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Frank Tracy (1943-) of the Liberties and Stillorgan Dublin

 

Travelling to the parish of Killakee, in the Dublin Mountains, historian Frank Tracy toured the grounds of the Massy Estate for this recording, beginning at the beehive cottage. Lord Massy and his wife spent 35 years living here. Frank outlined the genealogy of the family and walked through the now wooded area to where the original grand house stood. He continued on to the walled garden area where he compared some 19th century photographs with its mostly wooded landscape today.

https://www.irishlifeandlore.com/product/frank-tracy-age-65-stillorgan/

 

 

 

 

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Pádraig Treacy (1953-) of Killarney, Co. Kerry

 

Track 1: Pádraig Treacy recalls his grandfather who served in the RIC and who arrived in Killarney in 1909. He later worked as gatekeeper for Lord Kenmare. Pádraig’s father, Marcus, was a teacher in the Killarney area, and his mother, Marie O’Sullivan, came to Killarney to work at the Ross Hotel, owned by her aunt, Julia O’Donoghue. The premises was then known as the Kenmare Arms Hotel, and it was bequeathed to Marie O’Sullivan during the years of WWII.

Track 2: Pádraig discusses his childhood at the Ross Hotel, his education and his work experience for five years in car sales at Jimmy The Master’s garage. With his wife Janet, he then set to work to build up business at the Ross Hotel in the 1970s and 1980s.

Track 3: He recalls their plans for expansion which involved purchasing land at Fossa, and the eventual building of the Park Hotel in the field adjoining Cooper’s Cinema in 1989. His dealings with the UDC, in particular with Town Manager Paddy d’Arcy, and the support given to him to enable him to build the hotel, are described.

Track 4: The opening of the hotel, designed by architect Roddy Horgan, in 1992 and the huge task which lay ahead at that time are recalled.

Track 5: Pádraig discusses his decision to create a contemporary rather than a more traditional style of building at that time, and he also recalls the work of County Engineer, Colm Kennelly.

Track 6: The positive relationship which exists between the members of the Town Council, the business people and the community groups in Killarney is emphasised.

https://www.irishlifeandlore.com/product/p%C3%A1draig-treacy-b-1953/

 

 

 

 

 

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Sarah Tracey née Slattery, born 1916 Ballymore Co. Kildare

 

Irish Life and Lore Kildare Collection, CD 26

 Memories of Ballymore Eustace

Recorded by: Maurice O’Keeffe

Date: 2009

Time: 70:28

Description: The Slattery family came from Harristown and Sarah Tracey’s grandfather was First Huntsman to Lord la Touche in Harristown House. Sarah has clear memories of her early days in Ballymore Eustace, the forge, the local bar and groceries, drapers, the post office and the thatched houses. She recounts the names of all the family owned businesses in the town. She recalls the activities of the Black and Tans in her native area, and also her own early days in employment as housekeeper for a Jewish family in Dublin. She remembers the advent of the creameries around the countryside, and the employment provided by the big estates. Sarah’s mother came originally from Carrigmacross and she brought with her the tradition of lace work, and sold her craftwork to the local people.

www.irishlifeandlore.com

 

 

 

 

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Willie Treacy (1929-2017) of Shortstone Co. Louth

 

GAA Oral History

William Treacy recalls starting up his local GAA club in Louth, Roche Emmets. A group of locals used to play football together but they knew nothing about the rules or how to organise themselves. Eventually some experienced people came in and helped them start the club. They soon secured a field to play on and some goalposts, and they were on their way. William played for some years but an injury meant that he had to stop playing. He remained involved and helped to raise funds, contributed in an administrative capacity, and compiled a history of the club with two others. He recounts stories of his youth detailing the fun that they had, the trouble they got into and the great games that they witnessed.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/oral-history/willie-treacy/

 

 

 

 

 

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Jim Treacy (1915-) of Shinrone, Co. Offaly/Tipperary

 

