweden)  while he was in command of the “Queen of France”. It states that in January 1783:

 

“That his detention in Ireland was occasioned by being obliged to go as far as Cork for a supply of bread, not any being to be procured nearer which he says might have been performed in five days, but being within one day's ride of his parents, from whom he had been absent seventeen years, he was induced to pay them a visit. He was absent from his vessel fifteen days.”

 

At a stretch, a day’s horse ride is about 100 miles which would reach Wexford and Enniscorthy but also most of the south of Ireland.

 

The report of the inquiry issued a certificate of good conduct:

 

“To all persons whom it doth or may concern. The Marine Society of Newburyport, in the County of Essex, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Sends Greeting :

Whereas, Capt. Thomas Tracy, late master of the ship Queen of France, has been charged by his owners with misconduct, and breach of orders, during his late voyage to Baltimore and Europe, and the said Thomas Tracy, having solicited an inquiry into his conduct during the said voyage.

The said society have made a critical and impartial inquiry into the conduct of the said Thomas Tracy during the voyage aforesaid, and are of opinion that no part of his conduct, which has come to their knowledge, ought in the least to disqualify him from the command of a vessel. That all his transactions did appear to be the result of an honest mind, and that his abilities as a seaman are unquestionable.

For witness whereof, the said society have caused their seal to be hereunto affixed, and to be signed by the master of their society.

Given at Newburyport, this 26th day of January A. D., 1786.”

 

The following is the record for the “Queen of France”:

 

1782, November 23 “Queen of France.” Commander: Thomas Tracy. Bonders: Thomas Tracy, John Tracy and William Dyer, also spelled Hyer, Wyer. (Probably Dwyer, correctly). Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, all of Newburyport. 8 guns, 20 men.

 

Perhaps there was a falling out with the other Tracys due to his visit to Ireland.

 

Tracy, Mary (Mrs.), wife of Capt. Thos.Tracy d. in Boston, aged 83 (C.C .July 11,1829)

 

Thomas Tracy and Ann ??? had a son James, baptized in Newburyport, July 10, 1774.

 

The following are also listed as being part of the American Revolutionary navy:

John Tracy, Captain, Privateer, Mass. Navy (born in Ireland)

Michael Tracy, Captain, Privateer, Mass. Navy (born in Ireland)

 

Ensign Nicholas Tracy Jr, born 1773, second son of Captain Nicholas Tracy and Meriam Titcomb. In 1800 the "Washington Light Infantry Company" was formed under Captain Abraham Perkins, Lieutenant Charles Jackson, and Ensign Nicholas Tracy. Charles Jackson, son of Hon. Jonathan J. and Hannah Tracy, was later a Justice of the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court. He was a well-known merchant of Newburyport. In May 31, 1811, there was a great fire in Newburyport and the following was listed: Middle Street, Nicholas Tracy, dwelling-house, unoccupied. His estate (No. 27,970 Essex County Probate) was valued at $26,000. [Nicholas Tracy provided that if his younger son should die a minor, his share should go to his father's brothers and sisters in Ireland]. His descendant, J. Tracy Eustis, owns miniatures of Ensign Nicholas Tracy and of Captain Wyatt St. Barbe.

 

Nathaniel Tracy, Jr., Esq., born 1790, son of Hon. Nathaniel and Mary Lee. In 1803, he graduated from Boston Public Latin School, as had his father. He was a prominent broker of Boston, in the Merchants Exchange, of which he was treasurer so many years. Previous to 1860 his house was at 35 Essex street. He was associated, apparently, with his cousin Jeremiah Lee of Boston. Nathaniel Tracy and his second wife Ann retired to Medford, Massachusetts in 1848. (see Young, Philip (1989) Private Melville)

 

Rev. Thomas Tracy (1781-1872), of Haverhill, Biddeford and Newburyport. He was born in Haverhill, Massachusetts, March 26, 1781. He was a graduate of Harvard 1806. He became on January 14, 1824, pastor of the Second Religious Society in Biddeford and married Ann, daughter of John and Ann (Roberts) Bromfield, of Newburyport on May 5, 1824, in Boston. He went to Newburyport in 1828 and lived in the same house since that time. His sermons were published in the in ‘The Liberal Preacher: A monthly publication of sermons by living ministers’ in 1828 and 1836. He was also noted as a German translator. Rev. Thomas Tracy, died 11 August 1872, a widower, late of Newburyport, left by his will, $3000 to the First Religion Society on Pleasant street.

 

John Tracy, Jr, born 1786, the son of John Tracy and Margaret Laughton, died 1822 Matanzas Cuba.

02-23-1822 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts)

Latting and Tracy, Commission Merchants, Matanzas, Island of Cuba.

08-20-1822 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts)

Married. At Matanzas, July 24th Mr Michael S. Tracy, formerly of Boston to Miss Louisa Andrea, of Matanzas.

09-26-1822 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts)

Died. At Matanzas, 28th Aug. Mr John Tracy, of the house of Lattin & Tracy and formerly of Boston aged 36 - very much esteemed and deeply lamented by numerous friends.

10-18-1823 Repertory (Boston, Massachusetts)

Administrator's sale of estate in Summer-street...One undivided twenty fourth part of a certain lot of land, with the buildings thereon, situated in Summer street, in the city of Boston, said land is bounded easterly by Trinity Church and southerly by Summer street and contains more than 5700 square feet, being 30 feet front up Summer street. The remaining parts of the estate will be sold at the same time, by the owners, so that a complete title may be made to the purchaser. Said twenty fourth being the property of John Tracy, late of Matanzas, merchant, deceased, and sold for the payment of his just debts.

 

 

 

Miller and Tracy, circa 1778-9, Merchants, Boston.

Captain Jared Tracy of Norwich, Conn, served as a commissary during the siege of Boston, and subsequently fought the enemy upon the sea. After the war he went into the West India trade, and died at Demarara in 1790. Also his brother Captain Frederick Tracy died 1803 at Cape Francois.

 

Asa Waterman Papers

Box 2, Folder 137. Miller & Tracey, Merchants 9 Mar 1778 - 3 Jun 1779

Box 2, Folder 190. Jared Tracey 20 Feb 1776 - 27 Jan 1779

Richard Maass Collection of Westchester and New York State

Jared Tracy, Saw Pitts. Receipts October/November 1776

Frederick Tracy, White Plains. Receipts October

 

In 1778 the Commissary Department was still attempting to import the salt it needed. It was not always successful, however, in its efforts. Deputy Commissary General Peter Colt of the Eastern Department, for example, employed Miller and Tracy of Boston to send out vessels to purchase salt. Of the thirteen vessels chartered, more than half were captured on their outward passage by British patrols. Consequently, the Commissary Department owed about 20,000 pounds for the loss of the vessels and for the charter of those that returned. Colt appealed to Congress for funds to discharge these debts and quiet the complaints of the owners of the lost vessels, who were impatient for their money. While the importation of salt was hampered by enemy patrols, coastal salt works in New Jersey and in Virginia became targets for British raiders. Under the system of specific supplies, Congress assigned quotas of salt to be supplied by the states. Neither commissaries nor contractors found it easy to procure an adequate supply, and throughout the war both the civilian and the soldier suffered from its scarcity.

Risch, Erna (1981) Supplying Washington's Army. Center of Military History, United states Army, Washington DC.

 

08-23-1791 New-York Morning Post (New York)

From T. Allen's (New London) Marine List...Arrived, Sloop Sally, Frederick Tracy, from Marinico and St. Martin, 15 days

 

 

1779 miller J Tracy.jpg

 

 

Tracy and Stoker

In the ‘History of the Marine Society Newburyport’ under the heading for Captain Henry Lunt, it states that after 1781 he  joined the new ship Intreped [Intrepid] as first lieutenant, fitted out by Nathaniel Tracy, and commanded by Moses Brown. On a voyage of one year and a half he had one-half million dollars to her credit. Mr. Lunt's prize money amounted to 4098 francs. Afterwards he entered the employ of Tracy & Stocker in the merchant service making twenty-five voyages.

 

 

Brown and Tracey/Tracey and Brown

Charles?, Aug 6 1794. Moses Brown, Nicholas Tracy, owners; Joseph Perkins, Master

Ship Charles...Brown & Tracey of Newberry...Jos Perkins...Dublin...225

Naval documents related to the quasi-war between the United States and France: Naval operations ... February 1797-December 1801

 

 

 

1750-1769 Port of Salem

 

Patrick Tracey 1711-1789 Merchant Of Newburyport, Master of the Polly, the Swan, 1751-1754. Owner of the John, Fame, Charming Betty, Antelope, 1753-1762.

 

Antelope, sch, 68 tons, Nicholas Tracey, from St. Martin's Sept 18, 1755; from Anquilla, feb 17 1756; 70 tons to West Indies, Mar 3 1756; to West Indies, May 26, 1756; from St. Martin's sept 28 1756; 72 tons, to Jamaica, Oct 29 1756; from St. Martin's Apr 20, 1757.

 

Charming Betty, sch., 36 tons, Caleb Woodbury, to Newfoundland, Sept. 5, 1754; 45 tons, from Newfoundland, Nov. 6, 1754; Nicholas Tracey, to Virginia, Nov. 22, 1754 ; from Montserrat, Mar. 13, 1755.

 

Hannah, sch, 60 tons, Nicholas Tracey, from Maryland and to Maryland, Mar. 22 1753.

 

John, sch., 60 tons, Nicholas Tracey, to Newfoundland, Oct. 16, 1753.

 

Miriam, sloop, 66 Tons, Nicholas Tracey, to West Indies, June 29, 1757; from West Indies, Nov. 21, 1757; to West Indies, Feb. 3, 1758; from St. Martin's, July 8, 1758; to West Indies, July 29, 1758.

Sloop Meriam, Feb 6 1758, Master: Nick Tracey, Owner: Patrick Tracey & Nick Tracey, For Eustasia & St Kitts

 

Nancy, sch., 40 tons, Nicholas Tracey, to Virginia or Maryland, Nov. 25, 1752.

 

Polly, sch, 54 tons, Nicholas Tracey, from and to Halifax. Sept 17 1751

Polly, sch, 50 tons, Patrick Tracy, from Newfoundland, Dec 5 1751; to Virginia or Maryland, Dec 14, 1751; from Maryland, Apr. 24, 1752

Polly, sch, 60 tons, Nicholas Tracy, to Newfoundland, July 1, 1752

 

Swan, sloop, 36 Tons, Nicholas Tracy, to Maryland, Jan. 16, 1754; from and to Newfoundland, June 24, 1754; from Newfoundland, Aug. 6, 1754.

Swan, sloop, Patrick Tracey, from Maryland, May 3, 1754.

 

Ref:

Essex Institute historical collections. v.31 1894-95. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uva.x004347846

Tapley, Harriet Silvester (1934) Early coastwise and foreign shipping of Salem; a record of the entrances and clearances of the port of Salem, 1750-1769. The Essex Institute. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/uc1.b3731142

 

 

 

 

 

The Tracy Privateer Fleet

Compiled and arranged in sequence by Thomas P. Cahill, Somerville, Mass. (with additions)

 

Massachusetts Commissioned Privateers of the Revolution, listed in the Massachusetts Provincial Council Records, whose vessels were built, owned, bonded or commanded by captains of Tracy's fleet of Newburyport Privateers. The Tracy fleet during the Revolution, including merchant vessels and privateers, numbered 120 vessels and fifty-four privateers, captured 130 British ships. The 54 privateer vessels included 602 guns and 2,617 men.

 

The Jackson, Tracy & Tracy ledger, 1774-1787, includes accounts of the brig Elizabeth, and the sloops Mermaid, Conway and Lively, and accounts with many merchants and artisans in Massachusetts and New England. The bulk of the ledger's accounts date from 1774-1777. The privateering account book contains accounts of the brigs Hibernia and Pallas. The Mermaid and Conway are not included in the following list.

 
"Minerva", ship. Capt James Tracy. Entered in from Newbury. Quebec Gazette 16 June 1774, No. 492.  Cleared outwards for Salem. Quebec Gazette 7 July 1774, No. 495.
 
1775, August "Game Cork" a sloop of about 24 tons, 4 swivel guns, first sailed from the Merrimac. owned by Nathaniel Tracy.
 

1776, January 13 or 23 “Yankee Hero.” Commander: Thomas Thomas. Bonders and owners: Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel and John Tracy, all of Newburyport. Witnesses: Robert Tracy, Jonathan Jackson. 14 guns, 40 men.

 

1776, February 20 “Yankee Hero.” Commander: James Tracy, Newburyport. Bonders: James Tracy, Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, Thomas Thomas, merchants, all of Newburyport. 14 guns, 40 men.

 

1776, February 20 “Yankee Hero.” Commander: James Tracy. Bonders: James Tracy, Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy and John Tracy, merchants of Newburyport; Joseph Lee, merchant of Marblehead. 14 guns, 40 men.

 

1776, May 7 “Yankee Hero.” Commander: James Tracy. Bonders: James Tracy, Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, Thomas Thomas, merchants, all of Newburyport, owners of same. 14 guns, 40 men.

 

"Newburyport March 25 1776. Received of John Langdon Esqr seventy six pounds 10/

lawful1 Money in full for the Use of the Schooner Success on a late Voyage to the West indies - Nat Tracy," John Langdon Papers, HSP.

1776, May 15 “Success.” Commander: John Fletcher. Bonders: John Fletcher, mariner, and Joseph Marquand, merchant, both of Newburyport, and Martin Brimmer, merchant of Boston. Owner: Nathaniel Tracy, of Newburyport. 2 guns, 14 men.

 

 

 

The vessels of Washington's Fleet carried the Pine Tree Flag into battle, starting in September/October 1775. It was adopted by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress on April 7, 1776. The ‘Yankee Hero’ was commissioned February 20, 1776, and was undoubtedly flown on that date from his vessel in Newburyport, Mass. It was carried into battle by Captain James Tracy on the brig ‘Yankee Hero’, in the battle with the British frigate Milford, off Cape Ann, May 7, 1776.

 

image002

 

The Flag: White Field, Green Pine Tree in the centre.

The Motto: “Appeal to Heaven” underneath.

[Success.  ND7:628, 926-27, ND8:1062, schooner, Capt Giles Peirce, captured by British Cerberus, 29 Dec 1776 or 11 Jan 1777.  This may be the schooner whose crew members were exchanged Dec 1776. Success.  Allen:291, ND7:637, 730, 731, MA privateer schooner, 2 guns 8 swivels, 14 men, Capt John Fletcher, 15 May 1776, and in 1777, owner Nathaniel Tracy of Newburyport.  Captured Endeavor, Isabel, William & Polly, c 1777.   ND9:606, ND10:863, ND11:945, MA privateer schooner, Capt John Fletcher, active in early 1778.]

 

“Dilligent” Captain John Lambert to Jackson, Tracy & Tracy

Old York April 13 1776. Gentlemen, Jotham Moulton Esqr of York has paid for Small Arms for the Schooner Dilligent & the Bills for Repairg said Schooner the Sum of Fifty Three Pounds Fifteen Shillings & 1 d - a Particular Acct of which he will herewith Render to you, Which Sum please to pay him or his Order on Acct of this Collony & you'll Oblige Gentlemen [kc.] £-53..15..1 John Lambert

 

1776, August 10 “Hawke.” Commander: John Lee, Newburyport. Bonders: John Lee, mariner, Jona[than] Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, and John Tracy, merchants, all of Newburyport. Owners: Jackson, Tracy & Tracy (first bond), Martha Lee, Joseph Lee, and Jackson, Tracy & Tracy (second bond).

Note. Two Continental bonds of same date and identical except names of owners and witnesses.

 

1776, September 18 “Civil Usage.” Commander: Andrew Giddings. Bonders: Andrew Giddings [signed Giddinge], mariner, Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, John Tracy,

Thomas Thomas, and John Coffin Jones, merchants, all of Newburyport. Owners: Jonathan Jackson & Co.12 guns, 80 men.

 

1776, November 27 “Lee.” Commander: Nathaniel Odiorne, of Portsmouth, N. H. Bonders: Principle, Jonathan Jackson, of Newburyport, and John Adams, of Boston. Owners not named. 8 guns, 45 men.

 

1777, Jan “Duke de Chartes”. Thomas Tracey. Chief Mate, ship "Duke de Chartres," Alexander Wilson, Master; service from Jan. 27, 1777, to Jan. 27, 1778, 12 mos.

 

11 - 14 Feb. 1777 Belfast Newsletter Plymouth Jan. 30 American prize; Thetis man-of-war Triton master Tilestone; Newbury Port Massachusett's Bay firm owned Jackson/Tracy/and/Tracy. sailed 6 Dec. taken Cape Ortuga captain examined Admiral Amherst, account information intelligence cargo quintals. candles America sterling trade business time. built frigate guns Boston commanded Hector MacNeil, Irishman rebels Quebec joined.  Privateers West India goods sugar rum cotton building river contemplation plan seamen merchant service dollars board. smuggler coasts person naval surveyors famous Ordnance Nov. 1775  Capt. James Tracy, late Yankee. Milford Capt. Burr Roman Catholic served genteel fellow nephew old principal cousin beef sterling pork meat portion. price Maryland Pennsylvania produce Indian corn ryeraise serve Highlanders exchanged Boston family effects suffer native affairs spirit.

 

1777. April 21. By the Rainbow. Brig Windsley Dale (Prize) Nathaniel Tracey Owner, from Bilboa to Newberry, taken off Cape Cod, sent to Halifax – with Iron, Linen and Woolen.

 

1777, May 20 “Fancy.” Commander: John Lee. Bonders: John Tracy and others. Owners: Jonathan Jackson, John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 12 guns, 75 men.

 

1777, June 18 “Hawke.” Commander: Jeremiah Hibbert, of Marblehead. Bonders: Not named. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 10 guns, 60 men.

 

1777, July 2. By the Hinchinbrook. Ship Franklin, Maddet Engs, Master, Jackson and Tracy of Newbery Owners, 250 Tons, 15 Men, from Charles Town to Bourdeaux, taken off Charles Town, sent to St. John’s River – with Rice. London Gazette 2 June 1778.

 

1777, July 4 “Lively.” Commander: Michael Dupuy (probably Duffy), of Marblehead. Bonders: Not named. Owner: Nathaniel Tracy, of Newburyport. 6 guns, 25 men.

 

1777, July 16 “Hero.” Commander: James Tracy, of Newburyport. Petition for commission signed by Robert Tracy. Robert was also the lieutenant. Sailing from Boston in August with a completed crew, the “Hero,” with captain and lieutenant and entire crew, disappeared, going down with the ship at sea without a solitary survivor to tell the tale of what happened. Presumably foundering in a gale. 28 guns, 200 men.

 

1777, July 22 “Gloriosa.” Commander: John Babson, of Amesbury. Bonders: Not named. Owners: Jackson, Tracy and Tracy, of Newburyport. 10 guns, 50 men.

 

[1777, Sally/Salley.  ND9:556, 591, Kaminkow:233, CT privateer brig under Capt Thomas Tracy, captured 21 Aug 1777, certainly before Oct 1777 by the British Sarah Gouldburn/Golburn.]

 

...letter from Captain Nehemiah Holland..."At sea, Sarah Goulburn...19th July 1777. Gentlemen, I congratulate you opon a prize I have taken this day, named the Sally, Thomas Tracy, master, from Charles Town, South Carolina, bound for Nantz, loaded with 470 whole and 120 half barrels rice and betwixt twenty and thirty casks of indigo...

