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 Treacy Brothers of Carrick-on-Suir Tipperary and New Jersey

 

 

The following three brothers have played an important role in the development of the Roman Catholic Church, especially in the United States.

 

1.       Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy (1843-1907)

 

Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy, was born at Carrick-on-Suir, Ireland, in 1843. He was educated at a private school (at the select school of the Christian Brothers), and at the Classical Academy of his native town. He received his theological training in the Ecclesiastical Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, Philadelphia, and was ordained priest at the age of twenty-three. From 1866 to 1868 he was attached to St. Michael's Church, Philadelphia, where he endeared himself to the people by his attention to the cholera patients, and his zeal for the Christian education of the young. As curate to Vicar-General Walsh, of Philadelphia; to the venerable Father Maher, of Norristown, and to the learned and venerable Father Cauvin, of Hoboken, Father Treacy has had the best opportunities of learning his duties from distinguished pastors, who were trained in their professional functions in the great cities of New York and Philadelphia. Among his Professors in the faculties of theology and philosophy Father Treacy can name Bishops O'Hara, of Scranton, and O'Connor, of Omaha, the celebrated divine, Rev. Dr. Balfe, and Rev. Dr. Keogh, whose magnificent display at the examination in Rome won the admiration of the Pope himself. To indicate how high Father Treacy stood in the Seminary for talent and literary ability, it is only necessary to state that he was selected by Dr. Keogh to write the Theological Essay, and that the whole staff of Professors came specially to hear Father Treacy read it, and that he was called upon to read it over again, when Archbishop Wood was present at the annual examination. Father Treacy is an ardent Irish patriot. He advocates home Rule for Ireland, and even further, the total separation of Ireland from England. In the words of Henry Grattan, “ He will not be satisfied so long as the humble cottager in Ireland has a link of the British chain clanking to him.”  

 

Allusion has been made in previous issues to Father Treacy’s labors as pastor of Washington, Oxford, and Belvidere, N. J. Oxford has become closely associated with his name in his literary, philosophical and poetical contributions to ‘Donahoe's Magazine’ and other periodicals. 

 

In 1883, he became the pastor of St. Paul’s Catholic Church, Burlington, New Jersey. For several years Father Treacy led a quiet and studious life. In 1892, it was reported that his behaviour was becoming erratic and there followed a confrontation Bishop O’Farrell of Trenton, when he decided to remove Father Patrick Treacy from his charge at Burlington. His brother Father William Treacy took up the case against the Bishop, who retailiated. His other brother, Mr. James Treacy then got involved, (see below)

 

Fr. Patrick Treacy (2nd Resident Pastor) 1873-1882 St Joseph Parish, Washington, NJ

 

Rev. P.A. Treacy (1888) “Views of the Modern Scientists and ancient Fathers of the Church on the Origin of Man” Donohoe’s Magazine.

 

2.       James J. Treacy (1849-)

 

He was a renowned writer and editor of Roman Catholic publications. Two of his books received a benediction from Pope Leo XIII.

 

“Our Holy Father, Pope Leo XIII., has been graciously pleased to impart his Apostolic Benediction, for the second time, to the Author of this Book. His Holiness has also deigned to honor Mr. Treacy with the present of an exquisitely executed cameo, representing St. Joseph and the Infant Saviour, the work of a distinguished Roman Artist.” [Note: Kirby was a friend of Pope Leo XIII]

 

Treacy, James J. editor (1880) Historical and Biographical Stories, Sketches, Ankcdotes, etc. Messrs. Noonan & Co., Boston.

Treacy, James J. editor (1882) Catholic Flowers from Protestant Gardens.  P. J. Kennedy, New York

Treacy, James J. (1885) Tributes of Protestant Writers to the Truth and Beauty of Catholicity. Fr. Pustet, New York & Cincinnati

Treacy, James J. (1888) Conquests of our Holy Faith; or, Testimonies of Distinguished Converts. Fr. Pustet, New York & Cincinnati

 

 

 

3.       Rev. William P. Treacy (1850 – 1906)

 

Father William P. Treacy, S. J., was ordained in Louvain, Belgium. In 1885 he was pastor at Woodstock College, Maryland, He was the author of the celebrated poetic “Lines to Rev. A. J. Ryan," and of a series of most interesting and patriotic, historical articles on “Irish Students in Continental Universities." While staying at Louvain, he availed himself of the opportunity to examine the original documents relating to the illustrious Irish ecclesiastics and soldiers, who, having been driven by British oppression from their native land, had won merited fame in the universities, courts and camps of Continental Europe.  He was the author of a number of significant books on catholic history.

 

He was also pastor of St. Mary’s Church Swedeborough, New Jersey when there was a confrontation with Bishop O’Farrell.

 

Rev. William P. Treacy Swedesboro, 1887 (Sadliers' Catholic directory)

Rev. William P. Treacy. St. Joseph's Rectory, Swedesboro, New Jersey. 1889

Rev. William P. Treacy, pastor of St. Gabriel's church at Bradevelt (Marlboro, New Jersey) 1899

 

Treacy, William P. (1887) Irish Scholars of the Penal Days: Glimpses of their labours on the Continent of Europe. Pustet & Co., New York.

Treacy, William P. (1889) Old Catholic Maryland and Its Early Jesuit Missionaries. St. Joseph's Rectory, Swedesboro, New Jersey

Treacy, Rev. William P. "A Biographical Sketch of Father Robert Molyneux, S.J.," American Catholic Quarterly Review, XI, 140- 153, 1886.

 

Rev. Fr. W. P. Treacy:

v Lord, Let me see thy lovely face

v My God, I'm tired of Worldly thoughts

v Holy Spirit, come and guide me

v Thou knowest master, that my heart is thine

v Holy Faith! O Sacred Light!