Parishes of Shinrone and Ballingarry

Recorded by: Noel MacMahon

Recording date: 

Length: 45:22

Irish Life and Lore Series - Offaly Collection

Jim Treacy was born on the 27th July 1915. He was a member of the farming community and was involved in all the farming activities in his local area. He was a founder member of Ballingarry I.F.A in the early sixties. Jim was a keen GAA player and follower. He was a member of Knockshegowna GAA club which he founded with locals in 1934, and with whom he had the honour of winning the North Tipperary Junior Championship in the same year. As it was Silver Jubilee year victory was very sweet. He was a selector in 1965 when Knockshegowna won the North Tipperary Under 15 Juvenile Championship. Two of his sons played on the team. Jim played an active part in securing free transport to Borrisokane Community College in the early seventies. He died on the 14th October 2000.

www.irishlifeandlore.com

 

 

 

 

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The Famine in Toomevara, Co Tipperary by Helen O Brien Malone

 

In November 2010 another excellent publication in the Maynooth Local History Studies was published by Four Courts Press. At no. 89 in this series ‘The Famine clearance in Toomevara, County Tipperary’ by Helen O’Brien (ISBN: 978-84682-2605 : 64pp : Price €9.95)

 

…The author was very fortunate to have access to the manuscript memoirs of Thomas Tracey, a local schoolmaster, who was born in Toomevara in 1832….

Ireland’s Genealogical Gazette, May 2011

 

Oct 10, 1923 (IT)

The death has taken place of Mr. Thomas Treacy, formerly a National school teacher, of Toomevara, Co. Tipperary, at the age of 92.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xhC7yF2WTs&t=102s

 

 

 

 

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Jimmy Treacy (1940-) of Omagh, Co. Tyrone

 

GAA Oral History

Jimmy Treacy and Pat McCartan begin with discussing the GAA of their childhood and the impact it had on their local community when they were growing up. They discuss how influential priests were in the area in mobilising support for the GAA. Jimmy provides an account of the GAA overseas as he lived in England and America for a number of years. Both Pat and Jimmy discuss their involvement with the West Tyrone Board and their experiences as officials at county level. Jimmy and Pat give a detailed account of the challenges the GAA faced in Tyrone during the Troubles in North of Ireland and discuss some of their experiences during this time.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/oral-history/jimmy-treacy-and-pat-mccartan/

Jimmy discusses the impact that the Hunger Strikes had on the GAA in Tyrone during the Troubles.

https://www.bc.edu/centers/irish/gaahistory/Previous_Themes/CountyByCounty/Tyrone.html

 

 

 

 

 

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John Tracey, Greencastle, Co. Tyrone

 

Francis McGowan and John Tracey recollect their experiences of their time spent imprisoned in the late 1970's and early 1980s including their recollections of the 1981 Hunger Strike in Long Kesh.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_nmejJp_fI

 

 

 

 

 

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Willie (Bill) Treacy (1925-2014) of Leegane Wexford and London England

 

GAA Oral History

Bill Treacy describes where he grew up in Wexford, before discussing the history of Gaelic games in the area. He then recalls his family's involvement in Gaelic games. Bill recalls stories he has heard regarding The Troubles in the area during the 1920s, before talking about the GAA in his school days. He remembers his GAA heroes of the past from Wexford teams. He describes travelling to matches in his younger days, and also lists the venues he played in during his playing career. Bill talks about what makes the GAA special, explaining what the Association means to him. He also discusses what drives teams in the North of Ireland on. He recalls his time in the Army and some of the places he played. He describes the regime of Army life and the influence it had on him. Bill discusses emigrating to London. He recalls his introduction to the GAA in London. He discusses the clubs he joined, the roles he undertook and the influence and role that the GAA plays in the lives of the Irish abroad. He concludes by saying what his proudest moment in the GAA is, and reveals how he would like to be remembered by the London GAA community.

https://www.gaa.ie/the-gaa/oral-history/bill-treacy/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last update: 22 February 2019