History of the Liverpool Privateers and Letter of Marque: With an Account of ... By Gomer Williams

15 - 19 Aug. 1777 Belfast Newsletter

July 19 gentlemen congratulate prize taken [ship] Sally, Thomas Tracy, master, Charles Town South Carolina, Nantz

10-9-1777 Newport Gazette (Rhode Island)

Yesterday arrived here the ship Sarah Goulburn, letters of marque, Captain Holland, from Liverpool, who on his passage, in the lat. 44 long. 39, took the brig Sally, Thomas Tracy master, from South Carolina bound to Nantz, laden with 540 casks of rice, 26 casks of indigo, trees-wax &c. which Capt Holland sent into Liverpool.

9 - 12 Dec. 1777 Belfast Newsletter

[Ship] Sally, Tracy South Carolina, Nantz.

 

Muster Rolls

Thomas Tracey, Aug 1777, HMS Preston, Sarah Goalbourn/Qetr Marque, to HMS Buffalo

Henry Tracey, 13 Aug 1777 New York, HMS Preston

Owen Tracey, Jun 1777, HMS Preston, Cerberus to Savage 10.63.2

 

1777, September 17 “Gloriosa.” Commander: Daniel Parsons, of Newburyport. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: John Laughton and John Tracy, of Newburyport. 8 guns, 45 men.

 

[1778, Ranger.  H:166, American vessel from New London, CT, Capt and owner Tracy, captured by British in 1778.]

 

1778, January 2 “Wexford.” Commander: John Fletcher. Bonders: Nathaniel Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy and others. 16 guns. 100 men.

1778 May 28. By the Experiment. Brig Wexford (Prize) John Flectcher Master, Nathaniel Tracey Owner, on a cruise to Newberry, when at Sea, sent to Now York – with Provisions. London Gazette 21 November 1778

1778 May 29. By the Experiment. Wexford, 180 Tons, 16 Guns, 105 Men, N. Tracy of Newberry Owner, from Cape Ann, on a cruise in Lat. 43.10 N. Long. 65.00 W. sent to New York, consigned to Mr. Wallace. London Gazette 2 February 1779

 

1778, January 22 “Hornet.” Commander: Nathaniel Bentley. Bonders: John Tracy, of Newburyport, and others. Also the owners. 10 guns, 50 men.

 

1778 “Revenge.” Commander: James Tracy, (This is a newspaper announcement of the 12 February 1778 of his arrival in Bordeaux, and obviously an error that should read Thomas Tracy, as James was lost at sea with the “Hero” in August, 1777.) [Captain Conyngham and the Cutter he commanded called the Revenge.]

 

Boston, February 12, 1778.

Certain Intelligence is received, by the Owners of the private armed Ship Revenge, James Tracy, Esq; Commander, of her safe Arrival at Bordeaux, in France, and all Hands on board well, notwithstanding what our implacable Enemies in New-York and elsewhere, have published, of her being captured by such and such a Ship, belonging to the King of Britain, and carried into such a safe Port.

Independent Chronicle, and the Universal Advertiser (Boston), 19 Feb. 1778.

 

1778, March 28 “Civil Usage.” Commander: John Smith. Bonders: John Smith, of Gloucester, principal; Joseph Barrell and Step[he]n Bruce, of Boston, sureties. Owners: Jackson, Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 14 guns, 75 men,

 

1778, April 16 “General Arnold.” Commander: Moses Brown, of Newburyport. Bonders: Not named. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy and others. 22 guns, 120 men.

Thomas Tracey. Master, ship "General Arnold" (privateer); petition dated Newburyport, April 15, 1778, signed by Samuel Newhall, in behalf of himself and others, of Newburyport, asking that Moses Brown be commissioned as commander of said vessel; ordered in Council April 16, 1778, that a commission be issued.

After the capture of the General Arnold, in June, 1779, by the English frigate Experiment, Captain Brown was taken to Madeira and afterwards to Savannah, Georgia, where he was confined in a prison ship. He was released in November, and in 1780 made a voyage in the brig Mercury to Amsterdam, and afterwards to Cape Francois, returning to Newburyport in January, 1781. In the month of February following, he was captain of the ship Minerva, two hundred and twenty tons burthen, owned by Nathaniel and John Tracy, and was granted a commission, signed by Samuel Huntington, president of the congress of the United States of America, to attack and capture, by force of arms, ships belonging to the crown of Great Britain or to any of the subjects thereof. This commission is now in the possession of Hon. Moses Brown of Newburyport.

 

1778, 17 June “Vengeance” (1) Commander Wingate Newman 17 June 1778-May 1779 (2) Commander Thomas Thomas 20 June 1779-14 August 1779. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy, John Tracy, Thomas Thomas, John Coffin Jones, all of Newburyport, Massachusetts. Total: 20 cannon/120 pounds, Broadside: 10 cannon/60 pounds. 100/120 men.

http://www.awiatsea.com/Privateers/V/Vengeance%20Massachusetts%20Brig%20%5BNewman%20Thomas%5D.html

 

1778, September 2 “Success.” Commander: Philip Trask (incorrectly spelled Thrash). Bonders: Philip Trask, mariner, principle; William Foster and James Tiliston, of Boston and Newbury, sureties. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy and others, of Newburyport. (The name Trask is an abbreviation of and derived from O'Thuriske.) 8 guns, 40 men.

[Success.  Allen:291, FordXIV:608, MA privateer schooner, 8 guns, 40 men, Capt Philip Trask, 2 Sep 1778, owners Nathaniel Tracy and others of Newburyport, captured the Spanish vessel Holy Martyrs.  JA7:13, 9:224, 10:191, probably the schooner mentioned.]

 

1778, Sept 2. "Phoenix", Brigantine.  Commander: James Babson. Bonders: James Babson, mariner, principal; James Tileston and Martin Brimmer, of Newburyport and Boston, sureties. Owners: Nathaniel Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 14 Guns, 40 Men.

 

1778, September 15 “Hornet.” Commander: William Springer. Bonders: William Springer, mariner, principle; Joseph Laughton, of Boston, and Joseph Choatte, of Newburyport, sureties. Owner: John Tracy. 8 guns, 30 men.

 

1778, September 16 “Hope.” Commander: William Friend, mariner, principle; Joseph Laughton and Joseph Choatte, of Newburyport, sureties. Owners: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. (Captain William Friend with six of his men were drowned in 1781, off Boon Island.) 12 guns, 40 men.

 

1778, Oct 8. By the Flora. Schooner Lovely Lass (Prize) Abraham Topper Master, Nathaniel Tracey Owner, from Newberry to Hispaniola, sent to Rhode Island- with Fish and Lumber. London Gazette 21 November 1778

 

1778, November 17 “Hawke.” Commander: John Calif, of Newburyport. Bonders: John Calif, mariner, principle; Samuel Tucker and John Head, of Newburyport and Boston, sureties. Owners: (Petitioners) Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy and John Tracy, of Newburyport. (The name Calif appears to be an abbreviation for McAuliffe.) 10 guns, 35 men.

 

1779, January 1 “Betsey.” Commander: Nathaniel Bentley. Bonders: Nathaniel Bentley, mariner, principle; Joseph Laughton, of Boston. and John Tracy, of Newburyport, sureties. Owners: John Tracy and others. 6 guns, 20 men.

 

1779, January 4 “Defiance.” Commander: Edward Wigglesworth, of Newburyport. Bonders: Edward Wigglesworth, mariner, of Newburyport, principle. Owner: Nathaniel Tracy, of Newburyport. 6 guns, 12 men.

OR Commander: Jonathan Parsons. Bonders: Jonathan Parsons, mariner, principal; Nathaniel Tracy, of Newburyport, surety. Owner: Nathaniel Tracy. 6 guns, 15 men.

 

“Saucy Jack”

To Benjamin Franklin. Bilbao 17 Aprl. 1779. Sir, I yesterday recd. the Inclosed Letter from Capt. Sargent Ingersoll of the Saucy Jack, Cutter belonging to Mr. Nat Tracy of Newberry Port & myself—by the Capt. Declaration his Vessell Was taken too Nigh the Shore to be a legal prize & Genl. Oriley gives the Capt hopes of recovering her again, tho from the Spirited manner in which the court of Spain have made demands of this sort I confess I have no great hopes myself, yet would not Neglect aney Opportunity of saving my own & partners Intrest should it be convenient to your Honor to mention the affair to the count de Arranda. Perhaps she may be recovred. I expect to Embark onboard Cap. St Barbe for Newberry Port Next week & shall leave this affair in the hands of Messr. Gardoquis who will also write you on the Subject, aney assistance you may think proper to afford them will be ever gratefully acknowledged by Sir Your Most Obt. HI. Servt. Jno Emery

 

1779, June 3 "Friendship" Schooner. Commander: Edward Wigglesworth. Bonders: Edward Wigglesworth, mariner, of Newburyport, principal; John Coffin Jones, of Newburyport, and Joseph Laughton, of Boston, merchants, sureties. Owner: Nath[anie]l Tracy, of Newburyport. 6 Guns, 12 Men.

 

1779, July “Pallas”. Robert Tracy. Treasury pay roll of the brigantine "Pallas," an armed vessel commanded by Capt. James Johnson, for service from July 3, 1779, to Aug. 20, 1779, on Penobscot expedition.

 

1779, October 1 “Tom.” Commander: John Lee, of Newburyport. Bonders: John Lee, of Newburyport, principal; Joseph Laughton and Shrimpton Hunt, jr., of Boston, sureties. Owners: John Tracy and others. 16 guns, 30 men.

[Tom.  Allen:304, NH privateer brigantine, 120 tons, 16 guns, 30 men, Capt John Lee, 1 Oct 1779, owners John Tracy and others.  ND11:265, shown as a British LM ship, 12 guns, 200 tons, captured Friendship, Two Brothers, Warren by 29 Jan 1778.]

 

1779, November 2 By the Hariet. Schooner Eagle, 60 Tons, 5 men, N. Tracey Owner, from Newberry to Philadelphia, stopped off Cape May, with Salt. London Gazette 20 April 1779

 

1779, November 23 “Charming Nancy.” Commander: William Farris, (born in Belfast, Ireland.) Owners: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 8 guns and 20 men.

http://www.awiatsea.com/Other/Hough%20List%20C-D.html

 

sivellusige’

Angers Prisson Decmbr. 11: 1779

Sr. This is to Acquaint you of a person who is a Native of america Propperly beloning to Bostong saild out of Nubery the 7 of June 1779 in a Privetire Caled the sivellusige of fourting Guns Beloning to Mr Tracey Capt Gibings Commander & Was taking in a Prize beloning to the side ship & Carred to England and put in Prisson ware I made my Escape & Came out in a marchant man Bound to Croney shey was called the Goodintent and was taken By a French Privetire & Carride into Brest & put in Prisson Which as I did Not wknow ware or howe to Apply to Which made Lay hear so Long & Sr If you would be so kind as to get my Relisement & send me home in Some ship Beloning to america as I have a wife & Fameley in Bosting you Will greatley oblage your true sugject & Humble Srvt

John sweaney

Addressed: To / Mr Franklin Embasendor / for the thirteen united stats / of America Parress / [in another hand:] a Pasy près Paris

Notations in different hands: John Sweany, Angers Prison Dec. 11. 79 / angers

 

1780, April 5 “Thorn.” Commander: Richard Cowell. Bonders: Richard Cowell, mariner, principal; Joshua Orne, jr., and Samuel Parkman, sureties. Owner: Nathaniel Tracy, Newburyport. 18 guns, 120 men.

[Thorne.  Clark:I:110, Mc:449, DaviesXVI:189, 1094, FW3:836, JA10:25, British ship/sloop of war, 16 guns, captured by the Boston, Capt Tucker, and others, 28 Aug 1779 off Newfoundland.  Allen:299-300, FW3:650, MA ship of war, Capt Daniel Waters, Nov 1779; probably the ship of 18 guns, 120 men, under Capt Richard Cowell, 5 Apr 1780, owner Nathaniel Tracy of Newburyport.  MAS lists crewmen.  JA9:265, possibly the vessel mentioned.  Capture:82-83, Kaminkow:234, 235, sloop, 14 guns,  taken prior to 28 Aug 1782.  SchV:43, she had formerly been taken in 1779 by the Boston and Deane, then retaken by British Hind in Jul 1780, then captured by two French ships Harmion and Astrea which took her to Boston and sold her to William Raymond Lee, who then loaded her for a voyage to L’Orient, on which voyage she was captured Feb 1782 or 20 Aug 1782.  JA10:25, warship.  Volo:171, 268.  Fowler:266.  Silverstone:92.]

 

1780, May 19 “Tracy.” Commander: John B. Hopkins. 16 guns, 100 men.

19 August 1780 Freemans Journal: Captain McCausland was met within 48 hours sail of New York, by an American privateer called the 'Tracey', of 18 guns, by whom he was captured after two hours engagement, in which the 'Jane' had six men killed and nine wounded.

1 Sept 1780 Edinburgh Advertiser: "The Jane, M'Causland, from Cork to New York, was taken by the Tracey American privateer, within a few hours of New York, after an engagement, in which the Jane had 4 men killed, and 9 wounded.

17 Nov 1780 Edinburgh Advertiser: New York, Oct 3. The following privateers are lately arrived:- The Tracey, Capt Hopkins, of 22 guns, and 100 men; and the Hannibal, Capt. Obrien, of 24 guns and 140 men, from Newberry, prizes to the Blonde and Raleigh frigates.

London, August 24,, 1782. Notice is hereby given to the officiers and Company of his Majesty’s Ship Intrepid, Anthony James Pye Molloy Commander, who were actually on Board on the 13th of September, 1780, at taking the Tracey, (in Company withy His Majesty’s Ship Cylops) and the Greyhound (in company with the Raleigh) that they will be paid their respective Shares of the Head-money for those captures, on Board the Ship at Plymouth, in course of next Week; and the money not then demanded will be recalled at the French Horn in Cruched-friars, the first Thursday in every Month for Three Years to come. Samuel Kemble, of New York, Agent. London Gazette 24 August 1782

London, September 19, 1782. Notice is hereby given to the officiers and Company of his Majesty’s Ship Cylops, John Robinson Esq; Commander, who were actually on Board on the 13th of September, 1780, at taking the Tracey, American Privateer, (in Company withy His Majesty’s Ship Intripid) that they will be paid their respective Shares of the Head-money for the said Privateer, on Thursday the 3d Day of October next, at the French Horn, Cruched-friars; and the Shares not then demanded will be recalled at the same place the first Thursday in every Month for Three Years to come. Samuel Kemble, of New York, Agent. London Gazette 17 September 1782

London, August 18, 1783. Notice is hereby given to the officers and Company of his Majesty’s Ships under-memtioned, who were actually on Board at the capture of the following prizes, and who have not received their Proportions at New York, where the same has been in Course of Payment from the First Publication there, agreeable to the Dates under Mentioned: Intrepid and Cycleps, Captain Robinson, for Ship Tracey and Brig Providence – Nov. 1, 1780. London Gazette 16 August 1783

 

1780, May 22 “Pallas.” Commander: Hector McNeil. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 16 guns, 45 men.

 

‘Temple’

From Thomas Digges

London 8 Sept 1780

In Consequence of this passport Mr Robt Temple Charterd The Brig Temple 120 Tonns, no Guns, Capt. Jno Fletcher, 11 Seamen From Mr Tracey at Newbury Port, & binds Himself to Tracey that the Vessel shall be put in safety into a French or Spanish Port—which Mr Temple thought could be effected as a Flag of Truce. This has been refusd Him by Lord G. Germain, the Admiralty, & the board of Sick & Hurts. The papers of the vessel has been seiz'd & lodgd wth the Commissioners of the Customs but the Admiralty have given an order for their restoration & that the Ship shall not be stopd or molested but permitted to depart. But where She is to depart to no one can tell at present. A few British Seamen was permitted to Navigate the vessel home on Condition a like number of Americans here were releasd— These Seamen have been pressd on board Men of War, There are only three persons left on board, & no British Seamen will engage to go in her either to America or a port of France & Spain. As She is allowd to depart, I think the best way to clear Her empty for one port & go into another. We want to get Her to Bilboa, & if She is taken by a French or Spanish Cruiser, Going there, I suppose You will be troubled to get Her releasd— Her flag papers & the vessels being known will secure Her from American Privateers & the English Clearance from all British Cruizers—most likely the vessel will go & trust to these risques...

 

1780, November 23 “Massachusetts.” Commander: John Calif. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 16 guns, 30 men.

 

1780, December 9 “Triton.” (May be meant for Trenton.) Commander: Ebenezer Stocker. Bonders: Nathaniel and John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 4 guns, 12 men.

 

1780, December 12 “Jack and Harry.” Commander: Nathaniel Newell. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 10 guns, 25 men.

1788 May 12. By the Maidstons. The Jack and Harry (prize) John Tracey & Co. Owners, from South Carolina to Newberry Point, taken in Lat. 40.00- Long. 68.00; sent to Rhode Island-with Rice, Indigo , and Cordage. London Gazette 21 November 1778

 

1780, December 12 “Grand Monarch.” Commander: David Coats, Newburyport. Bonders: David Coats, John Tracy and Samuel Newhall, all of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 16 guns, 45 men.

 

1781, January 2 “Thorn.” Commander: Samuel Tucker. Bonders: John Tracy of Newburyport and others. Owners: John Tracy and others. 18 guns, 120 men.

[Thorn.  Allen:301, Paine:459, NR:474, LCP:256/257, ship of 16/18 guns, 120 men, Capt Samuel Tucker of Marblehead in action, 11 Jan 1781 and Aug 1782 (Record 409), owners John Tracy and others of Marblehead.  Capture:7, American privateer operating in 1781 off New England.  C317, captured 19 Aug 1782 by the HMS Arethusa and taken to St Johns.]

 

1781, February 24 “Minerva.” Commander: Moses Brown, of Newburyport. Bonders: John Tracy and others. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, of Newburyport. 16 guns, 60 men.

 

1781, April 14 “Essex.” Commander John Cathcart of Salem. Owners: Jonathan Jackson and others, of Newburyport. 20 guns, 150 men.

 

1781 “Friendship.” Commander: Thomas Tracy. (Boston Gazette, May 7, 1781)

 

1781, May 28 “Hibernia.” Commander: Jeremiah O'Brien, formerly of Machias, Maine, and John O'Brien, Bonder. Owners: Jonathan Jackson. John O'Brien, and others, of Newburyport. 10 guns, 60 men.

 

1781, June 1 “Mercury.” Commander: William Farris, Newburyport (born in Belfast, Ireland.) Bonders: John Tracy and others. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, of Newburyport. 6 guns, 15 men.

 

1781, June 1 “Port Packet.” Commander: George Rappel. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 14 guns, 50 men.

 

1781. June 21 “William.” Commander: Joseph Rowe, Newburyport. Bonders: John Tracy, Newburyport, and others. 8 guns, 25 men.

1778 April 23. By Orpheus . The William (Prize) John Tracey Owner, from Virginia to Newberry, taken at sea, burnt-with grain.London Gazette 21 November 1778.

 

1781, July 23 “Seaflower.” Commander: William Willcomb. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 8 guns, 16 men.

 

1781, July 27 “Grand Monarch.” Commander: John Lee. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 18 guns, 120 men.