The Marist Brother (1913) American Catholic hymnal. P.J. Kenedy & Sons, NY.

https://books.google.ie/books?id=vzKNBgAAQBAJ&lpg=PA89&ots=2d_qtRjxJX&dq

 

https://www.hymnary.org/person/Treacy_WP1

 

 

 

 

FAMILY HISTORY

 

Thomas Tracey & Alicia/Louisa Lahy

Joannes Tracey b. 23 Jun 1847 of Bridge? lane Sp. Jacobo Quirk & Maria Anna Connell Carrick-on-Suir Parish

Jacobus Tracey b. 5 Feb 1849 of Bridge lane Sp. Joan Phelan & Marg Marks? Carrick-on-Suir Parish

Gulielmus b. 20/24 Nov 1850 of Bridge Lane Sp. Michael Phelan & Anna Macks Carrick-on-Suir Parish

 

1870 Census - 110 87th District Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States

Thomas Tracy                       Male       56           Ireland, salesman

Louisa Tracy                         Female    50           Ireland

William Tracy                       Male       18           Ireland, sells books

James Tracy                          Male       20           Ireland, sells books

 

1880 US Census

Household: Washington, Warren, New Jersey

Name

Relation

Marital Status

Gender

Race

Age

Birthplace

Occupation

Father's Birthplace

Mother's Birthplace

Patrick A. TRACY

Self

S

Male

W

37

IRE

Catholic Priest

IRE

IRE

Louisa TRACY

Mother

W

Female

W

64

IRE

At Home

IRE

IRE

Margaret SMITH

Other

W

Female

W

57

IRE

Housekeeper

IRE

IRE

John J. SMITH

Other

S

Male

W

12

NJ

At Home

IRE

IRE

Thomas MACK

Other

S

Male

W

12

NJ

At Home

IRE

IRE

 

Louisa T. Treacy died 23 Jan 1887 Burlington New Jersey, age 70, b. 1816 Ireland, resident 16 years

 

Lay People.

Mrs. Louisa Treacy, wife of the late Thomas Treacy, of Carrick-on-Suir, Ireland, died piously at Burlington, N. J., on January 23d. She had been in feeble health for years, and for some time past, seemed only to be waiting for the call of her Divine Master. During her whole life, Mrs. Treacy was noted for the sweetness of her disposition, and the holy calm  of her soul. These beautiful qualities were hers up to the moment she passed from this life, without a sigh, and with- out a struggle. She was a truly Christian, Catholic mother. In her last moments she had the consolation of being attended by her eldest son, Rev. P. A. Treacy, pastor of Burlington. Her reverend son also imparted to her a special Plenary Indulgence, granted to her by his Holiness, Pope Leo XIII. A solemn Mass of Requiem was offered up at St. Paul's Church on January 26th, for the repose of her soul. A large number of friends and sympathizers were present. Rev. P. A. Treacy was celebrant; her nephew, Rev. John P. Lonargan, of New York, was deacon; her youngest son, Rev. W. P. Treacy, pastor of Swedesboro, was sub- deacon; Rev. Father Reynolds, pastor of the Church of the Sacred Heart, Mount Holly, was master of ceremonies. In the sanctuary were Rev. Patrick F. Connolly, pastor of St. Mary’s, Bordentown, and ‘Rev. Father Reardon, of the Theological Seminary, Vineland. Mr. James J. Treacy, of Philadelphia, her other only surviving son, was also present on the occasion. May her soul rest in peace!

Donahoe’s Magazine, Vol. XVII. January, 1887, To July, 1887. Boston: Thomas B. Noonan & Company. 1887.  

 

Tobias Kirby, Rector of the Irish College Rome was a cousin as was Rev. John P. Lonergan.

 

Rev. P. A. Treacy, of Burlington N.J.

...Rev. William P. Treacy...Mrs. James J. Treacy.

This volume is respectfully and humbly dedicated in gratitude for the memorial proposed by Rev. P. A. Treacy.

John Gilmary Shea (1890) History of the Catholic Church in the United States. Volume III. D.H. McBride & Co, Akron, O.

 

 

Saint Pauls Cemetery, Burlington, Burlington County, New Jersey

Rev Patrick A. Treacy 1843-1907

Pastor St. Pauls Church 1885-1892

Rev William P. Treacy 1850-1906

Rev John J. Hill 1857-1894

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7864552

 

 

 

Reverend Fathers Treacys of New Jersey and Bishop O’Farrell of Trenton

 

The following account and has been compiled mainly from newspaper reports of the time, as there does not appear to have been any other published accounts.

 

Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy was the pastor of St. Paul’s Catholic Church, Burlington, New Jersey. In newspaper reports, it was stated that his behaviour was becoming erratic. On 2nd May 1892, he ordered a parishioner named Matthew Gaynor out of the church at gunpoint because he had allowed his daughter to socialize with a protestant. It was reported that he had repeatedly defied the orders of the Bishop of Trenton, the Right Rev. M. Joseph O’Farrell. The Bishop went to see him and Father P.A. Treacy chased him out of the house with a revolver. Sometime later a commission was appointed by the Court and Father P.A. Treacy was pronounced insane and was incarcerated in an asylum. He was deposed from the pastorate of St. Paul’s by the Bishop. He was later discharged as cured and released on a promised to travel in Europe. He went to Rome and made charges against his superior. Subsequently, he intended to bring a suit for $50,000 against Bishop O’Farrell for committing him to the asylum.

 

It was reported that Monsignor Satolli was sent to the United States as the Apostolic Archbishop in order to settle disputes mainly between bishops and priests. In the New York Times of the 4th February 1893, it reports that Mgr. Satolli, interviewed Rev. William P. Treacy pastor of St. Mary’s Church Swedeborough, New Jersey, the brother of Rev. P. A. Treacy, and decided in his favour and against Bishop O’Farrell. This is contrary to the events that followed.

 

On the 19th February a letter from the Bishop was read in St. Paul’s church denouncing Father P.A. Treacy, who was celebrating mass in the house of Patrick Collins in defiance of the Bishop’s order. On the 5th March, Bishop O’Farrell, placed Rev. W.P. Treacy and the Rev. P.A. Treacy under the ban and notified the catholic of the diocese not to affiliate with them. As a result of supporting his brother, Father W.P. Treacy was removed as pastor of St. Mary’s Church, by the Bishop. In Father Treacy’s account he stated that the Bishop had initially ordered that he should go into a spiritual retreat for ten days and then serve the parish of Swedesborough for a period of three years on probation. This move by the bishop was met with a whirlwind of opposition from the parishioners. Father W.P. Treacy had been there for five years and had the strong support of the parishioners. He was advised not to submit to the order and open war was at once declared.

