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 Daniel Tracey and family (Roscrea, Montreal and Albany)

 

 

1.      Daniel Tracey (c1795-1832), physician, journalist and politician.

 

The details of his life in Ireland are sketchy. According to Mullally, the following account was printed in The Vindicator in 1833 after his death. He was born in Roscrea, Co. Tipperary, in May, 1795, the son of Michael Tracey, a merchant and ??? Mainfold of Erescourt, Birr Co. Offaly. He was orphaned at a young age and an uncle on his father’s side raised him and a brother and sister. At the age of ten he was removed from a seminary in his native town to a school in Clonmel. He was educated at Trinity College, Dublin, and after graduation studied medicine at the Royal College of Surgeons, Dublin. He practised medi­cine in Dublin for several years; but in 1825 he emigrated to Canada with his brother and sister. According to Reynolds, Dr. Daniel Tracey (who changed the spelling of the name) was of an Irish branch of the well-known English family, and by much the eldest of four orphaned children, a graduate of Trinity College and of its medical school, he was a practicing physician residing in Offaly county, Ireland, when the accidental death by drowning of a younger brother, to whom he was fondly attached, led him to decide on a change of residence to Canada. After a shipwreck in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, he arrived in Montreal in the year 1825, having with him his brother, John, then a lad of fourteen years, and his sister, Ann, aged fifteen. The Trinity College record is as follows: Daniel Tracey, Pen. (Mr Morris), Dec 5, 1814, aged 20; R.C., s. of Denis, Mercator; b. King’s Co. (Offaly). A French reference states that his father was Denys (Denis) Tracey a merchant of Offaly and his mother Anne Manford.

 

His life in Canada is well documented. He began the practise of his profession in Montreal in 1825 and lived in either on St. James Street or in the then St. Antoine Suburbs. In 1828 he established the Vindicator, a Reform newspaper, and became its editor. When news of O’Connell's electoral victory arrived in Lower Canada in September 1828 Tracey organized the province’s first Friends of Ireland Society. In May 1832, he was elected to represent the west ward of Montreal in the Legislative Assembly of Lower Canada. He died of cholera in Montreal on July 18, 1832, after tending the sick Irish immigrants who had fled the scourges of famine, disease, and impoverishment in Ireland only to contract cholera on board ship.

 

When the Côte des Neiges Cemetery was opened in 1855 his body was reinterred there, and in 1866 his brother John Tracey, who had left Montreal about the time of the outbreak of the rebellion of 1837 and settled in Albany, New York, erected a large monument, at a reputed cost of 10,000 dollars (£2,000 sterling), over the grave which contains the following inscription in English and French:

 

 "Here repose the remains of the late Daniel Tracey, M.D., who died of cholera, 19th July, 1832. He was a native of Roscrea County, Tipperary, Ireland, and a graduate of Trinity College, Dublin. His career in Canada was distinguished by devotion to the liberties of the country which he ably and fearlessly advocated in The Vindicator newspaper, established by him in 1828 and of which journal he continued editor to the time of his death. By order of the Legislative Council he was imprisoned ten days in Quebec for alleged disrespect to that body, contained in an editorial article. On his liberation he was received in triumph by the people of Montreal on the 5th of March, and they further testified their gratitude by electing him member of parliament for the West ward of the city the 21st May following 1832. As a public journalist and devoted patriot his memory will ever be venerated by his fellow citizens, three of whom sealed with their blood on the eve of his election the trust reposed in his integrity.

 

“This monument was erected to Dr. Tracey A.D. 1866 by his brother John Tracey of Albany, New York, to replace one erected in 1832 by his personal friends Sir Louis H. Lafontaine, Doctor Vallee and Ovide Perrault."