 

1781, July 27 “Seaflower.” Commander: William Willcomb. Bonders: Nathaniel and John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 6 guns, 15 men.

 

1781, October 16 “Rochambeau.” Commander: Jonathan Parsons. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 6 guns, 18 men.

 

1781, December 1 “Elizabeth.” Commander: Nathaniel Cutting. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, of Newburyport. 8 guns, 20 men.

 

1781, December 15 “Port Pacquet.” Commander: Ebenezer Stocker. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 12 guns, 30 men.

 

1781, December 15 “Minerva.” Commander: George Rappal. Bonders: Nathaniel Tracy and others. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 16 guns, 40 men.

 

1781, December 22 “Minerva.” Commander: John Lee, Bonders: John Tracy and others, Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, Newburyport. 16 guns, 50 men.

 

1782, April 8 “St. Patrick.” Commander: Philip Trask. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. 10 guns, 25 men.

 

1782, April 8 “Intrepid.” Commander: Moses Brown. Bonders: John Tracy and others, of Newburyport. Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, of Newburyport. 16 guns, 60 men.

 

1782, July 16 “Hibernia.” Commander: Joseph Atkins, Newburyport. Owners: Jonathan Jackson and John O'Brien, of Newburyport. 4 guns, 15 men.

 

1782, November 23 “Queen of France.” Commander: Thomas Tracy. Bonders: Thomas Tracy, John Tracy and William Dyer, also spelled Hyer, Wyer. (Probably Dwyer, correctly). Owners: Nathaniel and John Tracy, all of Newburyport. 8 guns, 20 men.

 

1783, July “Hague”. Thomas Tracey. Receipt dated July 22, 1783, for wages for service to May 10, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. John Manley; also, receipt dated Oct. 27, 1783, for wages for service from May 10, 1783, to Oct. 14, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. Manley.

 

1784. Nathaniel Tracy, Boston, Jan. 30 and ship “Cato”

 

1788, Industry

01-25-1788 Freeman's Oracle (Exeter, New Hampshire)

The sloop Industry, George Morton, master, from Newbury Port, bound to Philadelphia, laden with 350 quintals of dry cod fish, 55 barrels pickled ditto, and 40 barrels oil, is lost on Barney gate shoals: the people saved, but vessel and cargo lost. She belonged to Mr. N. Tracy, of Newbury.

 

Plymouth, April 22, 1809. Notice is hereby given to the officers and Company of his Majesty’s Ship Amethyst, who were on Board at the capture of the American Brig Sally Tracey, on the 24th June 1808, that the Account Sales will be deposited in the Registry of the High Court of Admiralty, pursuant to Act of Parliament. John Hawker. London Gazette 25 April 1809

 

1789-1870 Ship registers of the district of Newburyport, Massachusetts

 

Polly & Betsy, sch. 68 tons; built Massachusetts 1788; length 60 ft 6 in; breadth 18 ft 10 in; depth 7 ft. Reg. April 21, 1797. William Wyer, Jr., Nicholas Tracy, Samuel Brown, Jr., owners; Moses Harris, master

 

Lucy, brig, 152 tons; built Salem, 1792; length 75 ft 10 in; breadth 21 ft 8 in; depth 10 ft 10 in. Reg Oct. 27 1801. Moses Brown, Nicholas Tracy, Samuel Walton of Salisbury, owners; Samuel Walton, Master.

 

Hampshire Gazette (Northampton, Massachusetts) • 09-07-1803

Sums awarded in England

Massachusetts, Newburyport Aug 27. British Adjudications...

Lucy, Wandman, £3179.16, John Baich, Moses Brown, Nich Tracy, Wm Wyer, Jona Gage and Moses Pisbury.

 

Charles?, Aug 6 1794. Moses Brown, Nicholas Tracy, owners; Joseph Perkins, Master.

 

 

Marine List...January 1 to January 29 1799/18 Jan 1799 Edinburgh Advertiser

The Triton, Tracey, from Newfoundland to Bristol, has been deserted at sea. Crew and part of cargo saved.

The Naval Chronicle, Volume 1

 

22 Nov 1816 Edinburgh Advertiser

Leith, Nov 22...Friendship, Tracey, from Jersey, with apples and potatoes...

 

26 December 1816 Freeman’s Journal (Ireland)

The ship Galen, Captain Tracy, which brought the above papers from Boston, arrived off Dover in the extraordinary short period of 19 days.

Nov 1817 The Edinburgh magazine

The American ship Galen, Captain Tracey, lately made her passage from Boston to the Land's End in fourteen days, and to the London Docks in twenty-three days; and a Liverpool vessel lately went a voyage to Savannah in America, took in a cargo, and returned to Liverpool in sixty-nine days.

Nov 1817 The American Monthly

At the late exhibition of the Massachusetts Agricultural Society, at Brighton...A medal of the value of thirty dollars was also awarded to Capt. Charles Tracy, of the ship galen, for his care in bringing out a cow and a calf, belonging to Stephens Williams, Esq. of Northborough...

16 December 1817 Freeman’s Journal (Ireland)

A letter from Boston, of the 15th ultimo, states as follows:- The Galen, Tracy, having met with some damage, in consequence of shifting her birth, has been obliged to go into dock to repair, and will not sail until about the 1st of December.

22 jan 1818

Captain Charles Tracy of the Galen on transferring of three convicts that mutinied on the "Sir Joseph Banks"

 

Charles Tracy was a captain in the Boston-London packet service for many years, with a residence in Boston (Boston City Directory for 1816 and later) He was captain of the ‘Eugene’ in 1804, the ‘Galen’ in 1811 and when Washington Allston was a passenger on it in 1818 and the ‘London Packet’ in the 1820’s.

 

 

Many thanks to: Jessica Gill, Archivist, Newburyport Library, Massachusetts.

 

 

john tracy.jpg

 

One Page from account ledger for work performed by Captain Jonathan Haskell and credited to John Tracy, Esq. for the Sloop Sally. Newburyport March 1786.

 

 

 

References:

 

Allen, Gardner Weld (1927) Massachusetts Privateers of the Revolution. The Massachusetts Historical Society. [View]

Bayley, W.H. & Jones, O.O. (1906) History of the Marine Society Newburyport Massachusetts...[View extracts on Thomas Tracy]

Beaudry, Mary C.  (1998) Farm Journal: First Person, Four Voices. Historical Archaeology, 32(1):20-33

Beaudry, Mary C. (2008) “Above Vulgar Economy”: The Intersection of Historical Archaeology and Microhistory in Writing Archaeological Biographies of Two New England Merchants. In Small Worlds: Twelve Studies in Microhistory, ed. by James Brooks, Christopher DeCorse, and John Walton, 173–198. School of Advanced Research Press, Santa Fe, NM.

Beaudry, Mary C. (2010) Privy to the Feast: Eighty to Supper Tonight. In Table Settings: The Material Culture and Social Context of Dining in the Old and New Worlds AD1700–1900, ed. by James Symonds, 62–79. Oxbow Books, Oxford.

Bowling, Kenneth R.;  DiGiacomantonio, William Charles;  Bickford, Charlene Bangs (1997) Petition histories: Revolutionary War related claims. Volume 7. Johns Hopkins University Press, Virginia.

Brissot de Warville, Jacques-Pierre (1792). New travels in the United States of America. Performed in 1788.  J. P. Brissot de Warville. Translated from the French. Dublin, MDCCXCII. [1792]. 491 pp.

Cahill, Thomas Peter (1942) The famous Tracys: Ship merchantmen and privateer captains of Newburyport, Mass., in the American Revolution, 1775-1783 ; the greatest record of achievement by one family of maritime merchants and privateers in colonial history. Battle of the Brig, Yankee Hero, commanded by Captain James Tracy, of Newburyport, with the Btitish frigate Milford off Cape Ann, May 7, 1776. Captain Jeremiah O'Brien's Memorial Associates, Somerville, Mass. Pamphlet 12 pages.(Also published in The Irish Echo (NYC) 18-25th October 1941)

Chase, Theodore (1988) Harvard Student Disorders in 1770. The New England Quarterly, Vol. 61, No. 1 (Mar., 1988), pp. 25-54

Chauncy, Charles (1743) Seasonable thoughts on the state of religion in New-England, a treatise in five parts. Boston, 1743.

Clark, William Bell (1938) Gallant John Barry 1745-1803. The Story Of A Naval Hero Of Two Wars. The Macmillan Company, NY.

Cleaveland, Nehemiah (1863) The First Century of Dummer Academy: A Historical Discourse. P. 60

Coffin, Joshua & Joseph Bartlett, Joseph: A Sketch of the History of Newbury, Newburyport, and West Newbury, from 1635 ...

Copy of last will and testament for Patrick Tracy dated 16th October 1788.

Crimmins, John D. (1902) St. Patrick’s Day. New York.

Currier, John J (1906) History of Newburyport, Mass. 1764-1905.

Cushing, Caleb (1826) History and Present State of the town of Newburyport. Newburyport.

D’Arcy McGee, Thomas (1852) A History of the Irish Settlers in North America. Patrick Donohoe, Boston. 2nd edition. p.206, 217

Deane, Charles; Perkins A. T.and  Holmes,  Oliver Wendell. December Meeting, 1878. Portraits by Blackburn; Portraits by Smibert; Pequot Indians; Mr. Motley's Memoir; Memoir of John Lothrop Motley; Addenda to Portraits. Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol. 16 (1878), pp. 380-475

Galvin, John T. (1996) The gentleman Mr. Shattuck: a biography of Henry Lee Shattuck, 1879-1971. Boston.

Griffin, Martin I. J. (1903) Commodore John Barry, "The Father of the American Navy": The Record of His Services for Our Country. Philadelphia: Published by the author, 1903. 424 pp.

Hays, Minis I ed. (1908) Calendar of the papers of Benjamin Franklin in the library of the American Philosophical Society. American Philosophical Society, Philadelphia.

Jones, Alvin Lincoln (1894) Under colonial roofs. Boston. [View]

Labaree, Benjamin W. (1975) Patriots & Partisans - The Merchants of Newburyport 1764-1815.

Lee, TA (1916) Nathaniel Tracy, Harvard, 1769. The Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Boston Vol. 25 pp. 193-7 [View]

Lee, Thomas Amory (1916) Colonel Jeremiah Lee, Patriot. Essex Institute Historical Collections, Salem, Mass. [View]

Lee, Thomas Amory (1921) The Tracy Family of Newburyport. Essex Institute Historical Collections 57 (January 1921) L 58. [View]

Lunt, Paul. February Meeting, 1872. Paul Lunt's Book; Proceedings of the Massachusetts Historical Society, Vol. 12 (1871 - 1873), pp. 191-211

Maclay, Edgar Stanton (1904) Moses Brown, Captain U.S.N. Baker and Taylor Co.

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors Revolutionary War. A Compilation from the Archives In accordance with Chapter 100, Resolves of 1891. Wright & Potter Printing Co., State Printers, Boston, 1907.

Morehouse Dawn M. (2008) Copley's Compromise: Navigating the Discourse of Beauty and Likeness in colonial Boston

Naval Documents of the American Revolution. U S Govt Printing Office, 2005

O'Brien, Michael J. (1999) A Hidden Phase of American History: Ireland's Part in America's Struggle for ...Heritage Books.

Paine, Sarah Cushing (1912)  Paine Ancestry. The Family Of Robert Treat Paine, Signer Of The Declaration Of Independence Including Maternal Lines. Boston, Mass.

Putnam, James Jackson (1905) A memoir of Dr. James Jackson; with sketches of his father, Hon. Jonathan Jackson, and his brothers, Robert, Henry, Charles, and Patrick Tracy Jackson; and some account of their ancestry.Houghton Mifflin & Co, Boston & NY.

Rebora, Carrie, Paul Staiti, Erica E. Hirshler, Theodore E. Stebbins Jr., and Carol Troyen, with contributions by Morrison H. Heckscher, Aileen Ribeiro, and Marjorie Shelley (1995) John Singleton Copley in America. Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)

Romans, Bernard (1775) A concise natural history of East and West Florida; containing an account of the natural produce of all the southern part of British America. New-York, M,DCC,LXXV. [1775].

Schutz, John A. (1997) Legislators of the Massachusetts General Court, 1691-1780: a biographical dictionary. UPNE.

Smith, Euphemia Vale (1854) History of Newburyport: From the Earliest Settlement of the Country to the present time.

The Journal of the American-Irish Historical Society, Volume 17

Weitenkampf, Frank William Coolidge Lane, George Edward Woodberry, William Hogarth, Henry Clay Badger, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Andrew McFarland Davis, Harvard University. Library,

Wheeler, George Augustus  And Wheeler, Henry Warren (1878) History of Brunswick, Topsham, and Harpswell: Part II, Chapter 26 Military History of the Three Towns

Willcomb, Oliver Clifton (1902) Genealogy of the Willcomb family of New England (1655-1902). Lynn, Mass.

Winsor, Justin; Farlow, William Gilso; Trelease William (1886) A bibliography of William Hogarth. Library of Harvard University, 1886

 

Online General Reference:

 

American War of Independence -  at sea

http://www.awiatsea.com/

 

Grave Stones

 

 

image001

 

Underneath are the remains of

Patrick Tracy, Esquire

Who departed this life,

Febraury 28th 1789

Aged 78 years.

In various and strongly Contrasted

Scenes of Life,

He eminently shone as a man,

A citizen and a Christian.

His firm expectation of a future existence

Moderated his Temper in Prosperity

Supported Him in Adversity

And enabled him

To triumph

In Death.

St. Paul's Episcopal Cemetery

 

 

image003

 

Here lies Buried
the Body of
Mrs Hannah Tracey wife
to Mr Patrick Tracey
Aged 33 Years who died
August 20th 1756

St. Paul's Episcopal Cemetery

 

nat.jpg

Nathaniel Tracy 1751 - 1796
Financier of the American Revolution
One of the wealthiest merchants in Newburyport at the start of the Revolution. His father built a house for him on State Street now the Public Library. He sent large sums to equip ships as Privateers and Letters-of-Marque for the Revolution.

The Old Burying Hill (or Old Hill Burying Ground)

 

 

81889930_132374151563.jpg

John Tracy Esq

died May 1, 1815

aged 62

John Tracy his son

died in Matanzas Cuba

august 28 1822

aged 36

St. Paul's Episcopal Cemetery

 

 

capt nic.jpgcap nic38.jpg

In Memory of
Capt. Nicolas Tracy
who departed this
Life May ye 23d
1787

Aetatis 61

The Old Burying Hill (or Old Hill Burying Ground)

 

 

capt nic2.jpg

Sacred

to the

memory of

Ms Miriam Tracy

relict of the late

Capt Nicolas Tracy

who departed this life

October 28 1810

Aged 78 years

The Old Burying Hill (or Old Hill Burying Ground)

 

 

rob.jpg

This

stone is

erected in

memory of

Mr Robert Tracy

who departed this life

December 16 1801

aged 53 years

The Old Burying Hill (or Old Hill Burying Ground)

 

 

 

 

 

Journals of the House of Representatives of Massachusetts

 

The Petitions of Thomas Boylston, Patrick Tracey and Fortescue Vernon, representing the unjust and illegal Seizures of their Vessels at New-Providence, and praying the interposition of this Court in that Affair.

Read and committed to Mr. Cubing, Mr. Atkins, Mr. Otis, Mr. Brown of Salem, and Capt. Sheaffe, to consider and report respectively.

...Pass'd in Council; Viz. In Council June 1. 1765. Read and sent down.

 

The Petitions of Thomas Boyistlon, Patrick Tracey, & Petitions of Fortescue Vernon, were read again, and Ordered, That Mr. Cushing, Mr. Atkins, Mr. Otis, Mr. Brown of Salem, and Capt. Sheaffe, with such as the honorable Board shall join, be a Committee to take these Petitions under Consideration and Report. Sent up for Concurrence.

 

Ordered, That Col. Bourn, be of the Committee on the Petition of Capt. Tracey, and others, in the room of Mr. Otis, who desires to be excused from that Service. Sent up for  Concurrence.

 

Harrison Gray, Esq; brought down the draft of a Letter, reported by a Committee of both Houses on Petitions of Mess'rs Boyleton, Vernon, and Tracey, to be sent to Richard Jackson, Esq;

Pass'd in Council, Viz. In Council June 18. 1765. Read and accepted, and Ordered, That the Secretary cause a fair draft of the foregoing Letter to be made, that he sign the same in the Name of the General Court, and transm it to Richard Jackson, Esq; together with the Copies of the Petitions therein refer'd to.

Sent down for Concurrence. Read and Concurr'd.

 

 

 

The reconstituted North End Papers, 1618-1880

Oliver Merrill drew his findings from the registry of wills and deeds at Salem; the town records of Newbury and Newburyport; files of old newspapers, back to 1792, and a variety of published sources. Merrills research yielded genealogical entries like the following:

 

The lot of land upon which Thomas built the hospital building was a part of the estate of Patrick Tracy. In 1769 Mr. Tracy bought of John Wood four acres and 74 rods of land . . . In 1771 he also bought two acres and 72 rods adjoining from the heirs of Archelaus Adams . . . Mr. Tracy, in his will, left this land to the children of John Tracy. It could not be sold for money until these children came of age, but could be exchanged for other property of equal value . . . several lots of land were disposed of in this way, namely two lots on High Street and two on Broad and finally the remainder of the field was bought by Judge Charles Jackson in exchange for a house and 20 acres of land.

 

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

Patrick Tracy Jackson papers,

II. Jackson, Tracy & Tracy records, 1774-1784
Arranged chronologically.

The partnership between Jonathan Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, and John Tracy lasted from 1774 to 1777. A ledger, daybook, and single page ledger of Jackson, Tracy & Tracy accounts comprise this series. The ledger, 1774-1787, includes accounts of the brig Elizabeth, and the sloops Mermaid, Conway and Lively, and accounts with many merchants and artisans in Massachusetts and New England. The bulk of the ledger's accounts date from 1774-1777, and most of the entries that date after the dissolution of the partnership are from accounts settled in 1783 and 1784 after the Revolution. The single page ledger summarizes profit and loss for the firm's many ships, including those mentioned in the bound ledger.

Box 1     Folder 1 "Profit & Loss in J. T. & T's Ledger," n.d.

Vol. 5 (XT)          Jackson, Tracy & Tracy ledger, 11 Apr. 1774 - 9 Aug. 1787

Vol. 6                   Jackson, Tracy & Tracy daybook, 5 Jan. 1775 - 17 Dec. 1776

III. Papers relating to Jonathan Jackson and the Tracys, 1781-1785
Arranged chronologically.

This series contains a daybook, privateering account book, and stock and invoice book dating from the period after the dissolution of Jackson, Tracy & Tracy in 1777. The daybook and privateering account book are unidentified, but include both Jackson and the Tracys. The privateering account book contains accounts of the brigs Hibernia and Pallas. The Tracys kept the stock and invoice book, which includes accounts for sundry goods and merchandise. For Jonathan Jackson invoices from this period, see also Vol. 3.