 

The case was the referred to Mgr. Satolli who recommended that the brothers be relieved of duty. They refused to acknowledge either Mgr. Satolli or Bishop O’Farrell, because they claimed their case was pending in Rome. On 7th March, McFaul the Vicar General of the Trenton diocese issued a proclamation excommunicating the Rev P.A. Treacy and Rev. W.P. Treacy, at the request of the Bishop.

 

A Father Walter Leahy arrived to take over the Swedesborough Parish but Father W.P. Treacy refused to turn over the church to him. Civil proceedings were then taken by both sides for the control of the church property and contents. The sheriff decided to give possession of the church to Father Treacy and the contents to Father Leahy but then decided to forestall his decision. Both sides conducted their own church services in private houses, which were supported equally by parishioners. Subsequently, Father Leahy obtained possession of the church while Father Treacy held possession of the parish house.

 

In a report of the 15th March, Father W.P. Treacy restated Mgr. Satolli, earlier position against Bishop O’Farrell.

 

In a report of the 20th March, the stalemate was continuing with the rival priests still excluded from the church building and celebrating mass in private houses. The congregation for Father Leahy was increasing as parishioners feared excommunication if they supported Father W.P. Treacy. On 2nd April, 46 parishioners attended Father W.P. Treacy’s service to the 138 attending Father Leahy, however the collection at Father W.P. Treacy’s service was stated to be twice as large as Father Leahy.

 

On 9th April, the Bishop visited Swedesboro with vicar-general McFaul, and celebrated mass to a packed church of townspeople, eager to hear his sermon. He stated that those who returned to the flock would be pardoned, otherwise they would be denied the sacraments. He said that Father P.A. Treacy, formerly of Burlington, had made threats against McFaul. Father W.P. Treacy continued to say mass at the house of Edward Monahan, where there were only three persons present.

 

In a report of the 18th April of the New Jersey Court of Chancery, the position of Mgr. Satolli as spokesman for the Holy See was challenged. Counsel for Father W.P. Treacy further denied that he had violated any law of the Church and stated that the Bishop O’Farrell was well known for ignoring and contemning the law of the Church as established by cannon law. He also claimed that his case was pending at Rome.

 

On 27th April, Mgr. Satolli had to testify in Washington to prove his credentials. He also stated that on 25th April Father W.P. Treacy had called on him to ask to be relieved of his sentence of excommunication and that he had offered to grant his request providing he would apologize to the Bishop. Father W.P. Treacy said he would do so provided he was restored to his parish at Swedesborough. Since this was a matter for decision by Bishop O’Farrell, Father W.P. Treacy had left the matter pending.

 

On 2nd May, the Vice Chancellor of New Jersey, refused to eject Father W.P. Treacy from the parsonage of Swedesborough.

 

In newspaper reports at this time, Father W.P. Treacy was labelled a hero. With regard to his character, it was reported that he had risked his life three times to save others. “His first heroic act was to rescue a colored boy from death in the Chesapeake bay during a terrible storm when even the trained life guards flinched. In 1878 the priest jumped into the Bronx near Fordham college and saved the life of James Murphy. When the village of Aeganhoven in Belgium was destroyed by fire, Father Treacy directed the work of the rescuers from the roofs of the burning buildings and left them only after every man, woman and child had been accounted for.”

 

On the 31st May, the suits in the Court of Chancery and the Supreme Court were withdrawn and Father W.P. Treacy was to be paid $500, the amount due to him from the parish accounts. There had been insinuations that he had made free with the parish funds.

 

In accounts of the 15th August 1893, Father W.P. Treacy was restored to his Swedesboro parish with all censures removed by Mgr. Satolli. He also received a letter of recommendation to all the bishops in the country. The followers of Father W.P. Treacy were jubilant over his restoration. Bishop O’Farrell said that he was willing to forgive him if the apology had been made in the proper spirit.

 

In the letter of the 31st December 1894, Father P. A. Treacy to Kirby, it states that his brother, Father William Treacy, having been appointed a curate by Dr. McFaul.

 

March 30 1906 The New Brunswick Daily Times

Rev. Father William P. Treacy, who had been pastor of St. Josephs Catholic church at Millstone for the past two years died at the rectory there shortly before midnight on Wednesday [March 28, 1906]...born in Tipperary, Ireland, 56 years ago...no relatives in this country... 

March 31, 1906 New Brunswick Daily Times

Treacy - At St. Joseph's Rectory, East Millstone, NJ on March 28 1906, Rev William P. Treacy, of Tipperary, Ireland, aged 56 years.

Friends are invited to attend the funeral at St. Josephs Church, on Monday morning at 9 o'clock.

The body will lay in state for friends to view the remains in St. Josephs Church after 3 pm Sunday afternoon.

 

 

Correspondence from Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy to Tobias Kirby, Rector, Irish College Rome.

http://www.irishcollege.org/archive.htm

 

22 December [1879] Holograph letter from P. A. Treacy, St. Joseph's, Washington, Warren Co., New Jersey, to Kirby: Informed that he is related to Kirby. His present post. Congratulations on dignity lately conferred on recepient by Pope.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

28 February 1880 Holograph note from P A Tracy, Missionary Rector of St. Item Joseph's Church, Washington, Warren Co, New Jersey, U.S. to Dr. Kirby. Tracy sends his most respectful regards and gives his address.

The New Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

16 August 1880 Holograph letter from P. A. Treacy, Washington, to Kirby: Sends books.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

31 May 1881 Holograph letter from Patrick Treacy, St. Joseph's Church, Washington, New Jersey, U. S., to Kirby: Congratulations. Sent book as present.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

12 August 1881 Holograph letter from Patrick A. Treacy, Oxford, New Jersey, U.S.A., to Kirby: Is he to be a Bishop of Omaha?

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

 22 October 1881 Holograph letter from P. A. Treacy, New Jersey, U.S.A., to Kirby: Informs Dr. Kirby that reports prevailing in the diocese about his appointment to Omaha were untrue.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

25 October 1881 Holograph letter from P. A. Treacy, New Jersey, U.S.A., to Kirby: Thanks Dr. Kirby for favour. Sends books as token.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

5 June 1882 Holograph letter from P. A. Treacy, St. Rose's Church, Oxford, New Jersey, to Kirby: Books, one for Pope, one for Dr. Kirby which have been written by writer's brother.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

18 February 1884 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Oxford, to Kirby: Sending the Catholic Directory for 1884, just to hand.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

18 April 1885 Holograph letter from P.A. Treacy, Oxford, New Jersey, to Kirby: Enclosing two copies of brother's book - 'Tributes from Protestant to the Truth and Beauty of Catholicity', one for the Pope and one for Kirby. Gives family news.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

28 July 1885 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Oxford, New Jersey, to Kirby: Writer informs Kirby that he is sending him two copies of the 'Tributes' adding that his brother wishes Kirby to dispose of them as he sees fit.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

28 March 1886 Holograph letter from Rev. Patrick A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: Letter of thanks for plenary indulgence 'in articulo mortis'.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

17 June 1886 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Writer's name has been sent to Rome for diocese of Wilmington; Cardinal of Baltimore favours Fr. Gross, priests favour Fr. Keily, most of Bishops favour Fr. Treacy - asks Kirby to pray that God's Will be done.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

18 October 1886 Holograph letter from Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy, New Jersey, to Kirby: As writer and brother, Rev. William P. Treacy, wish to travel 'in the interests of Catholic literature', they ask Kirby to obtain for them title and privileges of Missionaries Apostolic, and also faculties in dioceses of Ephesus and Goa.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

15 February 1887 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Writer tells of desire from childhood to be a martyr - forced, through parents' dependence, to take a parish, but now free by reason of their deaths. Asks Kirby's prayers that his petition to be permitted to join Franciscans be granted.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

1 August 1887 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Sends copy of his brother's work, 'Irish Scholars on the Continent of Europe'.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

15 August 1887 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: Writer requests that permission be obtained for his brother's new book to be dedicated to the Pope.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

19 June 1888 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Writer sends three presentation copies of his brother's new book. Other news regarding brother's books etc.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

25 August 1888 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Sends book for Kirby's acceptance - has asked his 'old pastor' at Nice to write to Cardinal Simeoni as he thinks he could do Church service if he were made Bishop.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

8 November 1888 Holograph letter from Rev. Patrick A. Treacy, Burlington, to Kirby: Encloses letter from newly-elected President of the U.S.A., General Harrison in reply to one from writer warning him against 'arch-infidel Ingersoll' etc. Gives details of personal activities in the past regarding politics.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

26 August 1889 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: Encloses 2 copies of 'Old Catholic Maryland and its early Jesuit Missionaries', by his brother, the one bound in white silk velvet being for the Pope, and the one in purple for himself. His other lay brother, James J. Treacy, is preparing a book to be entitled 'Poetic Crystals of Catholic thought'.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

[circa 23 September 1889] Printed advertisement soliciting funds for a testimonial to the Item distinguished Catholic historian, John Gilmary Shea being collected by Rev. P. A. Treacy. Includes letter of support to Treacy from Cardinal Gibbons the Archbishop of Baltimore and a list of subscribers including many clergymen.

The New Collection Catalogue

 

5 February 1890 Holograph letter from Rev. John P. Lonergan to Kirby: Addressed to 'Most Reverend and Dear Cousin', writer reminds Kirby that on his ordination 'about 5 years ago' another cousin, Fr. Treacy, sent his photograph. Gives a few details of himself, but most of letter concerns his brother, who should have been ordained the December before but who, on account of 'a foolish prank' was sent to a Trappist Monastery in Gethsemane, Kentucky, 'where the degraded among our clergy are sent to reform'. Asks Kirby to use his influence to have this punishment reduced.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

9 February 1891 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Rector, Burlington, U.S.A., to Kirby: Writer has sent Kirby 'per mail' Catholic Directory 1891. Gives details of testimonial fund for Dr. Shea for which, through exertions of writer, nearly $2,000 were collected - practical gratitude of Dr. Shea, and kindness of Cardinal Gibbons. Regarding 'buried history' in letters written by priests in America to friends in Ireland - emigration from Waterford. Asks Kirby if he could indicate 'some persons in that neighbourhood' who might assist writer and Dr. Shea in turning up information in which they are most interested.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

20 February 1891 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: Writer sends 3rd volume of John Gilmary Shea's 'History of the Catholic Church in the United States', which is dedicated to Fr. Treacy in conjunction with Cardinal Gibbons and other contributors to the J.G. Shea Testimonial Fund. Writer would like Kirby to obtain from Pope 'some token of appreciation of the valuable services rendered to the Church by Dr. Shea during his long literary career. The Jesuit College of Georgetown has given him the degree of Doctor of Laws. If possible the writer would like to have him made Chevalier, Commendatore, or Knight of St. Gregory. No Catholic writer living deserves better of the Church …'

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

30 May 1891 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, U.S.A., to Kirby: Regarding refusal of American bishop to have Irish priests in his diocese, as he 'did not feel justified' in doing so, as he had more applications than he needed for his own diocese. Writer has therefore started 'The Association of St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland', which has for its object the assisting of deserving young men to become priests on the American mission, as he thinks it is only fair in view of the steady stream of Irish immigrants. Writer names a few illustrious Irish bishops in America, and asks Kirby to obtain blessing of Pope for new Association.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

13 June 1891 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: As soon as the Association of St. Patrick, Apostle of Ireland, has sufficient funds, writer intends to found some burses in the Irish College for those young Irish priests who will work in America. Has just written to Propaganda regarding this project.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

30 June 1891 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, N.J., to Kirby: Writer tells of blessing of Almighty God on his Association of St. Patrick, in that the Rev. J. McGuckin, Superior of the University of Ottawa, will take 100 Irish students who have completed their Classical Course, 'and will educate them free through Philosophy and Theology, and have them ordained priests of his Order - the Oblates of Mary Immaculate'. Encloses printed leaflet regarding the Association.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

30 January 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Burlington, U.S.A., to Kirby: Writer thanks Kirby for copy of his book. Has asked publishers to send Kirby American Catholic Directory for 1892. Regarding personal health. Asks Kirby to obtain for himself, his friends and benefactors a Plenary Indulgence at time of death - also 'some sufficient recognition' of his services in raising volunteers in 1840 [1860?] to fight for the Pope under O'Reilly, etc., 200 men prepared to go, but delay occurred. Writer only 17 years old at the time. Now asks military decoration of St. Gregory, which he 'would have won' by his services in the field if opportunities had been afforded him.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