Vol. 7                                     Daybook, Newburyport, 1 Jan. 1781 - 3 Jan. 1783

Box 1     Folder 2 Vol. 8         Privateering account book, Jun. 1781 - May 1783

                             Vol. 9         Nathaniel and John Tracy stock and invoice book, 20 Mar. 1784-8 Oct. 1785

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

Lee family papers

Reel 18, Vol. 3-4, Jonathan Jackson letterbooks, 1765-1780

Letterbooks of Jonathan Jackson containing copies of letters to Edmund Quincy, Samuel and Jonathan Smith, Henry and Thomas Bromfield, Henry Cruger, George Brown, Peter Contencin, Isaac Sears, Stephen Sayre, Pelatiah Webster, Martin Brimmer, Thomas and Isaac Wharton, Simon Fraser, Edmund Freeman, Robert Jenkins, Joseph Gardoqui, Samuel Newhall, John Morss, James Tracy, Philip Livingston, Simeon Mayhew, Richard Derby, Jr., Henry Crouch, Hector McNeill, and others. Subjects include colonial mercantile affairs and business transactions; the formation and dissolution of the firm of Jackson & John Bromfield and the formation of Jackson, (Nathaniel) Tracy & (John) Tracy; American opposition to the Stamp Acts and other parliamentary restrictions on shipping; the Continental Congress and nonimportation of British goods; trade with Spain and the West Indies; shipping during the American Revolution; privateering; the capture of the ship Yankee Hero and subsequent prisoner exchange, 1776; and Jonathan Jackson's opinions on taxation, war, and peace.

III. Bound volumes, 1764-1898
Arranged alphabetically by author or owner.

The bulk of this series consists of account books, blotters, cash books, ledgers, letterbooks, memorandum books, and waste books of various family business firms, including those of Joseph Lee and George Cabot; Patrick Tracy Jackson and John Bromfield; Patrick Tracy Jackson, Nathaniel Tracy, and John Tracy; Joseph Lee, Jr., and Henry Lee; and Thomas Lee, Jr. The volumes contain considerable information on mercantile business practices in the world, 1760-1860, as well as on the China, India, European, South American, and West Indian trades. Some of the volumes have been removed to boxes.

Reel 1, Box 1, Folder 13, Jan.-June 1787 “Nathaniel Tracy”

Includes bills, invoices, and receipts of Joseph Lee & Co., Lee & Cabot, and Jackson & Higginson, as well as delivery orders for the brig Betsy.

Reel 1, Box 1, Folder 16, 1788

Correspondents include John Burke and John A. Lowell. Subjects include the wreck of the Betsy off Jamaica. Cargo lists, an account of losses and a list of salvaged and sold goods of the Betsy, and the will of Patrick Tracy (ie copy dated 16th October 1788).

Reel 1, Box 1, Folder 17, 1789 “Patrick Tracy”

Correspondents include Richard Clarke, Andrew Cabot, John A. Lowell, and Mary Jackson. Subjects include the estate of Elizabeth Cabot and the apparent recovery from illness of King George and his resumption of power.

Reel 1, Box 1, Folder 18,, 1790-1791 “John Tracy”

Correspondence from Jonathan Jackson and Tobias Lear. Subjects include the taking of the census in the district of Massachusetts under the direction of Marshal Jonathan Jackson.

Reel 35-36, Vol. 112-113, , Joseph Lee, Jr., letterbooks, 1793-1808

Letterbooks of Joseph Lee, Jr., and Henry Lee containing copies of letters to James Duff, E.H. Derby, Jr., John Stille, William Wyman, Jacob Crowninshield, John White, John Williams, Samuel Cabot, Thomas Lee, Jr., Peter Remsen, Rufus Bigelow, Robert Cabot, Nathaniel Bowditch, Israel Thorndike, Francis Lee, Samuel Williams, William Oliver, John Tracy, Jr., Frederic Cabot, Samuel Yorke, Patrick Tracy Jackson, and others. Subjects include Lee business, the India trade, European markets, the Embargo Act, and the prospects for war with Great Britain.

Reel 18-19, Vol. 11-16, , Patrick Tracy Jackson letterbooks, 1802-1826
Vol. 11-13 removed to Box A, Folders 2-4.

Letterbooks of Patrick Tracy Jackson containing letters to Ebenezer Parlay, Ram Duloll Day, Joseph Cutler, Joseph Lee, Jr., Francis C. Lowell, Andrew Cabot, Stephen Higginson, Joseph G. Chamberlain, Peter Remsen, Elihu Doty, Samuel Williams, William Bartlett, Henry Lee, Samuel Cabot, George Lee, Isaac Lawrence, Samuel Yorke, James Schott, E.A. Newton, William Oliver, John Tracy, Jr., Albert Gallatin, Thomas Lee, Jr., David Moody, Christopher Gore, Cornelius Coolidge, James Lloyd, Rufus King, and others. Subjects include the India trade, trade with the West Indies, the trading policies of Emperor Henry Christophe of Haiti, the Embargo Act of 1807, the Non-Intercourse Law of 1809, and the War of 1812 and their effect on shipping and the beginnings of the Merrimack Manufacturing Company and Lowell, Mass. The volume contains very few letters after 1813.

Reel 21-23, Vol. 39-48, , Henry Lee letterbooks, 1804-1852

Letterbooks containing copies of letters to Nathaniel Cabot Lee, Joseph Lee, Jr., John Lewis Brown, Patrick Tracy Jackson, Samuel Williams, Arthur Spear, Israel Thorndike, Thaddeus Mayhew, Peter Remsen, Samuel Yorke, William H. Savage, Henry Higginson, Joseph Hall, Jr., Andrew Cabot, Antonio de Frias, William Oliver, George Lee, Ozias Goodwin, Samuel Cabot, Jr., E.A. Newton, William A. Newton, Francis C. Lowell, Thomas H. Perkins, Thomas Lee, Jr., James Russell, Francis Lee, John J. Trowbridge, Charles Williams, James MacKillop, Baboo Delsock Roy, John Tracy, James Williams, R.P. Ochterlony, Charles D. Miles, Richard C. Cabot, James Schott, James B. Higginson, Richard Burr, Clement C. Biddle, J. Horsley Palmer, Thomas Thornely, Alexander Turnbull, David Henshaw, George R. Minot, George Brown, J.J. Dixwell, and others. Also included are letters from Ozias Goodwin, Patrick Tracy Jackson, Andrew Cabot, Thomas H. Perkins, and others. Subjects include the India trade; the coronation of Napoleon; the effects of British Orders-in-Council, Napoleonic trade decrees, the American Non-Intercourse Act, and the War of 1812 on shipping; the various revolutions in Spanish America; French, Indian, Portuguese, Italian, and Arab trading practices; the opium trade; cotton; the China trade; and Henry Lee's opinions on the War of 1812, the cotton trade, currency, the tariff, and general economic matters. There are no letterbooks for 1806-1809, 1819-1834, or 1836-1839.

Reel 41, Vol. 156, , John Tracy, Jr., memorandum book, 1810

Memorandum book of John Tracy, Jr., containing memoranda on the goods of Calcutta, Ceylon, Muscat, and other ports.

Reel 40, Vol. 149-150, , Thomas Lee, Jr., letterbooks, 1817-1831

Letterbooks of Thomas Lee, Jr., containing copies of letters to George Knight, Peter Remsen, George Williams, Abbott Lawrence, James Drake, John Tracy, Jr., John H. Cabot, Thomas Wright, Samuel Williams, Charles W. Story, John Harrod, Ephraim Thayer, Edward W. Waldo, James Moorfield, Henry Lee, Edward Dorr, Lambert Dexter, Martin Van Buren, and others. Subjects include Havana and European trade. The letters to Van Buren relate to the loss of ships in a bombardment of Antwerp by the Netherlands during the Belgian Revolution, 1830.

Reel 3, Box 3, Folder 5, 1830 “Nancy Tracy”

Correspondence from Henry Lee, Mary Jackson Lee, George McDuffie, and Clement C. Biddle. Subjects include Lee family matters and Boston social life. Biddle letter to McDuffie, 10 June 1830, is a lengthy discussion of government disbursements and political economy. Inventory of the property of Thomas Lee.

Reel 9, Box 9, Folder 15, 1896

Correspondence from James J. Higginson, J. Henry Lea, Charles C. Smith, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr., Anna C. Granger, E.H. Clement, Pen Hallowell, Walter K. Watkins, Edward Wheelwright, Curtis Guild, Jr., and George G. Tarbell. Subjects include the Lee, Tracy, and Jackson genealogy; Jonathan Sewall letters; Governor Andrew and the Massachusetts Volunteers; Harvard affairs; and state and national politics.

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

Smith-Carter family papers

Deed from Nathaniel Tracy to Isaac Smith, 26 June 1787

Deed of sale from Nathaniel Tracy (Newburyport) to William Smith for property at Pownalborough, 26 June 1787

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

correspondents in the Winthrop Sargent papers

John Tracy, Mass., Newburyport merchant.

1 Apr. 1789

15 May 1789

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

7 Dec. 1791 Letter from John Tracy (Newburyport) to John Hancock asking him to indemnify Capt. Joseph Wells in the matter of a stowaway slave.

http://www.masshist.org/database/query3.cfm?queryID=600

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

Nathaniel Cutting journal and letterbooks, 1786-1798.

Journal in 2 bound vols. and 18 folios, and 3 letterbooks of Nathaniel Cutting, shipmaster and commercial agent of Newbury (Mass.) merchant Nathaniel Tracy at Havre and confidential diplomatic agent for the Dept. of State. Journal, kept from 7 July 1786 - 12 Nov. 1793 (with gaps), includes observations on the French Revolution, his activities in the slave trade and other commercial interests, the slave insurrections in Santo Domingo (Hispaniola), and a 1793 mission as Vice-Consul with Colonel David Humphreys to the Dey of Algiers.

The letterbooks (3 vols., 1789-1798) contain commercial letters; information on political affairs in France and Europe, including the French Revolution and the XYZ Affair; and letters from Santo Domingo about the slave insurrections. The bulk of the letters are written to Peter C. Brooks, Pierce Butler, Thomas Jefferson, James Monroe, Thomas H. Perkins, Timothy Pickering, Edmund Randolph, James Swan, and Nathaniel Tracy.

 

Massachusetts Historical Society.

Adams Family Correspondence.

 

1 Nov. 1783 041278 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane; also a duplicate, with 2 enclosures. Newbury Port. 4 p., 4 p..

25 Nov. 1783 041343 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to [John Lane]; also a duplicate. Newburyport. 3 p., 3 p..

25 Nov. 1783 to 2 Jan. 1784 041344 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane. 1 p..

1783 to 24 Feb. 1784 041428 pink | Nathaniel & John Tracy. . Newbury Port. Account with Lane, Son, & Fraser. 3 p..

2 Jan. 1784 041448 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane; also a duplicate. Newburyport. 2 p., 3 p..

4 Aug. 1784 041969 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. London. 6 p..

30 Sep. 1784 042068 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. London. 4 p..

12 Nov. 1784 042158 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. Paris. 3 p..

19 Nov. 1784 042164 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to JA. Paris. 4 p..

19 Nov. 1784 430031 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Lane, Son & Fraser. Paris. 4 p..

24 Nov. 1784 042174 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane. Paris. 3 p..

6 Dec. 1784 042197 pink | [Nathaniel Tracy] to John Lane. Paris. 2 p..

8 Dec. 1784 042199 pink | N[athaniel] T[racy] to John Laneand Nicholas Lane. Paris. 2 p..

5 Jan. 1785 050010 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. Promissory Note. London. 1 p..

Jan. 1785 050062 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. Great Ormond Street. 2 p. [fragment].

Jan. 1785 050063 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane Son & Fraser. Great Ormond Street. 4 p..

25 Feb. 1785 050109 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son & Fraser. Promissory Note. London. 1 p..

28 Feb. 1785 050113 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane Son & Fraser. Promissory Note.. London. 1 p..

28 Feb. 1785 050114 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser. Promissory Note. London. 1 p..

28 Feb. 1785 to Mar. 1787 050115 pink | Nathaniel Tracy. . Account with Lane, Son & Fraser. 3 p..

18 Mar. 1785 050182 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser; also a duplicate and 1 enclosure. London. 5 p., 2 p..

18 Aug. 1785 050840 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to [John Lane]. Newburyport. 3 p..

18 Aug. 1785 050841 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane, with 2 enclosures. Newburyport. 6 p..

Sep. 1785 051072 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to [Messrs. Lane, Son, & Fraser], also a duplicate. 3 p., 4 p..

9 Nov. 1785 051263 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane. Boston. 3 p..

1785 051471 pink | Nathaniel Tracy. . General Statement. 3 p..

1785 051472 pink | Nathaniel Tracy. . Estimate of Estate. 3 p..

7 Feb. 1786 051587 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to Thomas Fraser. 2 p..

Nov. 1786 to 23 Nov. 1787 053181 pink | John Laneand Nathaniel Tracy. . Boston. Account current with Thomas Russell. 2 p..

1786 052461 pink | Nathaniel Tracy. . Estimates and loose memoranda of account. 10 p..

13 July 1787 052898 pink | Nathaniel Tracy to John Lane. Boston. 8 p..

14 July 1818 181586 yellow | N. Tracy to JQA. Boston. 2 p..

 

 

 

Portsmouth Athenaeum

Whipple Traill Spence Collection, 1728-1809 - MS074

Provenance: The letters comprising MS74 were passed down from Mary (Whipple) Traill to daughter Mary (Traill) Spence then to her daughter Harriet Spence Lowell, and later to Frances Lowell Burnett (1914-2001) who donated them to the Portsmouth Athenaeum in 2001. Frances Lowell Burnett lived in Manchester-by-the-Sea , MA . Genealogy chart and transcriptions were done by donor.

Folder 7 Lowell Family: copies of articles on the Lowells including James Russell Lowell (1819-1891), copy of deed, 1771 J[ohn] Lowell (1743-1802), Newburyport merchant, to Patrick Tracy for dwelling in Newburyport. Handwritten notes.

 

 

 

The Library of Congress

 

George Washington to Nathaniel Tracy, September 2, 1775 (1775-09-02) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

George Washington to Nathaniel Tracy, September 2, 1775, Orders (1775-09-02) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

Joseph Reed to Nathaniel Tracy, September 7, 1775 (1775-09-07) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

Joseph Reed to Nathaniel Tracy, September 7, 1775 (1775-09-07) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

George Washington to Nathaniel Tracy, November 12, 1778 (1778-11-12) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

George Washington to Nathaniel Tracy, November 12, 1778 (1778-11-12) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript)  Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

 

Thomas Jefferson to N. Tracy, December 1, 1792 (1792-12-01) (Book, Periodical, Manuscript) Source: U.S. Historical, Cultural Collections

To Nathaniel Tracy

Philadelphia Dec. 1. 1792.

Dear Sir

Mr. Joy, who is the subject of your letter of Oct. 27. has been nominated to the Consulship of Calcutta. In acknoleging the receipt of your letter I am happy in the occasion of renewing your remembrance of me, and of assuring you of the constant and unabated esteem I have entertained for you from the commencement of our peregrination together. Accept this tribute of friendship from Dear Sir your’s affectionately & sincerely

Th: Jefferson

jefferson.jpg

 

 

Letters of Delegates to Congress: Volume 12 February 1, 1779 - May 31, 1779
Samuel Holten's Diary

[March 10, 1779]
10. Wednesday. I dined with Genl. Lee, Mr. Adams, Mr. Gerry, Genl Whipple & Colo. Lee, dined with the General. N.B. The diner & the economy of his house was as odd as the Genl is.

MS (MDaAr).
Marine Committee to Jackson, Tracey & Tracey
Gentlemen (1) March 10th, 1779
This Committee have very important public reasons for developing with great certainty and exactness, the origin, progress and designs of Captain Conyngham and the Cutter he commanded called the Revenge. By Captain Conyngham's narrative it appears to the Committee that many Prizes taken by him have been addressed to your House, in consequence of which the Committee request of you Gentlemen that you will Send them by the next post after you receive this an account of what Prizes have arrived to your address from Captain Conyngham, and for what and how they have been disposed-And also a Copy of All the Instructions you may have received from any person whatever concerning such Prizes. The honorable mention that has been made of you Gentlemen to the Committee, induces me to beleive that you will excuse the trouble that may arise from furnishing the particular account above desired, as the public service demands it.
I have the honor to be Gentlemen, Your very hble servant,
Richard H. Lee Chairman
LB (DNA: PCC Miscellaneous Papers, Marine Committee Letter Book).

 

 

 

Acts and laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

 

Chapter 37

RESOLVE ON THE PETITION OF JOHN TRACY, GRANTING HIM ONE THOUSAND SIX HUNDRED POUNDS, IN FULL FOR HIS ACCOUNT, FOR THE USE OF THE BRIGANTINE PALLAS, ON THE PENOBSCOT EXPEDITION.

 

On the petition of John Tracy, praying that he may be allowed his account for the rise of his vessel, and for ship stores expended in the expedition at Penobscot:

 

Resolved, That there be allowed and paid out of the treasury of this Commonwealth, to John Tracy, Esq ; ("in Treasurer's notes, bearing date the first of January, 1781) the sum of One thousand six hundred pounds, in full of his account for the use of the said vessel and ship stores expended in the said expedition. June 23, 1784.

 

Chapter 38.

RESOLVE ALLOWING INTEREST ON THE NOTE MENTIONED IN 1 A ESOLUTION OF COURT PASSED YESTERDAY, IN FAVOR OF JOHN TRACY, ESQ.

 

Resolved, That the note which by a resolution of the General Court passed yesterday, was directed to be made to John Tracy, Esq; for the sum of One thousand six hundred pounds, to bear date the first of January, 1781, shall be on interest from that time and issued as the consolidated notes of this Commonwealth. June 24, 1784.

 

 

Papers of the War department

 

June 4, 1789

Author Name John Tracy (primary)

Recipient Name Henry Knox (primary) Location: New York

Summary Letter, Tracy recommends candidates for appointment.

Document Format Autograph Letter Signed

Related Persons/Groups Henry Knox; John Tracy; Stephen Gross; Dalton; King; Gerry; Gen Titcomb; ;

Related Places New York; Western Territory; Brigadier Island in Penobscot; NewYork; ;

Keywords property of my children; father's will; United States; selling a good farm; present settlers are to remain on the island; settled by their purchaser or you; purchase; import officer; Independence; faithful servant to the government; humanity; character; congress; Gentlemen at the head of this department; sacrifices of time & property during the whole of the last war; compensation; Continent or Commonwealth; head of the Militia; continental & militai troops; punctuality; forwarding provisions; worth a very handsome estate; depreciation of our papers; support his decline of life; Naval Officer for this port; pounds; Private friendship is hardly a sufficient apology for the liberty; interest & influence in keeping an office;

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/document.php?id=3590

 

December 21, 1789

Author Name John Tracy (primary) Location: Newbury Port

Recipient Name Henry Knox (primary)

Summary Letter, asks for Customs appointment; mentions loss of Knox's son.

Document Format Autograph Letter Signed

Document Notes [not available]

Content Notes [not available]

Related Persons/Groups Henry Knox; John Tracy; Dalton; King; ;

Related Places Newbury Port; Western Country; ;

Keywords write on the subject; gentleman; Collector of Excise; character every way equal to the importance of that office; influence; friendship; endeavour'd to bare our misfortunes with credit and reputation; affluence; politeness and attention in our power; sacrificing the flower of their life in the field; emboldened to apply; faithful servant; fully earn the support allowed; distressed situation; apology; condole with you and your lady in the loss of your little one; mortification; real estate; equal value to be determined by three persons appointed by the Judge of Probate; effect an exchange; sell for such a trifle at present; disposition to settle; purchase an estate in that country under cultivation; trade; statute of bankruptcy; large house and ten acres of land; furniture; property; labour; attention; confidence I placed was my ruin; happy in sinking or swimming; credit of honesty attention and industry when in business; connection which is dearer to me than life; application; opening in the Customs; answer every purpose of giving me the necessaries and conveniences of life; sorry to have occasion to give any my friends trouble or anxiety for me or my family; time is so fully occupied; father has so left my childrens estate; prospect; prosecuting my intention of settleing in the Western Country;

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/document.php?id=3919

 

Date March 2, 1790 

Author Name King (primary)

Recipient Name Nathaniel Tracy (primary)

Summary Letter, Messrs King and Gerry discuss the personal debts of Major Gibbs with Nathaniel Tracy.

Related Persons/Groups Nathaniel Tracy; multiple; Major Gibbs; Edwards; R. King; E. Gerry; ;

Related Places New York; Hartford; Boston; ;

Keywords discountenance; conduct of prevail upon him to abandon it; creditors in expectation of relief from your other friends; more obstinate in their efforts after this success; benefitted by his manoeuvre; now is the time to put a stop to such a procedure; happy to supply with any monies necessary for your expences; consider as the inevitable consequence of signing a law; another objection as it respects your future situation; payment of that sum would have the desirable effect of liberating you from all your several embarrassments; do every thing in our power to effect it; consequence of paying; adoption of similar measure; sudden and unexpected departure of you prevented me from meeting you on the subject of the session; disapprobation at the conduct of Major Gibbs so far as we are acquainted with the circumstances; averse to taking on ourselves the payment of his debt and thus rewarding an act which we are constrained to condemn;

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/document.php?id=4125

 

January 4, 1791 

Author Name John Tracey (primary) Location: Newbury Port

Recipient Name Henry Jackson (primary) Location: Boston

Summary Letter, asks for recommendation to appointment; mentions Revolutionary war.

Document Format Autograph Letter Signed

Related Persons/Groups Henry Jackson; John Tracey; Dalton; ;

Related Places Boston; Newbury Port; Massachusetts; ;

Keywords write as soon as convenience will admit to your friend the Secretary of War; recommend me to the President of the United States; relying on your friendship & assistance; organizing, inspecting and reviewing the militia has been my duty and study for the last few years of my life; flatter myself I have conducted with industry and honor; enquiry of the officers of the division; pretend to vie with those who have bben on a Continental Establishment; put myself equal to any of my brothers in the line that I am in; find I am the oldest inspecting officer of the militia in the state; abilities & character are sufficient; pretensions that in addition to the loss of my property in consequence of the late revolution; since you was in town I have maturely considered the subject of our conversation respecting my applying for the place of Inspector for the District of Massachusetts; ;

http://wardepartmentpapers.org/document.php?id=4797

 

 

Massachusetts Archives Collection

1771/04/01 Address To Gov. Hutchinson From The Minister And Wardens Of The Episcopal Church At Newbury Congratulating Him On His Appointment As Governor And Requesting That The "Plate" Given By The King On Such An Event And Traditionally Bestowed Upon One Of The Episcopal Churches Of The Province Be Bestowed Upon The Church Of Newbury.

Bass, Edward, Autograph

Dalton, Tristram, Autograph

Jenkins, John, Autograph

Tracy, Nicholas, Autograph

http://www.sec.state.ma.us/ArchivesSearch/RevolutionaryDetail.aspx?VolNbr=014&Page=615

 

1638-1840 Essex County, MA: Probate File Papers

 

6th September 1811. Know all men by these presents, That we Lydia Tracy, widow, Andrew Frothingham, merchant and Charles Hodge, mariner, all of Newburyport in the county of Essex...onto Samuel Holten...twenty thousand dollars...office of Judge of the Probate of wills...guardian  unto Elizabeth Tracy, a minor aged fifteen years, Eleanor St. Barbe Tracy, a minor aged twelve years, Henrietta Louisa Tracy, a minor aged nine years and Harriot Maria Tracy, a minor aged six years, all children of Nicolas Tracy, late of said Newburyport, merchant, deceased

 

Mary Tracy, 4 June 1792, Tristram Dalton, administrator of the estate of his mother Mary Tracy, late of Newburyport...

 

Mary Tracy, Newbury, wid, her children, 4 Feb 1797,

 

Mary Tracy, Newburyport, 16 Nov 1819, administrator Nathanial Tracy,

 

Mary Tracy, Newburyport widow intestate died 31 of October last, 16 Nov 1819, Nathanial Tracy of Boston, gentleman, is a son (the other son being out of the commonwealth) and requested by the daughter of the deceased,

 

Mary Tracy, Newburyport widow, 16 Nov 1819, list of lands and goods

 

Mary Tracy, Newburyport widow, 7 December 1819, Nathanial Tracy

 

Mary Tracy, Newburyport widow, 7 December 1819, 15th February 1820, sale of lands in Effingham & lands of dead children (Mrs Hannah Lee, Louisa L Tracy, Helen Tracy, Jeremiah L Tracy, Nathanial Tracy) $15,773.59, death expenses

 

Miriam Tracy, Newburyport widow deceased intestate, 6 Dec 1810, Nicholas Tracy, merchant of Newburyport, ten thousand dollars, land & goods, 

 

Miriam Tracy, Newburyport, deceased, 7th march 1811, Nicholas Tracy, death expenses

 

Nathaniel Tracy, 5th Dec 1796, Newbury Esq, Mary Tracy of Newbury widow, inventory, owed to Lane son of Frazier of London $50,000, John Caffin Jones £4,000, debts $89,418.28

 

Nathaniel Tracey, Newburyport marniner intestate, 9th Jan 1805, John Tracy Newburyport father request admistration be granted to William Woart, $4,000

 

Nathaniel Tracy, 3rd may 1836, Nathaniel Tracy of Boston to probate judge, re estate of Nathaniel Tracy died 1796 leaving a widow and six children Nathaniel, Jeremiah lee of Amherst, Louisa of Newburyport singlewoman, Helen of Newbuyrport singlewoman, Hannah (deceased, married William R Lee, one child William R Lee) and Mary (deceased)

 

Nicholas Tracy, (Capt), 13 June 1787, No. 27968, Newburyport merchant, Miriam Tracy widow, £5,000, Land and goods value of £1735.12.1, Notes against...John Tracy Newburyport 1 April 1783 £32.10.0 payable on demand...Nat Tracy & David Coates Newburyport 1 April 1786 £1000.0.0 payable 1 April 1787...Thomas Tracy do (Newburyport) 5 July 1786 £45.0.0 payable on demand...Money £1852.19.5 3/4...Total £5909.1.11 1/2...1787 Sept 12 to paid Robert Tracy's legacy receipt of 19th £1.0.0

 

Nicholas Tracy, mi, 27 Aug 1787, Miriam Tracy guardian of Nicolas Tracy a minor aged more than fourteen years, son of Nicolas Tracy late of Newburyport

 

Nicolas Tracy, Newburyport merchant, 5 sept 1811, Lydia Tracy widow of Newburyport, $30,000,

 

Patrick Tracy, Newburyport, 6 April 1789,

 

[Jno] Thomas Tracey, Salem, 19 Sept 1763, £1,000, Margt Masury? of Salem administrator

 

Thomas Tracy, Marblehead mariner intestate, 3 Mch 1807, Benjamin Eaton housewright of Salem, $600, administrator

 

Mary Elizabeth Tracy, mi, 19th April 1810, a minor and daughter of Thomas Tracy, late of Marblehead, mariner deceased intestate, Benj Eaton want to resign as guardian. Thomas & Elizabeth Tracy, Thomas died 24 March 1806 and her mother the December following, child is four years and four months of age, one six part of a property in Marblehead owned by the child, mother's sister Martha Eaton singlewoman of Salem

http://www.americanancestors.org/Blogs.aspx?id=29665&blogid=124069

 

Vital Records (1841-1910) Contents

Birth

Katie Tracey, Newburyport, 1873, Birth, 250, 283

Patrick Tracy, Newburyport, 1870, Birth, 223, 273

Robert Emmett Tracy, Newburyport, 1872, Birth, 241, 302

Marriage

Delia Tracey Newburyport, 1878, Marriage, 298, 251

Emeline Tracy, Newburyport, 1884, Marriage, 352, 318

Mary Ann Tracy, Newburyport, 1860, Marriage, 135, 227

Mary Jane Tracy, Newburyport, 1884, Marriage, 352, 320

Mary Tracy, Newburyport, 1876, Marriage, 280, 251

Michael Tracy, Newburyport, 1868, Marriage, 208, 251

Patrick Tracy, Newburyport, 1869, Marriage, 217, 251

Sabina Tracy, Newburyport, 1886, Marriage, 370, 326

Winifred Tracy, Newburyport, 1875, Marriage, 271, 254

Death

Ann Tracy, Newburyport, 1856, Death, 102, 156

Elizabeth Wyer Tracy, Newburyport, 1843-44, Death, 8, 93

Louisa Lee Tracy, Newburyport, 1869, Death, 220, 230

Margaret Tracy, Newburyport, 1843-44, Death, 8, 93

Nathaniel Tracy, Newburyport, 1843-44, Death, 8, 94

Robert E. Tracy, Newburyport, 1872, Death, 247, 287

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, 1872, Death, 247, 289

http://www.sec.state.ma.us/arc/arcsrch/VitalRecordsSearchContents.html

 

Vital Records of Essex County, MA http://ma-vitalrecords.org/

 

Coast: Newburyport - Newbury - Ipswich - Rockport - Gloucester - Manchester - Beverly - Danvers - Salem - Marblehead - Lyn – Saugus - Boston

Inland: Newburyport - Haverhill – Lawrence

Inland: Boston – Dedham - Milford - Great Barrington

 

Beverly - Marriages

Joseph Tracy, widr., a. 51 y. 7 m., clergyman, of Boston, b. Hartford, VT, s. Joseph Tracy and Ruth, of Hartford, and Sarah C. Prince, a. 41 y. 10 m. 11 d., d. Joseph Prince and Joanna, June 3, 1845.*

 

Gloucester - Births

Jams Tracy, s. twin, Andrew Tracy, bp. at Hartford, VT, Nov. 10, 1785. CR5

John Tracy, s. twin, Andrew Tracy, bp. at Hartford, VT, Nov. 10, 1785. CR5

 

Lawrence - Marriages

William Tracy, a. 28 y., carpenter, s. Stephen Tracy and Betsey, and Harriet T. Kelley of Boston, 2d m., a. 31 y., d. Abner Kelley and Persis Thayer, Feb. 11, 1849.*

 

Lynn - Marriages

Cyrus M. Tracey, a. 24 y., machinist, b. Norwich, CT., s. Cyrus Tracey and Hannah, and Caroline M. Needham, a. 24 y., d. George W. Needham and Caroline N., Mar. 20, 1848.*

Lynn - Births

Fredrick Augustus Eugene Tracey, s. Rev. Fredrick P. Tracey, July 18, 1838.

Frederick Plummer Tracy, s. Cyrus Tracy and Hannah, at Windham, CT, Feb. 22, 1815. CR4

Lynn - Deaths

Fredrick Augustus Eugene Tracey, s. Rev. Fredrick P. Tracey, Feb. 23, 1839. [a. 7 m. PR1]

Mark Tracey [carried to Charlestown. PR1], Sept. 21, 1836.

Mary Tracy, b. in Ireland consumption, Apr. 29, 1849, a. 75 y.

 

Marblehead - Marriages

Hannah Tracey, of Newburyport, and Samuel Lee, int. Apr. 28, 1801.

Nathaniel Tracey, of Newburyport, and Mary Lee, Feb. 28, 1775.*

Thomas Tracy, and Eliza Eaton [Nov. 4, 1804. CR1]*

Marblehead - Births

Mary Elizabeth Tracy, d. Thomas Tracy and Elizabeth, bp. Jan. 31, 1808. CR3

Nathaniel Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracyand Mary, bp. Aug. 26, 1789. CR1

Marblehead - Deaths

Elizabeth Tracey, wid. Thomas, Dec. 17, 1806.

Thomas Tracy, "Rec'd the Account of his Death, being Drowned at Sea," Apr. 11, 1806.

 

Newbury - Marriages

Patrick Tracy, Capt., and Mrs. Hannah Carter, Jan. 25, 1742-3.*

Partrick Tracy, Capt., and Hannah Gookin, July 25, 1749.*

Newbury - Births

Hannah Tracey, d. Capt. Patrick Tracey and Hannah, Apr. 23, 1755.

Hannah Tracy, d. Capt. Patrick Tracyand Hannah, Oct. 20, 1743.

Jeremiah Lee Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy, Esq., bp. Dec. 29, 1782. CR1

John Tracy, s. [Capt. CR3] Patrick Tracy and Hannah, Apr. 19, 1753. CC

Nathaniel Tracy, s. [Capt. CR3] Patrick Tracy and Hannah, Aug. 11, 1751.

Nathaniel Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy, Esq. bp. July 15, 1781. CR1

Robert Tracy, s. [Capt. CR8] Nicolas Tracy and Miriam, Aug. 28, 1752.

Vincant Tracy, s. [Capt. CR3] Patrick Tracy and Hannah, May 4, 1745.

Newbury - Deaths

––––– Tracy, ch. Nathaniel Tracy, bur. ––– ––, 1788. PR1

Hannah Tracy, w. Patrick Tracy, Mar. 27, 1746, a. 28 y. GR5

Hannah Tracy, w. Patrick Tracy, Aug. 20, 1756, a. 33 y. GR5

Nathaniel Tracy [Hon. PR1], s. Patrick Tracy and Hannah, Sept. ––, 1796, a. 45 y. [bur. Sept. 21. PR1]

 

Newburyport - Marriages

Patrick Tracey, and Mary Dalton, Mar. 24, 1773. CR2

Catharine Deblois Tracy, and George Titcomb, May 21, 1819.*

Eleanor St. Barbe Tracy, and Joseph Eustis, jr. of Boston, Oct. 2, 1820.*

Elizabeth F[aris. int.] Tracy, and Henry Loring of Boston, Feb. 24, 1818.*

Elizabeth Tracy, and Charles Muzzy of Portland Oct. 22, 1818.*

Hannah Tracy, and Samuel Lee of Marblehead, May 21, 1801.*

Henrietta Tracy, and William Peirce Johnson, Jan. 18, 1807.*

John Tracy, and Margaret Laughton, May 2, 1775. CR2

Lydia St. Barbe Tracy. Mrs., and John Muzzy, Esq. of Portland int. Sept. 9, 1821.

Mary Tracy, and Christopher Basset, Oct. 19, 1817.*

Nathaniel Tracy, of Boston, and Mary Wyer, June 16, 1818.*

Nicolas Tracy, and Lydia St. Barbe, Mar. 19, 1795.*

Thomas Tracy, Rev., of Biddeford, and Ann Bromfield, int. May 5, 1824.

Newburyport - Births

Elizabeth Tracey, d. Nicholas Tracey and Miriam, Jan. 13, 1771.

James Tracey, s. Thomas Tracey and Ann, bp. July 10, 1774. CR2

Catharine Deblois Tracy, d. John Tracy and Margaret, Nov. 12, 1794.

Eleanor St. Barbe Tracy, d. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, June 13, 1799.

Elizabeth Harris Tracy, d. John Tracy and Margaret, Dec. 14, 1791.

Elizabeth Tracy, d. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, Feb. 9, 1796.

Hannah Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Jan. 25, 1776.

Harriot Maria Tracy, d. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, July 5, 1805.

Helen Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Jan. 22, 1796.

Henrietta Tracy, d. John Tracy and Margaret, June 28, 1782.

Henrietta Louisa Tracy, d. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, Sept. 5, 1802.

Henry Laughton Tracy, s. John Tracy and Margaret, Sept. 1, 1777.

Jeremiah Lee Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Dec. 21, 1782.

John Tracy, s. John Tracy and Margaret, Mar. 4, 1776.

John Tracy, s. John Tracy and Margaret, Jan. 2, 1786.

Louisa [Lucia. dup.] Lee Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, at Cambridge, Apr. 25, 1787.

Margaret Tracy, d. twin, John Tracy and Margaret, Mar. 22, 1781.

Martha Lee Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, July 6, 1777.

Martha Abby Lee Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Sept. 27, 1791.

Mary Tracy, d. twin, John Tracy and Margaret, Mar. 22, 1781.

Mary Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, at Cambridge, Feb. 25, 1786.

Nathaniel Tracy, s. John Tracy and Margaret, June 19, 1779.

Nathaniel Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, June 27, 1781.

Nathaniel Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Nov. 25, 1788.

Nathaniel Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Mar. 18, 1790.

Nicholas Tracy, s. Nicholas Tracy and Miriam, July 24, 1773.

Nicolas Tracy, s. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, June 17, 1798.

Patrick Tracy, s. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Feb. 17, 1780.

Newburyport - Deaths

Elisabeth Tracey, d. Nicolas Tracey and Miriam, bur. Oct. 23, 1772. CR2

––––– Tracy, ch. Nathaniel Tracy, Nov. ––, 1778. CR1

––––– Tracy, inf. s. John Tracy and Margaret, bur. July 5, 1797. CR2

Apropo Tracy, May 6, 1810.

Dinah Tracy, wid. Appropo Tracy, Oct. 25, 1828.

Elizabeth Wyer Tracy [d. Nathaniel Tracy. GR4], consumption, May 27, 1843, a. 21 y.

Henry Laughton Tracy, s. John Tracy [and Margaret. CR2], May 26, 1797.

Jeremiah Lee Tracy, Jan. 16, 1844, a. 62 y.

John Tracy, s. John Tracy [and Margaret. CR2], Nov. 27, 1781.

John Tracy, Esq., bur. May 2, 1815. a. 61 y. CR2

Margaret Tracy, w. John Tracy, Esq., Nov. 9, 1806. [a. 52 y. CR2]

Margaret Tracy, Miss, June 25, 1843, a. 62 y.

Martha Lee Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy and Mary, Nov. 10, 1778.

Mary Tracy, wid. Capt. Patrick Tracy, and formerly wid. Capt. Michael Dalton, bur. Dec. 15, 1791. CR2 [a. 79 y. CR1]

Mary Tracy, d. Nathaniel Tracy, Esq. and Mary, Dec. 23, 1809. [a. 23 y. 10 m. CR2]

Mary Tracy, wid. Nathaniel Tracy, Esq., Oct. 31, 1819, a. 64 y.

Miriam Tracy, wid. Capt. Nicolas Tracy, Oct. 28, 1810. [a. 78 y. GR1]

Nathaniel Tracy, s. John Tracy, at sea, ––– ––, 1801.

Nathaniel Tracy, jr., Dec. 7, 1843, a. 23 y. GR4

Nicolas Tracy, Capt., May 23, 1787, a. 61 y. GR1

Nicolas Tracy, s. Nicolas Tracy and Lydia, Apr. 12, 1798. [a. 10 m. GR1]

Nicolas Tracy, s. Capt. Nicolas Tracy, July 27, 1811. [a. 38 y. CR2]

Patrick Tracy, Esq., Feb. ––, 1789, a. 78 y. CR1

Robert Tracy, Dec. 16, 1804. [a. 53 y. CR1]

 

Rockport - Marriages

Cornelius Tracy, a. 25 y., laborer, b. Ireland s. Edmund Tracy and Bridget, and Eliza Ward, a. 25 y., b. Ireland d. Michael Ward and Bridget, at Salem, Aug. 25, 1848.