1 September 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, New Jersey to Kirby: Writer hopes to leave for Rome on 3rd September, and to pay his respects both to the Pope and to Kirby

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

23 September 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: As advised by Kirby, writer called at Propaganda only to learn that Mgr. Persico is in France. Perhaps it is just as well, however, as he has decided against lodging a complaint against Bishop O'Farrell. Gives reasons and details of course he means to pursue.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

26 September 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer thanks Kirby for his letter. He may have to trouble him with correspondence in connection with his case, but does not wish Kirby to bother to reply to this letter, as any advice Kirby has for him can be given on Kirby's return to Rome.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

26 September 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P.A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer asks Kirby to forward any letters which arrive for him at the College and gives his address. Has received celebret and has said Mass twice at Church of the Holy Guardian Angels. Encloses copy of circular issued 'by the vast majority of the congregation of St. Paul's Church, Burlington', while the writer was confined in a lunatic asylum. Gives details of how a Fr. [Speirings] who came to Rome to seek redress against Bishop O'Farrell was kept so long by Propaganda and had to spend much money, over $2000, and all to no avail, the case having been decided against him. Writer has heard that he had since died of a broken heart. Gives details of his own 'imprisonment' in the asylum and of the Bishop's actions. Also of a priest who accuses the Bishop of immorality and the Bishop's dealings with him.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

29 September 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: In order to remove the impression made on Cardinal Gibbons by writer's confinement in an asylum, he has sent him an enclosed letter. The Cardinal [Gibbons] has shown himself friendly. The writer presented the Cardinal with 'a large and beautiful portrait of himself'' to show his appreciation of the assistance the Cardinal gave the writer when latter was collecting for Dr. Shea's memorial. Writer's brother also dedicated a book he wrote to the Cardinal.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

3 October 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer is sorry that he came to Rome, as his opinion of the administration of the Church is now changed. Mentions the case of Fr. Coyne, of Galway who was told that his case had been heard twice, when a Cardinal assured him that it had not been heard at all, although nearly two years in Rome. Also tells of Fr. Spierings, who died of a broken heart and gives some details of his treatment by his bishop [O'Farrell]. Writer came to the conclusion that 'Bishop O'Farrell deserved death and I saw no other way of vindicating myself than by killing him. This was no temporary excitement. I went to work deliberately about it. I said Mass to know God's will. I felt that by giving my life on the scaffold for having killed the blighter of my reputation Bp. O'Farrell, I should have proved my innocence. My friends concurred in the view that I was perfectly justified in killing Bp. O'Farrell. My brother came and showed me a letter in which Bp. O'Farrell declared he would deprive me of my parish. He begged me not to bring the disgrace on him of having him pointed out as the brother of the priest who shot Bp. O'Farrell'. [Much more in the same vein.]

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

10 October 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer sees nothing for it but to return to Burlington at once and commence prosecution of Bishop O'Farrell 'for conspiracy and false imprisonment', claiming damages at $50.000. Letter wholly concerns dealings with Bishop O'Farrell.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

15 October 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer thanks Kirby for forwarding the letter from his brother, which advises him that 'the fight has begun in earnest' between Bishop O'Farrell and the Treacy brothers. Gives details again of the Bishop's actions - now the only course, if the Pope and Propaganda will not help, is to bring a case against the Bishop in the American courts.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

21 October 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, to Kirby: Writer asks Kirby to obtain for self and all his 'faithful friends' plenary indulgence at hour of death.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

10 November 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Does not call on Kirby for fear of compromising him. Solution to his trouble is quite simple - restore him to his parish and secure his brother in his, and he 'will guarantee that everything will go on smoothly'.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

17 November 1892 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rome to Kirby: Writer regrets he sees no satisfactory settlement to his case. Goes into great detail as to his course of action for future.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

31 December 1894 Holograph letter from Rev. P. A. Treacy, Philadelphia to Kirby: It has been arranged that writer may say Mass at the hospital of St. Agnes, from whence he writes, until such time as he obtains 'an active position in the ministry'. New Bishop of Trenton, Dr. McFaul, with whom he has had several 'amicable personal interviews' is to pay his board. Enclosing copies of letters to him from Mgr. Satolli, Apostolic Delegate, and from Rev. J. F. Loughlin, Chancellor. Letter concludes by asking Kirby's blessing and gives the news of his brother, Rev. William Treacy, having been appointed a curate by Dr. McFaul.

The Kirby Collection Catalogue Irish College Rome

 

 

 

 

 

The New York Times – Selected Headlines

http://query.nytimes.com/search/query?srchst=p

 

February 5, 1893

ANOTHER DECISION BY MGR. SATOLLI.

 

March 6, 1893

PRIESTS UNDER THE BAN.; TWO BROTHERS RESISTING THE AU- THORITY OF BISHOP O'FARRELL.

 

March 8, 1893

The Treacys Are Excommunicated.

 

March 13, 1893

EXCOMMUNICATED BY SATOLLI.; FATHER TREACY TAKES HALF HIS CONGREGATION WITH HIM.

 

March 14, 1893

FATHER TREACY MUST GO; THE SHERIFF IS WARNED OF APPROACHING TROUBLE. FATHER LEAHY SAYS HIS PEOPLE CONTEMPLATE TAKING THE CHURCH PROPERTY BY FORCE -- FATHER TREACY SAYS NOTHING WOULD TEMPT HIM TO YIELD.

 

March 14, 1893

MGR. SATOLLI AND THE POPE.

 

March 16, 1893

MAY HAVE A RIOT SUNDAY.; THE CHURCH TROUBLE AT SWEDESBOROUGH STILL UNSETTLED.

 

March 19, 1893, Wednesday

The Rival Priests of Swedesborough.

 

March 20, 1893

WARRING CHURCH FACTIONS.; CATHOLICS OF SWEDES BOROUGH, N.J., HOLD SERVICES IN PARLORS.

 

March 30, 1893

A CATHOLIC CHURCH WAR OVER.; FATHER LEAHY WINS AND FATHER TREACY IS ENJOINED.

 

April 17, 1893

FATHER TREACY ALARMED.; A Demonstration by the Followers of Father Leahy.

 

April 19, 1893

SATOLLI MUST SHOW AUTHORITY.; The Swedesborough Church Case Will Rest Until He Does It.

 

April 20, 1893

MGR. SATOLLIS POWERS.