John Tracy, a. 23 y., quarryman, b. Ireland s. John Tracy and Johannah, and Johrnr [Johana. made over in pencil] Miaxsy, a. 19 y., b. Ireland d. John Miaxsy, at Salem, Aug. 25, 1849.

 

Salem - Marriages

Caroline M. Tracey and Charles, M. Richardson, Apr. 15, 1835.*

Cornelius Tracy and Elizabeth Word, both of Rockport, both b. Ireland, Aug. 26, 1848.

Eunice Tracy and William Cooper, Sept. ––, 1777.*

John Tracy and Johana Maixsi, both of Rockport, both b. Ireland, Aug. 25, 1849.

Salem - Births

Susanna Tracy (w. Benajah Collins), Mar. 25, 1745. PR280

Thomas Tracy, s. Thomas and Margaret, May 8, 1824. CR14

Salem - Deaths

Patrick Tracey of Lynn, lung fever, at Lynn, Nov. 7, 1842, a. 60 y.

 

Saugus - Marriages

Thomas Tracy, and Margaret Dougherty, "both residents of Saugus," int. Aug. 17, 1823.

 

Dedham

October 10, 1879 The Armagh Guardian

Died August 27, at Dedham, Mass. [Massachusetts?], Patrick Tracy, a native of the parish of Devenish, Co. Fermanagh aged 78 years.

 

Milford

Margaret Tracy, d. of Thomas and Margaret, , 1826.

Martin Tracy, s. of Thomas and Margaret, Nov. 6, 1849.

 

Catharine Barrett, d. of James and Nancy Tracy, in Ireland, May — , 1827.

 

Great Barrington

Dinah Tracy and Medad Curtiss, Dec. 23, 1779.* c.R.2.

 

* intention also recorded

 

 

Tudor family. Tudor family papers, ca.1740-1869: Guide.

Houghton Library, Harvard College Library

William Tudor (1750-1819) was a lawyer of Boston, Mass., served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives and in the State Senate, and was secretary of state for the Commonwealth. He acted as attorney for many Tory sympathizers during the Revolutionary War.

 

(118) Rose, Alexander. MS.D.(certified copy); [n.p.] 15 Dec 1779. 1s.(2p.) Certified by Henry Alline.

Deed of sale of some land by Alexander and Margaret Rose to Jonathan Jackson, Leonard Jarvis, John Lowell, Thomas Russell, Stephen Higginson, Martin Brimmer, and John Cabot, Andrew Cabot, Nathaniel Tracy and John Tracy. With an MS. copy of the deed.

(139) Temple, William. MS. and printed D.s.; [Braintree?] 15 Jul 1783. 1s.(2p.)

Deed of sale of some land on the Kennebeck River to Nathaniel Tracy. Signed also by Amy (Fitch) Temple and Richard Cranch, Justice of the peace. Witnessed by William Tudor and Elizabeth Miller.

(140) [Tracy, Nathaniel, 1751-1796] MS.L.(copy?) to John Nelson; Boston, 25 Oct 1783. 1s.(3p.)

Includes extract from the will of Robert Temple and small autograph note by Tracy.

(141) [Tracy, Nathaniel, 1751-1796]. A.L.s. to [William Tudor?]; [n.p., n.d.] 1s.(3p.)

Includes copy of part of William Temple's deed of sale to Tracy of land on the Kennebeck River.

 

 

 

 

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors Revolutionary War.

A Compilation from the Archives In accordance with Chapter 100, Resolves of 1891.

Wright & Potter Printing Co., State Printers, Boston, 1907.

 

Tracey, Tracy. [This name also appears under the form of Tracey, Trasey, Trassey, Trasy.]

 

Andrew Hodges Trasey. Private, Capt. Timothy Stow's co. Col. Ephraim "Wheelock's regt.; pay abstract for wages, mileage, etc.; company stationed at Ticonderoga in 1776.

 

Andrew Hodges Tracey. List of men mustered by Nathaniel Barber, Muster Master for Suffolk Co., dated Boston, Jan. 8, 1777; Maj. Stevens's (Artillery) battalion; reported received State bounty; also, 2d Lieutenant, Col. John Crane's (Artillery) regt.; Continental Army pay accounts for service from June 1, 1777, to Sept. 9, 1778; reported resigned Sept. 9, 1778; also, order on the Board of War, for clothing, dated West Point, June 20, 1778, signed by said Tracey and others, to be delivered to Capt. Noah Nichols; certificate dated West Point, June 20, 1778, signed by Ebenezer Stevens, Lieutenant Colonel Commandant of Artillery, Northern department, certifies that said men belonged to his corps of artillery; also, receipt for clothing, given to the Board of War, dated West Point, June 20, 1778, signed by said Tracey and others.

 

Andrew Hodges Tracey, New York. 2d It., Steven's Ind. Bat., attached to 3d Contl. Art. (Crane). [Valley Forge 1777-1778]

 

Asa Tracey, Gouldsborough. Private, Capt. Samuel Libbey's co., in a detachment from Col. Benjamin Foster's (Lincoln Co.) regt.; enlisted Sept. 2, 1777; discharged Oct. 13, 1777; service, 1 mo. 11 days, at Machias when British ships lay in that harbor.

 

Asa Tracey. Certificate dated Machias, Dec. 12, 1777, signed by Capt. Reuben Dyer, certifying that Capt. Stephen Smith, Muster Master for Lincoln Co., had paid said Tracey and others belonging to Capt. Dyer's co. the botmty allowed them for engaging to serve on the expedition against St. Johns.

 

Asa Tracy. Private, Capt. Daniel Sullivan's co. of volimteers; service from July 28, 1779, to Sept. 28, 1779, 2 mos., on expedition to Majorbagaduce.

 

Asa Tracy. Private, Capt. Reuben Dyer's co.; enlisted Oct. 9, 1777; discharged Dec. 6, 1777; service, 2 mos.; company raised for expedition against St. Johns, N. S., and continued in service at Machias for its defence.

 

Asaph (also given Asa) Tracy, Pembroke. Matross, Capt. Daniel Lothrop's co. Col. Thomas Crafts 's (Artillery) regt.; abstract for advance pay, mileage, etc., dated Boston, June 8, 1776; also, same co. and regt.; enlisted May 30, 1776, 4 days preceding march; service to Aug. 1, 1776, 67[?] days; also, Gunner, Capt. Lothroii's (7th) co., Col. Crafts's regt.; service from Aug. 1, 1776, to Nov. 1, 177G, 3 mos.; also, same co. and regt.; service from Nov. 1, 1776, to Feb. 1, 1777, 3 mos.; reported as serving 1 mo. in Colony service, 2 mos. in Continental service; also, same co. and regt.; service from Feb. 1, 1777, to date of discharge, May 7, 1777, 3 mos. 7 days.

 

Asaph Tracy, Pembroke. Private, Capt. Freedom Chamberlain's co. Col. Bai- ley's regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 2 weeks.

 

Asaph Tracy. Seaman, brigantine "Hazard," commanded by Capt. Simeon Samson; engaged March 27, 1778; discharged May 20, 1778; service, 1 mo. 23 days. Roll dated Boston.

 

Asaph, Jr. Tracy, Pembroke. Private, Capt. Freedom Chamberlain's co. Gen. John Thomas's regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 3, 1775; service, 3 mos. 6 days; also, company return dated Camp at Roxbury, Oct. 6, 1775; also, order for bounty coat dated Camp at Roxbury, Nov. 9, 1775; also. Private, Capt. Chamberlin's co.; marched March 5, 1776; service, 5 days; company marched on the alarm of March 5, 1776, at the time of taking Dorchester Heights.

 

Benjamin Tracy. Pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Roxbury for service in the Continental Army during 1780; reported mustered, marched, and not returned.

 

Christopher Tracey, Gouldsborough. Private, Capt. Samuel Libbey's co., in a detachment from Col. Benjamin Foster's (Lincoln Co.) regt.; enlisted Sept. 29, 1777; discharged Oct. 13, 1777; service, 14 days, at Machias when British ships lay in that harbor.

 

Christopher Tracey, No. 4. Private, Capt. Henry Dyer's detachment from Col. Benjamin Foster's (Lincoln Co.) regt.; entered service Sept. 29, 1777; discharged Oct. 8, 1777; service, 8 (also given 9) days; company marched to Machias at sundry times when British ships lay in that harbor.

 

Christopher Tracy. Private, Capt. Reuben Dyer's co.; enlisted Oct. 9, 1777; discharged Dec. 13, 1777; service, 2 mos. 7 days; company raised for expedition against St. Johns, N. S., and continued in service at Machias for its defence; also, certificate dated Machias, Dec. 12, 1777, signed by Capt. Reuben Dyer, certifying that Capt. Stephen Smith, Muster Master for Lincoln Co., had paid said Tracy and others belonging to Capt. Dyer's co. the bounty allowed them for engaging to serve on the expedition against St. Johns.

 

David Tracey, New Marlborough. Adjutant, Lieut. Col. Barnabas Sears'.s regt.; marched Aug. 1, 1781; discharged Nov. 15, 1781; service, 3 nios. 20 days, including travel (100 miles) home; regiment raised for 3 months.

 

David Tracey. Private, Capt. Enoch Noble's co.; entered service Aug. 21, 1777; discharged Oct. 21, 1777; service, 60 (also given 61) days; enlistment, 3 months; company marched to Manchester, Vt., thence to Allington, thence to Still- water, by order of Gen. Lincoln, joined Col. John Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt., and marched to Bolton's Rills [?] and there served until regularly discharged; also, pay roll for same service certified at Shetideld.

 

David Tracy. Capt. William Clark's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's regt.; entered service Aug. 14, 1777; service, 8 days; company marched from Gageborough to Bennington Aug. 14, 1777, at request of Gen. Stark on an alarm.

 

David Tracy. Lieutenant, Capt. Jeremiah Hickok's co., Lieut. Col. Sears's regt.; entered service Aug. 6, 1781; discharged Nov. 8, 1781; service, 3 mos. 7 days, including travel (4 days) home; regiment raised in Berkshire Co. to serve for 3 months. Roll endorsed " Col Elisha Porters Reg't."

 

David Tracy. Private, Capt. Noah Allen's (late Capt. Moses Soul's) co. Col. Asa Whitcomb's regt.; muster roll dated Camp at Ticonderoga, Nov. 27, 1776; enlisted Dec. 7, 1775.

 

David Tracy. Private, Capt. Peter Ingersoll's co. Col. John Brown's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service July 1, 1777; discharged July 30, 1777; service, 30 days.

 

David Tracy. Private, in a company commanded by Lieut. Eleazer Taylor, Col. John Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Aug. 17, 1777; discharged Aug. 20, 1777; service, 4 days; company marched to Pittsfield on an alarm at Bennington.

 

David Tracy. Sergeant, Capt. Adam Kasson's co. Col. Israel Chapen's (3d) regt.; engaged Oct. 25, 1779; discharged Nov. 21, 1779; service, 1 mo. 1 day, at Claverack, including 3 days (60 miles) travel home; regiment raised for 3 months.

 

David Tracy. Sergeant, Capt. John Collar's co. Col. John Ashly's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service July 19, 1779; discharged Aug. 27, 1779; service, 1 mo. 9 days; company marched to Connecticut u.nder command of Lieut. Col. Powel.

 

David Tracy. Sergeant, Capt. Samuel Warner's co. Col. John Brown's regt.; entered service July 18, 1780; discharged Oct. 23, 1780; service, 3 mos. 13 days, travel (130 miles) included; company raised in Berkshire Co.; regiment raised for 3 mouths.

 

Edward Trefey, Marblehead. Private, Cajit. Putnam's co. Col. Hutchinson's Mass. Line regt. of 12 months men; list of deserters in 1776.

 

Elam Tracy. Private, Capt. Ambrose Hill's co., Lieut. Col. Miles Powell's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; enlisted July 18, 1779; discharged Aug. 22, 1779; ser- vice, 1 mo. 10 days, at New Haven, Conn., including 5 days (110 miles) travel home; order for payment of amoimt of roll dated at Richmond and signed by Capt. Hill; also, Capt. Joseph Raymond's co. Col. David Rosseter's regt., Gen. Fellows's brigade; entered service Oct. 14, 1780; discharged Oct. 17, 1780; service, 5 days; company marched to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Stillwater on the alarm of Oct. 14, 1780; also, same co., regt., and brigade; entered service Oct. 18, 1780; discharged Oct. 20, 1780; service, 4 days; company marched to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Stillwater on the alarm of Oct. 18, 1780; also, Capt. John Bacon's co. Col. Rosseter's regt., Gen. John Fellows's brigade; entered service Nov. 5, 1780; discharged Nov. 7, 1780; service, 4 days; company marched to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Still- water on the alarm of Nov. 5, 1780.

 

Elijah Tracey. Private; pay roll of part of Capt. Amos Rathbun's co., in Lieut. Col. David Roseter's detachment of militia, which marched to join Northern army; entered service Aug. 15, 1777; discharged Aug. 21, 1777; service, 7 days. Roll sworn to in Berkshire Co.

 

Elijah Tracy. Private, Lieut. Jabez Colt's co. Col. Rosseter's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; entered service July 17, 1777; discharged July 27, 1777; service, 11 days, at the Northward; roll dated Richmond; also, Capt. Joseph Raymond's co. Col. David Rosseter's regt. Gen. Fellows's brigade; entered service Oct. 14, 1780; discharged Oct. 17, 1780; service, 5 days; company marched to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Stillwater on the alarm of Oct. 14, 1780.

 

Enos Tracy. Private, Capt. Aaron Rowley's co. Col. David Rosseter's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; entered service Aug. 13, 1777; discharged Aug. 20, 1777; service, 7 days, at Bennington; also, Capt. Ambrose Hill's co., Lieut. Col. Miles Powell's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; enlisted July 18, 1779; discharged Aug. 22, 1779; service, 1 mo. 10 days, at New Haven, Conn., including 5 days (110 miles) travel home; order for payment of amount of roll dated at Richmond and signed by Capt. Hill.

 

Henry Tracey. Petition signed by Paul Hussey, of Nantucket, asking that measures be taken for the exchange of said Tracey and other prisoners confined on board prison-ships at New York; ordered in Council Aug. 12, 1777, that the petition be granted and that a cartel be sent to New York.

 

Jacob Tracy, Pembroke (probably). Fifer, Capt. Freedom Chamberlain's co., Col. Bailey's regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 1 week.

 

James Tracey. List of prisoners brought to Marblehead in the cartel "Pacific" to be exchanged for British prisoners, as returned by Thomas Stone, Commissary [year not given]; said Tracey, Commander, reported as having been taken in the "Yankee Hero" (privateer) by the British ship "Milford”; also, return of British prisoners received on board the cartel "Pacific" at Marblehead, by Thomas Stone, Commissary [year not given]; three officers of the armed schooner "Diligent" appear in endorsement upon said return, as having been accepted in lieu of said Tracey, Captain, and two other officers of the "Yankee Hero" (privateer); Lieut. John Knight accepted in lieu of said Tracey.

 

James Tracy. Communication dated South Hadley, Nov. 9, 1776, signed by Joseph Moody, Chairman of Committee of Correspondence of South Hadley, stating that representation had been made to them by said Tracy, Captain, that there was an opportunity for his being exchanged for Lieut. John Knights, an officer on parole assigned to residence at South Hadley, but held in confinement in the jail at Northampton, and expressing their willingness to agree to the exchange, notwithstanding the ill treatment they had received at the hands of said Knights, and the fact that he was suspected of having stolen a box containing documents relating to surveys, and that he had not paid for his subsistence; ordered in Council Nov. 23, 1776, that John Knights be permitted to be sent in the "Flagg of Truce" at Marblehead to be exchanged for said Tracy, provided he make suitable concessions to the Committee of Correspondence of South Hadley for his ill treatment of them and also discharge his indebtedness; also, petition dated Boston, Aug. 1, 1777, signed by Robert Tracy, in behalf of said James Tracy, Commander of the privateer "Hero" lying in Boston harbor and ready for sea, stating that the Naval Officer of the port had refused to give him a pass unless he could produce a certificate from the treasurer based upon the bonds required to be given by the owners of privateers; that the vessel had been fitted out at Newburyport and had passed the fort there and at Marblehead and had only entered Boston for a harbor, and as his owners had probably furnished the necessary bonds, if required to do so at the place of fitting out, asking that the Naval Officer be directed to give him such a pass as shall enable him to put to sea; ordered in Council that the Naval Officer permit the vessel mentioned to pass the forts and proceed to sea.

 

Jeremiah Tracy. Private, Capt. Daniel Sullivan's co. of volunteers; service from July 28, 1779, to Sept. 28, 1779, 2 mos., on expedition to Majorbagaduce.

 

Jeremiah Tracy. Sergeant, Capt. John Hall's co., Col. Benjamin Foster's (Lincoln Co.) regt.; service from Aug. 7, 1779, to Sept. 7, 1779, 1 mo.; company marched on expedition to Majorbagaduce Aug. 7, 1779, by order of Gen. Lovel; roll endorsed " Service at Penobscot; " also, Lieut. Joliu Scott's detachment from 6th Lincoln Co. regt.; service between Aug. 31, 1779, and Nov. 20, 1779, 1 mo., at Machias; roll endorsed " Service at Penobscot."

 

John Tracy. Col. Joab Stafford's (Independent) co. of volunteers; .service, 6 days; company raised from the alarm lists of New Providence, Lanesborough, East Hoosuck, and Gageborough, marched Aug. 14, 1777, and fought in battle near Bennington Aug. 16, 1777; also, Capt. Thomas Bussey's co. of Berkshire Co. militia, known as the " Silver Grays; " entered service Sept. 5, 1777; service, 28 days; company marched to Pawlet on an alarm; also, Private, Capt. Asa Barns's (1st) co. Col. Israel Chapen's (3d) regt.; enlisted Oct. 18, 1779; discharged Nov. 21, 1779; service, 1 mo. 8 days, at Claverack, including 3 daj's (60 miles) travel home; regiment raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months.

 

John Tracey, Salem, Essex Co., probably. Lt., 12th Mass. Inf. (S. Brewer). [Valley Forge 1777-1778]

 

John Tracy. Pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Salem for service in the Continental Army during 1780; marched Aug. 6, 1780; discharged Dec. 17, 1780; service, 4 mos. 24 days, including travel (240 miles) home.

 

Jonathan (also given Jonathan, Jr.) Tracy, Gouldsborough. Corporal, Capt. Francis Shaw, Jr.'s co.; enlisted Sept. 7, 1775; service, 4 mos. 3 days; company stationed at Gouldsborough, No. 4, Narraguagus, and Pleasant River, for defence of seacoast; also, 1st Lieutenant, Capt. Samuel Libbey's (4th) co., 6th Lincoln Co. regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; commissioned Feb. 1, 1779; also, Lieutenant, Capt. Daniel Sullivan's co. of volunteers; service from July 28, 1779, to Sept. 28, 1779, 2 mos., on expedition to Majorbagaduce.

 

Jonathan, Jr. Tracey, Gouldsborough. 1st Sergeant, Capt. Samuel Libbey's co., in a detachment from Col. Benjamin Foster's (Lincoln Co.) regt.; engaged Sept. 7, 1777; discharged Oct. 6, 1777; service | mo. 14 days, at Machias, when British ships lay in that harbor.

 

Joseph Tracey, Marblehead, Essex Co. Regt. qm., Col. Lee's Mass. Additional Contl. Inf. [Valley Forge 1777-1778]

 

Jury? Trasy Private, Capt. Eleazer Crabtree's co.; enlisted Aug. 26, 1775; service to Dec. 31, 1775, 4 mos. 15 days; company stationed at Frenchman's Bay, Lincoln Co., for defence of seacoast.

 

Michael Treffy. Capt. Thomas Grant's co. Col. Glover's regt.; order for money in lieu of bounty coat dated Camp at Cambridge, Dec. 25, 1775.

 

Nathaniel Tracey. 1st Lieutenant, Capt. "William Fletcher's (7th) co. Col. Simonds's (2d Berkshire Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; commissioned April 25, 1778.

 

Nathaniel Tracy, Gageborough or Partridgefield. Capt. Nathan Watkins's co. Col. Paterson's regt.; receipt for boimty coat dated Nov. 13, 1775.

 

Nathaniel Tracy. Lieutenant, Capt. "William "Watkins's 10th (Partridgefield) CO., Col. Benjamin Simonds's (2d Berkshire Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers chosen by the several companies in said regiment, as returned by Col. Simonds; ordered in Council May 4, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; reported commissioned May 3 [?], 1776; commissions reported dated June 1 1776; also. Lieutenant, Capt. William Clark's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's regt.; entered service July 17, 1777; service, 13 days; company marched from Gageborough to Manchester at request of Gen. Schuyler on an alarm; also, Lieutenant, Capt. William Fletcher's co., Col. Simonds's regt.; engaged Oct. 13, 1780; service, 6 days; company marched to Pawlet Oct. 13, 1780; also, 1st Lieutenant, Capt. Fletcher's (7th) co., 2d Berkshire Co. regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers [year not given].

 

Nehemiah Tracy. List of men who marched from Pittsfield to Ticouderoga April 25, 1777, under command of Lieut. Stephen Crofoot, and were dismissed May 22, 1777; service, 4 weeks.

 

Patrick Tracy, Newburyport. Private, Capt. Timothy Barnard's co. Col. Moses Little's (17th) regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1773; enlisted May 9, 1775; service, 12 weeks; also, company return endorsed " Oct 9 1775; " age, 25 yrs.; the word " Canada " appears after name.

 

Patrick Tracy. Private, Capt. Benjamin Perkins's co.; company return for the year 1775.

 

Prince Tracey. Private, Capt. Jeremiah Miller's co. Col. Joseph "Vose's (1st) / regt.; muster rolls for Jan. and Feb., 1782, dated York Huts; enlisted April 9, 1781; enlistment, 3 years.

 

Prince Tracey. Private, Capt. Samuel Merriman's co., Col. Phineas "Wright's y- (6th Hampshire Co.) regt.; enlisted Oct. 3, 1777; discharged Oct. 18, 1777; service, 22 days, in Northern department, including 7 days (140 miles) travel home. Roll attested at Northfield.

 

Prince Trasy. Return of men raised in Essex Co. for Continental service, agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780; engaged for town of Newburyport; engaged April 9, 1781; term, 3 years.

 

Prince Tracy. Private, Capt. Jeremiah Miller's co. Col. Joseph Vose's (1st) regt.; muster rolls for April and May, 1781, dated West Point; enlisted April 9, 1781; enlistment, 3 years; reported at the Lines in May, 1781; also, muster / rolls for June and July, 1781, dated Phillipsburgh; reported on command with Col. Scammel; also, muster rolls for Aug.-Nov., 1781; also, return of recruits sent by the state of Massachusetts as portion of her quota of the Continental Army subsequent to Jan. 1, 1781, who were reported as unfit for duty; 1st Mass. regt.; age, 20 yrs. 6 mos.; stature, 5 ft. 4 in.; engaged for town of Newburyport; term, 3 years; reported afflicted with blindness and dropsy.

 

Robert Tracey. List of prisoners brought to Marblehead in the cartel "Pacific" to be exchanged for British prisoners, as returned by Thomas Stone, Commissary [year not given]; said Tracey, Lieutenant of Marines, reported as having been taken in the "Yankee Hero" (privateer) by the British ship "Milford" also, return of British prisoners received on board the cartel "Pacific," at Marblehead, by Thomas Stone, Commissary [year not given]; Thomas Murray, Lieutenant, Royal Fencibles, belonging to the armed schooner "Dispatch," accepted in lieu of said Tracey, Lieutenant, late of the "Yankee Hero."

 

Robert Tracy. Treasury pay roll of the brigantine "Pallas," an armed vessel commanded by Capt. James Johnson, for service from July 3, 1779, to Aug. 20, 1779, on Penobscot expedition.

 

Robert Tracy. Treasury pay roll of Maj. Thomas Thomas's (Artillery) co. for service on expedition to Rhode Island in 1778.

 

Roswell Tracey. List of prisoners delivered Col. Gabriel Johonnot by Charles Waller, Commissary of Prisoners at Rhode Island, March 17, 1778; reported a Seaman.

 

Samuel Tracy. Capt. William Clark's co., Col. Benjamin Simonds's regt.; entered service Sept. 5, 1777; service, 27 days; company marched from Gageborough Sept. 5, 1777, to reinforce army under Gen. Lincoln at Pawlet; also. Private, same co. and regt.; entered service Oct. 13, 1780; discharged Oct. 18, 1780; service, 6 days, on an alarm at the Northward; company marched from "Windsor to Shaftsbury Oct. 13, 1780, by order of Gen. Fellows; also, Capt. Joseph Peirce's co., Col. Asa Barns's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Oct. 28, 1781; service, 10 days; company marched by order of Gen. Fellows on an alarm at the Northward.

 

Seth Tracey? Private, Capt. Amos Rathbxin's co., Maj. Caleb Hyde's detachment of militia; entered service July 8, 1777; discharged July 20, 1777; service, 13 days; company marched to reinforce Northern army and was dismissed 97 miles from home; roll sworn to in Berkshire Co.; also, Capt. Rathbun's CO., Col. John Brown's detachment of militia; entered service Sept. 21, 1777; discharged Oct. 14, 1777; service, 24 days; company marched at request of Gen. Gates.

 

Seth Tracy. Private, Capt. Amos Rathbun's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; muster roll dated Ticonderoga, Feb. 25, 1777; enlisted Dec. 16, 1776; enlistment to expire March 15, 1777; also, receipt given to Capt. Amos Rathbun, dated Richmond, signed by said Tracy and others, for wages for service from July 8 to July 20, 1777; also. Private, Capt. Aaron Rowley's co. Col. John Ashley's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; entered service July 22, 1777; discharged Aug. 13, 1777; service, 23 days, at Stillwater; also, Capt. Joseph Raymond's co. Col. David Rosseter's regt., Gen. Fellows's brigade; entered service Oct. 14, 1780; discharged Oct. 17, 1780; service, 5 days; company marched to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Stillwater on the alarm of Oct. 14, 1780; also, Corporal, Capt. John Bacon's co., Col. Rosseter's regt. Gen. John Fellows's brigade; entered service Oct. 13, 1781; discharged Oct. 20, 1781; service, 11 days, travel included, with militia sent as reinforcements to army under Gen. Stark at Stillwater on an alarm; roll endorsed " Col Hides Reg't; " also, Capt. Bacon's co. Col. Caleb Hyde's regt., Gen. Rosseter's brigade; entered service Oct. 20, 1781; discharged Oct. 28, 1781; service, 9 days, at Stillwater on an alarm.

 

Silas Tracey, Nf w Marlborough. Private, Capt. Moses Soul's co., Col. John Fellows's (8th) regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 8, 1775; service, 3 mos. 1 day; also, company return dated Oct. 7, 1775; reported enlisted April 21, 1775.

 

Silas Tracy, Sandislield (probably). Private, Lieut. Moses Soul's co. of Minutemen, Col. John Fellows's regt., which marched April 21, 1775, in response to the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 17 days; company served to May 7, 1775; also, Capt. Soul's co., Col. Fellows's regt.; order for bounty coat dated Camp at Dorchester, Nov. 1, 1775.

 

Silas Tracy. Lieutenant, Capt. Adam Kasson's co. Col. John Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Oct. 14, 1780; discharged Oct. 16, 1780; service, 6 days, on an alarm at the Northward by order of Gen. Fellows, including travel (3 days) home.

 

Silas Tracy. Private, Capt. Ephraim Brookins's co., Lieut. Col. John Collar's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Oct. 13, 1781; discharged Oct. 20, 1781; service, 12 days, including 4 days (84 miles) travel home; company marched by order of Col. John Ashley, Jr., on an alarm at the Northward.

 

Silas Tracy. Sergeant, Capt. Noah Lankton's co. Col. Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service April 26, 1777; discharged May 20, 1777; service, 25 days, at Saratoga at request of Gen. Gates.

 

Silas Trassey. Lieutenant, Capt. John King's co. Col. John Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Jane 27, 1780; discharged July 4 (also given July 1) , 1780; service, 8 days; company marched by order of Brig. Gen. Fellows on the alarm of June 27, 1780, to sustain fort at West Point.

 

Solomon Tracy, Gageborough ("Windsor). Private, Capt Nathan "Watkins's co., Col. John Paterson's regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 10, 1775; service, 2 mos. 27 days; also, company return [probably Oct., 1775]; also, order for bounty coat dated Charlestown, Fort No. 3, Oct. 26, 1775.

 

Solomon Tracy, No. 4. Private, Capt. Francis Shaw, Jr.'s co.; enlisted Sept. 11, 1775; service, 3 mos., 3 weeks, 6 days; company stationed at Gouldsborough, No. 4, Narraguagus, and Pleasant River, for defence of seacoast.

 

Solomon Tracy. 1st Lieutenant, Capt. Benaiah House's (16th) co., 1st Berkshire Co. regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; commissioned June 5, 1779.

 

Solomon Tracy. Capt. Samuel Low's co., Col. Benjamin Simonds's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service June .30, 1777; discharged Aug. 4, 1777; service, 36 days, at "St. Coyx" (St. Croix) .

 

Solomon Tracy. Capt. William Clark's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's regt.; entered service Sept. 5, 1777; service, 27 days; company marched from Gageborough Sept. 5, 1777, to reinforce army under Gen. Lincoln at Pawlet.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. Daniel Brown's co. commanded by Lieut. William White, Col. Miles Powell's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; enlisted July 23, 1779; discharged Sept. 1, 1779; service, 1 mo. 10 days, at New Haven, Conn., including 6 days (120 miles) travel home. Roll sworn to at Lanesborough.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. George King's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; muster roll dated Ticonderoga, Feb. 25, 1777; enlistment to expire March 15, 1777; also, (late) Capt. King's co. Col. Simonds's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; entered service Dec. 16, 1776; service to March 24, 1777, 98 days, at Ticonderoga.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. George King's co. Col. Hopkins's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service July 15, 1776; discharged Aug. 4, 1776; service, 20 days; company made up of detachments from four companies and marched to the Highlands, N. Y.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. Peter Ingersoll's co. Col. John Brown's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service July 1, 1777; discharged July 30, 1777; service, 30 days.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. William Clark's co., Col. Benjamin Simonds's regt.; entered service Oct. 13, 1780; discharged Oct. 18, 1780; service, 6 days, on an alarm at the Northward; company marched from Windsor to Shaftsbury Oct. 13, 1780, by order of Gen. Fellows.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, Capt. William Watkins's co. Col. Benjamin Simonds's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; muster roll dated Ticonderoga, Feb. 25, 1777; enlisted Dec. 16, 1776; enlistment to expire March 15, 1777.

 

Solomon Tracy. Private, in a company commanded by Lieut. Eleazer Taylor, Col. John Ashley's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Aug. 17, 1777; discharged Aug. 20, 1777; service, 4 days; company marched to Pittsfieid on an alarm at Bennington.

 

Thomas Tracey. Chief Mate, ship "Duke de Chartres," Alexander Wilson, Master; service from Jan. 27, 1777, to Jan. 27, 1778, 12 mos.; also. Master, ship "General Arnold" (privateer); petition dated Newburyport, April 15, 1778, signed by Samuel Newhall, in behalf of himself and others, of Newburyport, asking that Moses Brown be commissioned as commander of said vessel; ordered in Council April 16, 1778, that a commission be issued.

 

Thomas Tracey. Receipt dated July 22, 1783, for wages for service to May 10, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. John Manley; also, receipt dated Oct. 27, 1783, for wages for service from May 10, 1783, to Oct. 14, 1783, on board the frigate "Hague," commanded by Capt. Manley.

 

Thomas Tracey. Private, Capt. Joseph Sibley's co., Col. Danforth Keyes's regt.; enlisted July 20, 1777; enlistment to expire Jan. 1, 1778; roll dated Providence; also, same co. and regt.; pay roll dated North Kingston, Dec. 3, 1777; also, same co. and regt.; service from Dec. 1, 1777, to Jan. 2, 1778, 1 mo. 2 days, including travel home; roll dated rovidence.

 

Thomas Tracy, East Hoosuck. List of men raised for tlie 6 months service and returned by Brig. Gen. Paterson as having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway, Oct. 25, 1780; also, pay roll for 6 months men raised by the town of Adams for service in the Continental Army during 1780; marched June 22, 1780; discharged Dec. 31, 1780; service, 6 mos. 16 days, including travel (140 miles) home.

 

Thomas Tracy, Pembroke (probably). Private, Capt. Freedom Chamberlain's CO., Col. Bailey's regt., which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 2 weeks.

 

Thomas Tracey, Pembroke. Private, Capt. Thomas Turner's co. of militia, Col. John Bailey's regt.; pay abstract for mileage, dated Jan. 10, 1776; mileage for 63 miles allowed said Tracey; company reported encamped with Brig. Gen. Thomas's brigade.

 

Thomas Tracy, Worcester. List of men mustered by Thomas Newhall, Muster Master for "Worcester Co., to serve ia Col. "Waid's regt. at Rhode Island [year not given]; Capt. Belknap's co.; also, Musician, Capt. Ebenezer Belknap's CO., Col. Nathaniel Wade's regt.; enlisted April 10, 1778; service to July 15, 1778, 3 mos. 5 days, at Rhode Island; roll dated North Kingston; also, same CO. and regt.; enlisted July 15, 1778; discharged Jan. 1, 1779; service, 5 mos. 20 days, at Rhode Island, including travel (60 miles) from North Kingston to place of discharge?, i. e., home; also. Private, same co. and regt.; muster rolls dated North Kingston, Nov. 6, and Dec. 1, 1778; reported on command as shoemaker on roll dated Dec. 1, 1778; also, same co. and regt.; muster rolls sworn to at East Greenwich, Sept. 28, Nov. 10, and Dec. 30, 1778; enlistment to expire Jan. 1, 1779.

 

Thomas Tracy. Private, Capt. Aaron Rowley's co., Maj. David Rosseter's detachment of Berkshire Co. militia; entered service Feb. 23, 1777; discharged April 7, 1777; service, 43 days, at Ticonderoga.

 

Thomas Tracy. Private, Capt. Joseph Sibley's co. Col. Danforth Keyes's regt.; list of men stationed at North Kingston, Dec. 8, 1777, dated Sturbridge.

 

William Tracey. Drummer, Capt. Daniel Grout's co., [Lieut. Col.] Enoch Hallet's regt.; enlisted Aug. 1, 1780; discharged Oct. 30, 1780; service, 3 mos.; regiment raised to reinforce Continental Army for 3 months.

 

William Tracey. Private, Capt. William White's co., (late) Col. John Brown's regt.; enlisted July 11, 1780; discharged Oct. 22, 1780; service, 3 mos. 17 days, at Stone Arabia, N. Y., including 6 days (120 miles) travel home; company raised in Berkshire Co.

 

William Tracy. Capt. Samuel Low's co., Col. Benjamin Simonds's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service June 30, 1777; discharged Aug. 14, 1777; service, 46 days, at "St. Coyx" (St. Croix); also, same co. and regt.; entered service Aug. 14, 1777; discharged Aug. 19, 1777; service, 6 days, at Bennington; also, Private, same co. and regt.; entered service Sept. 5, 1777; discharged Oct. 1, 1777; service, 27 days, at Pawlet.

 

Additional Ref: Dedication exercises at the Massachusetts military monument, Valley Forge, Pa. 1777-8.

 

 

 

 

1784-1840. Index of obituaries in Massachusetts centinel and Columbian centinel

 

Tracey, Ezra d.in Pittasield,aged 74 (C.C.Aug.27,1808)

Tracey, Hezekiah Lt.,at battle os Monmouth in Rev. war d.in Pranklln,aged 82 (C.C.July 30,1817) & (C.C.Aug.13,1817)

Tracey, James d.in New York,aged 28 (C.C.July 28,1819)

Tracey, Mary d.in Neaburyport, dau. of Hathaniel Tracey ,aged 26 (C.C.Dec.30,1809) .