 

April 28, 1893

SATOLLIS POWER SUPREME.; No Appeal from His Decisions Will Be Entertained by the Pope.

 

May 3, 1893

NOT YET RID OF FATHER TREACY.; Decision for Him in the Swedesborough Church Case -- Satolli's Power.

 

 

Catholic Church of the Diocese of Trenton, N.J. collected and compiled by Walter T. Leahy. (1906)

In 1873, Rev. Patrick A. Treacy succeeded to this charge, and he enlarged the church and became first resident pastor of Oxford. Father Treacy remained in charge till 1885...

The second pastor of St. Joseph's was the Rev. Patrick Treacy, who remained at Washington till 1882, during which time he opened a day-school for the parish children. In 1882 Father Treacy, preferring the town of Oxford, took up his residence there, thus making Washington a Mission Church, much to the dissatisfaction of the people and the detriment of religion...

The next incumbent of this parish was the Rev. Patrick A. Treacy, who came from the Oxford Parish. He took charge in February, 1885, and for a time was very pleasing to the people, but about 1890 it was noticed that his mind was beginning to weaken, and, as time advanced, the malady increased. Finally, in 1892, at the request of the people, Bishop O'Farrell was obliged to remove him from his charge. This removal he resisted until the medical and civil authorities enforced his departure, but not till much annoyance had been caused the Bishop and his friends trouble. After-events proved the Bishop was right. He retired to Mt. Hope Retreat, Baltimore, where he resides under the kindly care of the Sisters of Charity...

For several years Father Treacy led a quiet and studious life, but in 1892 the trouble which broke out in Burlington spread to this quiet little town, for when Bishop O'Farrell decided to remove Father Patrick Treacy from his charge at Burlington, Father William, his brother, took up the case against the Bishop. Then, with the advice of a third brother, Mr. James Treacy, and some hot-headed followers, began a series of incidents that were very annoying to all good Catholics. William was placed under cen'sure by his Bishop. He then appealed his case to Rome. It was referred back to the Apostolic Delegate and decided against him. On February 28, 1892, he was deposed from his charge, and Father Leahy, curate at Perth Amboy, was sent to succeed him, but Father Treacy refused to yield. Then ensued a controversy which continued for three months, during which time the congregation was divided into two factions. Further appeals were made to Rome ; the case went to the Court of Chancery; the rebellious pastor and his supporters were excommunicated and life was made miserable for all concerned. Finally the case was settled, and after all court expenses were paid, Father Treacy retired to private life until such time as the Bishop restored him to a charge. This case gained a great deal of notoriety, and drew forth a vast amount of useless criticism, but it also ended in loss to Father Treacy. Again, after-events proved the Bishop was right...

...1894, who in turn was succeeded by Rev. William P. Treacy. Father Treacy remained in charge till the Fall of 1905, when he was transferred to Millstone...

REV. WILLIAM P. TREACY.

Rev. William P. Treacy was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, November 21, 1850. He studied at Woodstock, Md., and Louvain, Belgium, for the Society of Jesus, and was ordained a priest of that Society, September 8, 1880. October 28, 1886, he was received into the Diocese of Trenton and given charge of Swedesboro. He was removed from that parish, February 28, 1893, by Bishop O'Farrell and after an absence of nearly two years from the Diocese, was appointed assistant to Father John Brady, of South Amboy by Bishop McFaul. He was afterwards pastor of Bradevelt and East Millstone, and died at the last named place, March 29, 1906.

(Leahy)

 

 

 

Donahoe's Magazine

 

Donahoe’s Magazine, Vol. Vi. July, 1880, To January, 1881.

 

Historical and Biographical Stories, Sketches, Ankcdotes, etc. Compiled by James J. Treacy. Large lGmo, cloth, bright colors, gold and ink designs, 350 pages, $1.00.

This makes a very beautiful and attractive volume. Being very interesting and Catholic In tone, it is one of the very best books for premiums.

The above books can be had of Messrs.Noonan & Co., office of Donahoe's Magazine

 

Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 13-4, 1885  

 

OUR Most Holy Father, Pope Leo Xlll., has been graciously pleased to impart his Apostolic Benediction, for the second time, to Mr. James J. Treacy, author of “ Tributes of Protestant

Writers to the Truth and Beauty of Catholicity,” and to signify his high appreciation of “Tributes” and of “Catholic Flowers from Protestant Gardens.” His Holiness has also deigned to honor Mr. Treacy with the present of an exquisite  executed cameo, representing St. Joseph and the Infant Saviour, the work of a distinguished Roman artist. 

 

CATHOLIC HISTORY OF MARYLAND

We know very many of our readers will be glad to learn that a work relative to the early missionaries of Maryland, to contain about two hundred pages, has been written by the Rev. William P. Treacy, S. J., and will soon be published. The learned author has been engaged for some time in examining the old documents in the Jesuit archives at Woodstock and other original sources of Catholic history. The coming work has been declared by competent judges who have examined it as a remarkable attempt at investigating the true sources of early Catholic history in the United States, as a work of great re- search, and of wide importance for the light it throws upon the history of the Church during-Colonial times. 

 

TRIBUTES or Protestant Writers to the  Truth and Beauty of Catholicity by james J. Treacy, author of " Catholic Flowers from Protestant Gardens," etc. Magna est veritas et prevalebit. Price $1,25

This is a most valuable collection of extracts from the writings of eminent Protestant authors. Among them Sir James Stephen, Archbishop Trench, Bishop Wordsworth, J. von Muller, Rev. J. M. Neale, Sir Francis Palgrave, Charles Phillips, William H. Prescott, John Ruskin, H. W. Longfellow, Lord Macaulay, Sir James McIntosh, William Cobbett, Henry Giles, James Anthon Froude, Grotius Hugo, Sir Archibald Allison, Lord Brougham, Edmund Burke, Thomas Carlyle, and a host of others, the whole forming a book of four hundred pages. From these selections, Protestants are forced to admit the truths of Catholicity.

 

A Learned Priest.

Rev. Patrick Aloysius Treacy, the new pastor of St. Paul's Church, Burlington, N. J., was born at Carrick-on-Suir, Ireland, in 1843. He was educated at a private school (at the select school of the Christian Brothers), and at the Classical Academy of his native town. He received his theological training in the Ecclesiastical Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, Philadelphia, and was ordained priest at the age of twenty-three. From 1866 to 1868 he was attached to St. Michael's Church, Philadelphia, where he endeared himself to the people by his attention to the cholera patients, and his zeal for the Christian education of the young. As curate to Vicar-General Walsh, of Philadelphia; to the venerable Father Maher, of Norristown, and t0 the learned and venerable Father Cauvin, of Hoboken, Father Treacy has had the best opportunities of learning his duties from distinguished pastors, who were trained in their professional functions in the great cities of New York and Philadelphia. Among his Professors in the faculties of theology and philosophy Father Treacy can name Bishops O'Hara, of Scranton, and O'Connor, of Omaha, the celebrated divine, Rev. Dr. Balfe, and Rev. Dr. Keogh, whose magnificent display at the examination in Rome won the admiration of the Pope himself. To indicate how high Father Treacy stood in the Seminary for talent and literary ability, it is only necessary to state that he was selected by Dr. Keogh to write the Theological Essay, and that the whole staff of Professors came specially to hear Father Treacy read it, and that he was called upon to read it over again, when Archbishop Wood was present at the annual examination. Father Treacy is an ardent Irish patriot. He advocates home Rule for Ireland, and even further, the total separation of Ireland from England. In the words of Henry Grattan, “ He will not be satisfied so long as the humble cottager in Ireland has a link of the British chain clanking to him.”  

Allusion has been made in previous issues to Father Treacy’s labors as pastor of Washington, Oxford, and Belvidere, N. J. Oxford has become closely associated with his name in his literary, philosophical and poetical contributions to DONAHOE'S MAGAZINE and other periodicals. 

Father P. A. Treacy is the elder brother of Mr. James J. Treacy, who has been lately honored by our Holy Father Pope Leo XIII. with the Apostolic Benediction for the second time, and with the present of a magnificent cameo executed by one of the most distinguished Roman artists, in testimony of His Holiness’ high and generous appreciation of Mr. Treacy's recent work,— "Tributes of Protestant Writers to the Truth and Beauty of Catholicity,” which the most Holy Father graciously deigned to examine with deep interest; and also, of an earlier compilation of Mr. Treacy's “Catholic Flowers from Protestant Gardens." 

The third and youngest of this trio of literary brothers, Father William P. Treacy, S. J., pastor at Woodstock College, Maryland, was ordained in Louvain, Belgium. He is the author of the celebrated poetic “Lines to Rev. A. J. Ryan," and of a series of most interesting and patriotic, historical articles on “Irish Students in Continental Universities." While staying at Louvain, he availed himself of the opportunity to examine the original documents relating to the illustrious Irish ecclesiastics and soldiers, who, having been driven by British oppression from their native land, had won merited fame in the universities, courts and camps of Continental Europe. 

Father W. P. Treacy is now engaged in preparing his “ History of the Early Jesuit Missions" for publication. One of his articles on that subject will soon appear in the Catholic World, and another in the American Catholic Quarterly Review.  

 

 

Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 19, 1888

The Rev. William P. Treacy, author of Irish Scholars highly honored.

In a recent letter to the Rev. P. A. Treacy, pastor of Burlington, N. J., the venerable and learned Archbishop Tobias Kirby writes: -— “My dear Father Treacy: Your esteemed letter accompanied by the beautiful work on IRISH SCHOLARS, has come to hand. I thank you and your Rev. Brother for so valuable and useful a gift. It is full of most important and interesting information and reflects the highest credit on the mind and true Irish Catholic heart of the gifted author to whom I beg of you to present my sincere and grateful acknowledgments." The Rev. Charles P. Meehan, the distinguished Member of the Royal Irish Academy, has just written to the author:—“ My dear Rev. Friend; I have gone through a good portion of your work; and every page, prose and verse, charmed me more than I can tell you. God grant you many years to adorn the priesthood of Ireland and America." Aubrey De Vere*, an able historical scholar, and one of the most classic poets of this century, thus writes to Father Treacy :- "I heartily congratulate you on having turned to such good account the opportunities presented to you by your residence at many of the places you have so well illustrated, and think that you have conferred a great benefit on our fellow-countrymen both in Ireland and in America. I earnestly hope that they will turn their attention more and more to such subjects ——I was much struck by the beauty and pathos of many of your poems. I forwarded to you yesterday a volume by my father‘ Mary Tudor. I have also to ask your acceptance of my latest volume of Poetry, Legends and Records of the Church and the Empire, which my publisher will send you." The Dublin Nation, edited by the charming “National Bard of Ireland," Lord Mayor Sullivan, devotes two entire columns to a highly appreciative review of Irish Scholars. Among other things it says that “it recalls the days when Thomas Davis, and his fellow-workers were rousing a slumbering nation to the knowledge of the heritage of the history of its sons," etc., etc.

*‘Sir Aubrey De Vere, who was pronounced by Wordsworth to be the most perfect sonncter of the age.

 

Donahoe's Magazine, Volume 23, 1890

The John Gilmary Shea Testimonial Fund.

[organised by] Rev. P. A. Treacy, Rector St. Paul’s Church, Burlington, New Jersey.

Rev. P. A. Treacy, Burlington, New Jersey, . . . . . . $50.

Rev. William P. Treacy, Swedesboro, New Jersey, . . . . . $50.

Mr. James J. Treacy, Philadelphia, . . . . . $25.

 

 

 

The Monks of Erin. by Rev. William P. Treacy. S.J.

 

The Irish monks, the Irish monks, their names are treasured still

In many a foreign valley, on many a foreign hill,

Their preaching, prayers, and fasting are still the peasants' themes

Around the coast of Cornwall, and along old Flanders' streams;

Their lives austere and holy, and the wonders of their hands,

Still nourish faith and sanctity through fair Italia's lands,

The cross they bore in triumph, oh, bright as e'er it shines

Above the domes of Austria, among the Tuscan vines.

 

Sedulius the poet, and Columbkille the dove,

At Rome and Hy are honoured, and remembered still with love;

At Lucca, St Frigidian, in a church ablaze with lights,

Is honoured with pure worship, 'mid the pomp of Roman rites.

Even still the British miners exult on Piran's feast,

And though they hate the Church of Rome, they venerate her priest.