Tracey, Nathaniel d.in Hinadale,aged 81 (C.C.Jan.7,1832)

Tracey, Nicholas d.in Heaburyport,aged 38 (C.C.July 31,1811)

Tracey, Patrick, merchant d.in Newburyport, aged 78 yrs (M.C.Mar.7,1789)

Tracey, ThOmas, MaJ.,of the house of Avery & Tracey d.in Norwich, Conn.,aged 38 (C.C.Jan.3,1807)

Tracey, Uriah Hon.,U.S.Senator of Conn. d.in Washlngton, aged 54 (C.C.July 29,1807)

 

Tracy, Brig-Gen., Officer os the Rev.army d.In New Marlboro (C.C.Àpr.30,1814)

Tracy, Amy (Mrs.), consort of Samuel Tracy,Eaq. d.in Turnbridge, Vt (C.C.Oct.18,1806)

Traoy, Àndrew Dea. d.in Liabon,aged 86 (C.C.Jnly 11,1807)

Tracy, Aaaph d.in Pembroke, aged 75 (C.C.July 13,1799)

Tracy, BenJamin d.in Norwich, aged 75 (C.C.May 16,1832)

Tracy, Charles Capt. d,in Boston, 16th inst.,aged 56 yrs. (C.C.Nov.23,1831)

Tracy, Chester F., Lt.,late of the corps of the U.S.Artillery, d.in Fort St. Marks,E.F. (C.C.Sept.1,1821)

Tracy, Clement, native of Maine d.ln Fayetteville, N.C.,aged 27 (C.C.Oct.25,1826) |

Tracy, Daniel,formerly of Dover,Conn.,Rev.soldier d.in Boaton, [Oct.27,1833] aged 76 (C.C.Oot.30,1833)

Tracy, Eben Col. d.in Lisbon,aged 59 (C.C.Apr.6,1803)

Tracy, Eleanor (Mrs.), wife of Rev.Jos.Tracy, editor of Boston Recorder d.in Royalaton,aged 33 (C.c.Feb.27,1836)

Tracy, Eliphalet d.ln Franklin,aged 86 (C.C.Apr.1,1807)

Tracy, Elizabeth G.,formarly of Nantucket,d.in New Bedford, aged 56 (C.C.Mar.9,1833)

Tracy, Eunice (Mrs.),wife of Hezekiah d.in Shelburne,Vt.,aged 58 (C.C.Sept.28,1808)

Tracy, Francis,of N.Y.,seaman on bárk United States d.in Caloutta,Ang.l2th (Ç.C.Mar.9,1836)

Tracy, Fred Capt.,formerly of Norwich d.in Cape-Francois (C.C.Jaly 23,1803)

Tracy, Isaae Capt. d.in Caverack (C.C.Feb.25,1804)

Tracy, Jabez d.in Liabon, Conn.,aged 89,15th inat.(C.C.June 28, 1828)

Tracy, John d.in Presten,aged 63 (C.C.Hov.17,1798)

Tracy, John d.in Newburyport,aged 62 (C.C.May 6,1815)

Tracy, John, of the house of Lattin & Tracy and formerly of Boston d. in Matanzas, Aug.28th (C.C.Sept.25,1822)

Tracy, Lucy d.in Boston,aged 46 (C.C.Oct.14,1807)

Tracy, Margaret (Mrs.), wife of John Traoy, Esq in Heaburyport, age 52 (C.C.Nov. 12,1806)

Tracy, Mary (Mrs.), consort of Patrick Tracy, late of that town, d.in Newburyport (C.C.Dec.21,1791)

Tracy, Mary (Mrs.), widow of the late Hathanlel Tracy d.in Newburyport,aged 66 (C.C.Nov.6,1819)

Tracy, Mary d.ln Boston,aged 82 (C.C.June 17,1829)

Tracy, Mary (Mrs.), wife of Capt.Thos.Tracy d.in Boston,aged 83 (C.C.July 11,1829)

Tracy, Mary (Mrs.), widow of late Rev.Stephen Tracy d.in Norwich, aged 77 (C.C.Mar.1,1834)

Tracy, Mindwell (Mrs.), wife of David Tracy d.in Nowich, aged 55 (C.C.Jan.26,1833)

Tracy, Minot Capt. d.in Preston, aged 54 (C.C.Jan.6,1798)

Tracy, Nathaniel Hon. d.at Newburyport, (C.C.Sept.21,1796)

Tracy, Nathaniel (Mrs.), wife of Nath'l Tracy d.in Boston, aged 29 (C.C.Sept.3,1823)

Tracy, Nathaniel d.in Hinsdale, aged 81 (C.C.Jan.4,1832)

Tracy, Philemon Dr. d.at Norwich, Conn. (C.C.May 17,1837)

Tracy, Prudenoe (Mrs.), wife of Eleazer Tracy d.in Franklin (C.C.Mov.27,1813)

Tracy, S. d. in Turnbridge, aged 84 (C.C.Nov.18,1815)

Tracy, Samuel d. in Boston,aged 75 (C.C.June 13,1798)

Tracy, Simon d. in Fairsield, Conn.,aged 82 (C.C.Aug.24,1793)

Tracy, Stephen Decatur, son of Elisha Tracy d. in Norwich, Conn. aged 4,drowned (C.C.July 2,1817)

Tracy, Sybel (Mrs.) d. in Norwich, Conn.,aged 76 (C.C.Aug.21,1802) & (C.C.Sept.8,1802)

Tracy, Thomas Capt. d. at sea on passage from Havana to New Orléans, Mar.26th, aged 24 (C.C.May 29,1811)

Tracy, Thomas d. in Worcester, aged 77 (C.C.June 29,1833)

Tracy, Thomas d. at Marine Hospital,Washington Point,Va.,aged 36 (C.C.Pab.27,1839) (Long obituary notice)

Tracy, William d. in Boston, aged 37 (C.C.Aug.31 1825)

Tracy, Wllliam d. in New Orleans, aged 24 (C.C.June 31,1826)

 

 

 

1790 US Census

Aprepo Tracy Newburyport #090 (2 persons)

John Tracy Esq. Newburyport #090 (1 white male, 3 U16 white males, 8 white females)

Merriam Tracy Newburyport #089 (3 white males, 2 white females)

Nathaniel Tracy Esq. Newbury #087 (4 white males, 5 U16 white males, 13 white females)

 

1800 Census

Arpo Tracey, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

John Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Mary Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Meriam Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Nicholas Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

1810 Census

John Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Mariam Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Nicholas Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

Acts and resolves passed by the Legislature Commonwealth of Massachusetts For the political year 1810-11.

XXXVIII.

Resolve authorising William Farris to convey certain real estate to Eleazcr Johnson. June 21, 1811.

On the petition of William Farris, of Newburyport, in the county of Essex, merchant, setting forth, that he with the late Reverend Dr. Samuel Parker, of Boston, in the county of Suffolk, deceased, was authorised by a resolve of the General Court, passed on the first day of March, A. D. 1803, to sell and convey certain real estate belonging to the children of John Tracey, of said Newburyport, Esquire, and for reasons set forth in said petition, praying that he may have liberty to sell and convey, for the benefit of Elizabeth Farris Tracy, and Catharine Deblois Tracy, the two remaining minor children of said John Tracy, to Eleazer Johnson, of said Newburyport, merchant, their two sixth parts of the estate in said Newburyport, which was conveyed by John Lowell, Esq. to Patrick Tracy, Esq. by deed dated October 21, A.D. 1778, in like manner as the said William Farris and Samuel Parker might have done in the life time of the said Samuel Parker.

Resolved, That the "said William Farris be, and he hereby, is authorized to sell, and by deed duly acknowledged and recorded to convey to the said Eleazer Johnson, the said two sixth parts of said real estate belonging to the said two minor children of the said John Tracy, at and after the same rate and price for which the other four children of the said John Tracy have sold and coveyed to the said Eleazer Johnson, their four sixth parts of said estate, the said William Farris to conduct the said sale, and dispose of the proceeds thereof in the like manner, and on the like terms and conditions, in all respects, as he and the said Samuel Parker might and ought to have done, by virtue of the said former resolve, if the said Parker were now living.'

23d May, 1811, 30 76

Lanesborough, for boarding, clothing and doctoring Jerusha Welsh, and William Tracy, to 1st June, 1810

 

1820 Census

Margaret Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Lydia Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Dinah Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

1835 Service of the United States

Nathaniel Tracy, weighter and gauger, Boston, born Mass, $1750 compensation

 

1840 Census

Nathaniel Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

1842 The United States magazine and Democratic review

Raphael by John G. Whittier - Suggested by a portrait of Raphael at the age of fifteen, in the possession of Thomas Tracy, of Newburyport.

 

1848...Portland, Suco and Portsmouuth Rail Road Company

Helen Tracy, Newburyport, 5 shares

S. S. Tracy, Newburport, 5 shares

Androscoggin and Kennebec Rail Road Co.

Johnathan Tracey, jr., Webster, 500 stock

Laconia Company

Nathaniel Tracey, Boston, 2 shares

Saco Water Power Company

Nathaniel Tracy, Boston, 2 shares

York Manufacturing Company

Nathaniel Tracy, Boston, 2 shares

The legislature of the state of Maine, A.D. 1848

 

1850 Census

Louisa L Tracy, 62 years, b.  Massachusetts, 200 real estate, Residence: Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Helen Tracy, 54 years, b.  Massachusetts

Helen S Toys, 24 years, b. Nova Scotia

1850 Census

Thomas Tracy, 69 years, b.  Massachusetts, Cong? Clergyman, Residence: Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Ann Tracy, 72 years, b.  Massachusetts

Prudence Nichols, 28 years, b. Maine

 

1855 Annual report of the American Tract Society

Helen Tracy, Newburyport, Ms.

 

1855 Census - Ward 03, Newburyport, Essex

Louisa L Tracy  F 68 Massachusetts, United States 

Hellen Tracy  F 60 Massachusetts, United States 

Ann Kelly  F 25 Ireland 

1855 Census - Ward 04, Newburyport, Essex

Thomas Tracy  M 74 Massachusetts, United States 

Ann Tracy  F 78 Massachusetts, United States 

Prudence ? Michals  F 27 Maine, United States 

Hannah M Rounds  F  Massachusetts, United States 

 

1860 Census - Ward 3 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Louisa Tracy  F 73 Massachusetts 

Hellen Tracy  F 65 Massachusetts 

Anna Kelly  F 30 Ireland 

1860 Census - Ward 4 Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

Thomas Tracy  M 79 Massachusetts 

H M Rounds  F 25 Massachusetts  

1860 Census - Medford, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Nathaniel Tracy     M            65           Massachusetts, broker

Ann M Tracy                        F             55           Massachusetts

James E Allen                       M            40           Massachusetts

Hannah R Allen                    F             25           Massachusetts

Mary Allen                            F             16           Massachusetts

Nora Sullivan                        F             25           Ireland

 

1865 Census - Medford, Middlesex, Massachusetts

Nathaniel Tracy     M            70y         Massachusetts, merchant

Ann M Tracy                        F             64y         Massachusetts

James E Allen                       M            45y         Massachusetts

Anna K Allen                       F             34y         Massachusetts

 

May 1, 1866  A list of stockholders in the national banks of Boston.

The Columbian National Bank

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, 71 shares

Nathaniel Tracy, Medford 3 shares

Massachusetts National Bank

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, 19 shares

Merchants

Geo Dennie & F.U. Tracy, Trs. of Boston 13 shares

The New England National bank

Thomas Tracy, Newburyport, 10 shares

The Old Boston National Bank

Nathaniel Tracy, Medford 1 shares

 

1865 Newburyport Census

Hellen Tracey,  73 years, b. Massachusetts, Single, Newburyport, Ward 03, Essex, Massachusetts

Louisa Tracey, 76 years, b. Massachusetts, Single

Hannah Kelly, 23 years, b. Ireland, Single, domestic

Thomas Tracey, 84 years, b. Massachusetts, Widowed, Unitarian Clergyman, Newburyport, Ward 04, Essex, Massachusetts

Hannah M. Rounds, 35 years, domestic,

 

1870 Census - Ward 1 Newburyport MA [Tracys from Dunmore Co. Galway]

Patrick Tracy M 24 Ireland, work in shoe factory

Catharine Tracy F 27 Ireland 

Patrick S Tracy M 0 Massachusetts 

Daniel Tracy M 20 Ireland, work in shoe factory

Mary Tracy F 17 Ireland, work in cotton mill

Winnifred Tracy F 14 Ireland 

1870 Census - Ward 4 Newburyport

Thomas Tracy  M 89 Massachusetts, Ret Clergyman

Hannah Rounds  F 40 Massachusetts 

 

1880 US Census

Household:

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 John TRACY 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 27 

 MA 

 Keeping Restaurant 

 MA 

 MA 

 Adelade M.T. TRACY 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 31 

 MA 

 

 MA 

 MA 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

1st Ward, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

Family History Library Film

1254531

 

NA Film Number

T9-0531

 

Page Number

402B

 

Household:

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 Isaac CHARLES 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 34 

 IRE 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Margaret CHARLES 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 33 

 IRE 

 Keeping House 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Isabella T. CHARLES 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 10 

 MA 

 At School 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Thos. W. CHARLES 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 8 

 MA 

 At School 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Maggie CHARLES 

 Dau 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 4 

 MA 

 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Warren P. CHARLES 

 Son 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 2 

 MA 

 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 Bart MCDERMOTT 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 30 

 SCOTLAND 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 SCOTLAND 

 SCOTLAND 

 Willie BRAGG 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 18 

 ENG 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 ENG 

 ENG 

 Jas. TRACY 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 32 

 MA 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 IRE 

 IRE 

 John TRACY 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 28 

 MA 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 MA 

 MA 

 John SCHOULER 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 25 

 SCOTLAND 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 SCOTLAND 

 SCOTLAND 

 Alex. WARNER 

 Other 

 S 

 Male 

 W 

 40 

 ENG 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 ENG 

 ENG 

 Jenette MCMASTERS 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 36 

 SCOTLAND 

 Work Cotton Mill 

 SCOTLAND 

 SCOTLAND 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

Family History Library Film

1254532

 

NA Film Number

T9-0532

 

Page Number

499D

 

Household:

 Name 

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

 John F. BROWN 

 Self 

 M 

 Male 

 W 

 49 

 MA 

 Telegraph Operator 

 NH 

 MA 

 Ellen T. BROWN 

 Wife 

 M 

 Female 

 W 

 46 

 MA 

 Keeping House 

 MA 

 MA 

 Mary J. TRACY 

 Other 

 S 

 Female 

 W 

 20 

 IRE 

 Servant 

 IRE 

 IRE 

Source Information:

 

Census Place

Ward 3, Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts

 

Family History Library Film

1254532

 

NA Film Number

T9-0532

 

Page Number

450A

 

 

 

BOSTON DIRECTORIES

 

1789 Boston Directory

None.

 

1796 Boston Directory

None.

 

1798 Boston Directory

Tracy Charles, watch maker, No. 51, Newbury street.

 

1800 Boston Directory

Tracy Daniel, housewright, Lynn street.

 

1803 Boston Directory

Tracey Daniel, housewright, Lynn street. [Captain? moved to Dover N.H. with wife Abigail]

 

1806 Boston Directory

None.

 

1807 Boston Directory

None.

 

1809 Boston Directory

None.

 

1810 Boston Directory

Tracy John, jun. merchant 64 Broad street [of Newburyport?]

 

1813 Boston Directory

None.

 

1816 Boston Directory

Capt. Tracy, Hancock Street

Tracy Charles, capt. house Hancock st.

Africans...Tracy Peter, Belknap st.

 

1818 Boston Directory

Deputy Collector of Customs, Nathaniel Tracy.

Tracy Charles, capt. house Hancock street

Coloured Persons...Peter Tracey, school master Belknap street

 

1820 Boston Directory

Tracy Charles, captain, house Chambers street

Tracy Nathaniel, deputy collector of customs, Washington place

Tracy William, cordwainer, Court street

 

1821 Boston Directory

Tracy. Charles, capt. mariner, Chambers street

Tracy Nathaniel, deputy collector, KneeJand st.

Tracy Patrick, labourer, Water street

Tracy William, agent State Prison ware house, Exchange st. house back 30 Elm street

Coastwise Clearance Department...J. Tracy (Permits for Sailors to be admitted to the Hospitals)

 

1822 Boston Directory

Tracy Charles, capt. Chambers

Tracy Nathaniel, deputy. collector, Kneeland

Tracy Patrick, labourer, Wharf

Tracy William, cordwainer, house back 30 Elm

Tracy Mary, widow, Purchase

 

1823 Boston Directory

Tracy Charles, capt. Chambers

Tracy Nathaniel, deputy collector, h. Hayward place

Tracy Patrick, labourer, Theatre alley

Tracy William, cordwainer, house Marston place, Chambers

 

1832 Boston Directory

Tracy Mark, laborer, rear 134 Ann

Tracy Mary, widow, rear 41 Congress

Tracy Nathan, weigher and guager, Custom House

 

1836 Boston Directory

Tracy Charles, housewright, house 6 Southac court

Tracy Joseph, editor Boston Recorder, 9 Cornhill

Tracy Mary, widow, h. rear 41 Congress

Tracy Nathaniel, weigher and guager, Custom House

 

1857 The Boston Directory

Tracey John, distiller, 13 E. Clinton

Tracy Ann, widow, h. Colony

Tracy Anthony, shoemaker, h. E, near Sullivan

Tracy Cornelius, laborer, h. 136 Cambridge

Tracy Frederick U. city treasurer, City Hall, h. 58 Chestnut

Tracy Harvey N. 16 Federal, h. Morton p1.

Tracy Henry, iron fence maker, h. 95 . Cedar

Tracy Henry R. ed. Herald, 103 Wash. h. 20 Pitts

Tracy James, shoemaker, h. Erin alle , E. B.

Tracy John, bootmaker, 4 Bridge, h. do.

Tracy John, bootmaker, h. 89 ssex

Trac Joseph Rev. sec. Massachusetts Colonization Society, 26 Joy‘s building, h. at Beverly

Tracy Joseph, blacksmith, h. 4 Stillman pl.

Tracy Julia, widow, h. 57 Lincoln block

Tracy Mary, widow, h. 141 Essex

Tracy Nathaniel, 46 State, h. at W. Medford

Tracy Parker, tailor, h. 92 Endicott [born Ireland, brother of Patrick?]

Tracy Patrick, laborer, h. 33 Merrimac

Tracy Sylvester L. britannia. worker, h. 89 Tyler

Tracy Thomas, upholsterer, 161 Hanover, house 16 Prospect

Tracy William, teamster, h. 61 E. Dedham

Tracy William, laborer, h. Third, n. P

Tracy William, mason, h. 155 Congress

Tracy William C. F. tailor, h. 31 Vine

 

1860 Boston Directory

Tracey John & Co. (D. A. Patch), d;,tillers, 69 Clinton

Tracy & Harvison (P. H. Tracy and J. Harvison), tailors, 37 Exchange

Tracy Austin W. teamster, b. r. 160 Chelsea, near fMarion, E. B.

Tracy Christopher, deputy inspector flour, 32 City

Tracy Frederick U. city treasnrer, City Hall, h. 58 Cbestnut

Tracy Henry A. gas6tter, b. 67 Revere

Tracy Henry R. editor "Herald," 103 Wasb. b. at Roxbury

Tracy Henry, clothes cleaner, 102 Portland

Tracy James, boiler maker, bouse 11 !o'ifth

Tracy John, boiler maker, house 11 Fifth

Tracy John, bootmaker, 4 Bridge, bouse do.

Tracy Joseph Rev. sec. MaS$&cbusetts Colonization Society, 26 Joy's building. bouse at Beverly

Tracy Julia, widow, bouse 18 Curve

Tracy P. F., Dedbam Express, 3 Washington

Tracy Parker, tailor, bouse 100 Endicott

Tracy Patrick H. (Tracy & Harvison), tailor, 37 Exchange, house 46 Lowell

Tracy Patrick, bootmaker, house rear 36 Tyler

Tracy Simon, laborer. house 76 Gold

Tracy Syvesterter L. britannia worker. bds. 49 Eliot

Tracy William C. F. police station 2, h. 31 Vine

Tracy William P. hostler, housc Fourth, near P

Tracy William P. laborer, house First, n. Doreh'r

Appleton, Tracy, & Co. ( James Appleton jr. and R. E. Robbins), American wntches,l63 Wash.

English High School Association. Frederic U. Tracy, President.

Frederic U. Tracy, City and County Treasurer and Collector. Office, City Hall. Salary, $3250, and $6500 for permanent assistant clerks. [Chosen by City Council, in Convention, in May.)

Mass. Colonization Society. Rev. Joseph Tracy, Secretary and Agent Office, 81 Washington Street. Chosen in May

Truslees Of Donations For Education In Liberia. Incorporated, 1860. Rev. Joseph Tracy, D. D., Secretary 81 Washingtomn Street.

wharf, house 18 Curve

 

 

 

" Boston, May, 15th, 1865. To the Chairman of Sellectmen [sic] of the town of Lincoln Mass. Sir. I would respectfully request to know if you have decided to pay Mr. Parker Tracy State aid for his Son who is credited to your town. And Enlisted under his mothers name. Francis G. Devine of Boston 2.d Heavy Arty. Mass. Vols. A few lines in answer would be thankfully received by his Father Parker Tracy, No. 17. Endicott St Boston, Mass. Yours Respectfully, Parker Tracy To the Chairman of Sellectmen [sic] of Lincoln, Mass. "

letter.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

Last update: 28 March 2017