The bells of sweet Tarentum, as they wake the matin air,

Still tell in tones of gladness that Cataldus' faith is there.

 

Quaint Mechlin's noblest temple to an Irish monk is raised,

In every home in Mechlin St. Rumold's name is praised;

Virgilius, the gifted, in his glorious Saltzburg tomb,

Is honoured by the silent prayer and by the cannou's boom,

Old hymns are sung to Fridolin in the islands of the Rhine,

And the relics of Besanvon's saint sleep in a silver shrine;

The voice that roused Crusaders by the Tagus, Ithone, and Po,

Seems ringing still o'er Mlalachy at the convent of Clairvaux.

 

The Irish monks, the Irish monks, their spirit still survives

In the stainless Church of Ireland, and in her priesthood's lives.

Their spirit still doth linger round Holycross and Kells,

Oh, Ireland's monks can know no death while gush our holy wells.

High Cashel's fane is standing, and though in the spoiler's hand

Like the captive ark of Judah, 'tis a blessing to our land,

For proudly it reminds us of the palmy days of yore

When kings were monks, and monks were kings, upon our Irish shore.

 

Ref:

William P. Treacy. The Monks of Erin. The Irish Monthly, Vol. 12, No. 131 (May, 1884), p. 244 (Irish Jesuit Province)

April 28, 1888 The Irish standard (Minneapolis, Minn.)

 

 

ERIN

Apart she stands from all the world,

The Diadem of Isles;

Her-wooded hills like flags unfurled,

Wave o'er her deep defiles;

Her castles—aged a thousand years—

Her towers, as old as they,

Seem fresher grown from her sad tears,

And know not of decay.

 

The sea-birds seek her rocky cliffs,

The eagle seeks her sky,

The gallant ships, and painsed skiffs

Within her havens lie;

Her Torrents leap in silver showers,

in silver fall her rains,

The Shamrock, intertwined with flowers,

Lie sleeping on her plains.

 

The red deer 'mid her crags leap free,

The lark's song stirs her air,

Her thrushes squander melody

Around them everywhere;

There's music in her abbey-bells,

And in her sparkling rills,

There's beauty in her tuneful dells—,

And grandeur on her hills.

 

Her ruins old, with glories shine,

With glories like the morn's

There's glory On her cross divine,

And round her crown of thorns;

There's glory round her peasant homes.

Or where those homes have been,

There's glory on her shining domes—

Such glory ne'er was seen.

 

Unchained to any vulgar land,

Our Isle glows in the West,

While winds and waves sleep on her strand,

And in her caves find rest

But we, poor exiles, far away,

Sad pilgrims through the world,

Can only wait, and watch, and pray

'Till her loved Flag's unfurled.

 

But when that day upon as breaks,

Like glory from the skies

When Freedom from her sleep awakes

Anil—"Death or Freedom."—cries.

Then like the dead from out their graves,

Like lightning from the cloud,

We'll fill I dark ships, we'll plough green waves

And round our Nation crowd.

 

We'll kiss her strand with burning love,

We'll bless her o'er and o'er.

We'll grasp her Flag that floats above,

And wave it o'er her shore

We'll sing Te Deums on her strand

'Till all the world will see,

And all men know that our green land—

Thank God!—Is Free! Is Free!

 

—Rev. William P. Treacy.

               May 26, 1888 The Irish standard (Minneapolis, Minn.) & Donahoe's magazine. v.19 (1888).

 

The Gaelic Tongue by Rev WP Treacy

 

Oh! What scenes of joy and sorrow does the Gaelic Tongue unfold!

Deed of heroes, deeds of martyrs, in that grand old tongue are told,

Deeds that set priest-poets dreaming, deeds o’er which gray soldiers wept,

Deeds that set each young hear throbbing in that old tongue long have slept;

Ancient churches, abbeys hoary, seem as if they just had sprung

As was had there consecration in that ornate Gaelic tongue

All the stars of far off ages full of lustre seem to glow,

As we hear that voice of music, the sweet tongue of long ago.

‘Twas the tongue of Dathi’s warriors as they slumbered round the camp fires,

‘Twas the toungue of Tara’s minstrels as they touched their sounding lyres!

‘Twas the mystic tongue of Druids in the solemn world and dim

‘Twas the holy tongue of vestals when uprose their morning hymn!

‘Twas the lofty Tongue of Ard Righs ‘mid the Councils of the great!

‘Twas the cultured Tongue of Brehons as they penned the laws of State!

‘Twas the trumpet ere the battle, ‘twas the thunder ‘mid the fray –

‘Twas the terror of the foemen with its war-cry, clear the way!

‘Twas the gleesome song of triumph, ‘twas the weird and piercing wail,

‘Twas the dirge of flowing sorrow, for the dead among the Gael!

‘Twas the soft sweet strain of maidens as the stars peeped through the skies!

‘Twas the lullaby of mothers as their darlings closed their eyes!

‘Twas the voice of monks and hermits in fair Erin’s lone detiles!

‘Twas the Tongue of St. Columba as he coasted Scotia’s isles!

‘Twas the Tongue of royal Cormac as his deeds he used to tell!

‘Twas the Tongue of fearless Brendan ‘mid the wild Atlantic swell!

‘Twas the bold tongue of our Fathers when our own green Isle was free!

‘Tis the Tongue of native Freedom, ‘tis the tongue of chivalry

‘Tis a Tongue of sacred memories, ‘tis our golden tongue of yore –

‘Tis that music tongue should flourish round old Erin’s sea-girt shore!

While the Bandon (?) rolls on nobly, and the proud Owen (?) lifts its head,

While we fell our grandaires’ spirit, while we venerate our dead,

While our Irish hearts are beating, while a noble deed is sung

We will never let it perish, we will love that Gaelic Tongue!

 We will gather up the fragments, with a tender loving care

As we find them in dim records, or illumed in books of prayer,

As we find them in each story of our country’s centuried wrong,

As we find them gently flowing on the gleaming tide of song –

As we find them as a treasure that has come down from the past,

We shall keep them as a blessing while our strength and life shall last.

When the proud songs of liberty our Island home shall sing.

Oh! ‘tis then e’en more than ever to our Gaelic Tongue we’ll cling.

 

               Oct 3, 1896 Front Page, Southern Star, Cork

 

 

 

 

Last update: 19 February 2018