 

Riot at Montreal New York Spectator 1832

 

Ref:

Browne, P.W. (1933) Some Irish Leaders in Canada. An Irish Quarterly Review, Vol. 22, No. 86 (Jun., 1933), pp. 245-256

Finnegan, Mary (1985) Irish-French Relations in Lower Canada. CCHA Historical Studies, 52, 35-49

Galarneau, France, L'élection dans le quartier-ouest de Montréal en 1832: analyse politico-sociale, RHAF, vol.32 (1978-1979), 4 :565-584.;

Galarneau, France, Tracey, Daniel, DBC, PUL, 1966, vol.6: 864-865.; Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online http://www.biographi.ca/009004-119.01-e.php?&id_nbr=3175&interval=20&&PHPSESSID=1uh41v2msq1s5f7jhb1ru2g3b3

Lacoursière, Jacques (1996) Histoire populaire du Québec, tome 2, de 1791 à 1841, Montréal, Septentrion, p.446

Lapalice, Ovide (1927) Le docteur Daniel Tracey, Bulletin des recherches historique, 33: 492-493.;

Mullally, Emmet J. (1934-5) “Dr. Daniel Tracey – A Pioneer Worker for Responsible Government in Canada,” CCHA Report,.

Reynolds, Cuyler ed. (1911) Hudson-Mohaw Genealogical and Family Memoirs. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Vol. I pp.255-7

Slattery. Maureen (1997) Irish Radicalism and the Roman Catholic Church in Quebec and Ireland, 1833-1834: O'Callaghan and O'Connell Compared CCHA, Historical Studies, 63 (1997), 29-58 http://www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/ccha/Back%20Issues/CCHA1997/Slattery.pdf

Art-News from Canada. The Art Journal (1866) London: Virtue & Co.

 

Daniel_Tracey_Pierre_tombale.JPG

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Daniel_Tracey_Pierre_tombale.JPG

 

The Daniel Tracey monument. This is a monumental quadrangular bell-turret, of large and rich design. At each angle are pilasters, with coniform apex and with nerves, the whole being most ornamental and very elegant.

Mondou, Siméon (1887) The first Catholic cemeteries of Montreal and a guide to the present cemetery.

 

 

August 22, 1832 Connaught Telegraph (Mayo)

Canada. We have received Montreal Papers to the 13th July. The Cholera was diminishing in tbe number of cases but the mortality was greater in proportion. Mr Tracey, the. Editor of the Vindicator, was amoung the deaths by the disease. From Upper and Lower Canada the reports were favourable.

 

2.      Ann Tracey

 

Ann Tracey (c1807-11th February 1879) the sister of Dr. Daniel Tracey, married Charles Wilson (1808-1877) on the 19th May 1835, who was to serve as a representative from 1848 on, mayor of Montreal (1851- 1854), a senator (1867-death) and a knight commander of the Order of St. Gregory by Pope Pius IX (1855).

 

3.      John Tracey

 

John Tracey (c1809- 1875), the brother of Dr. Daniel Tracey, was born in Frankford, County Kings [Offaly], Ireland, on the 8th of December, 1809, and died July 12, 1875. He came to America when he was fourteen or sixteen years old. The different accounts of his early life seem to agree on the detail but not the sequence of events. He may have been to the United States and later in Canada. The accounts state that he left Canada at the beginning of the rebellion in 1837. . At some stage before or after his exit from Canada he travelled to New Orleans to work but the climate did not suit him. He finally settled in Albany in 1837 or 1839. In 1848, he was a member of the executive committee of the Association of the Friends of Ireland. He was a member of the Democratic Party, a friend of Governor Seymour and other public men of his day, receiving and entertaining them socially at his home. His residence in Albany for twenty-four years was the old Schuyler Mansion, in which he had a life tenancy during the lifetime of Mrs. Millard Fillmore, widow of President Fillmore. At the start of the civil war, he was a member of the Common Council and on the finance committee. He held the office of police commissioner, at the organization of its present system. He served as alderman from the old First ward; member of the board of police commissioners and of the board of education; in 1872 was defeated by a narrow majority as a candidate for the state senate; was a trustee of the Albany Savings Bank, was a member of the board of trade. He was a Catholic in religion, and deeply interested in the welfare of his church and the various charities under her control. He was trustee of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, St. Agnes Cemetery (Trustee 1867-1875), St. Vincent's Orphan Asylum and a governor of Albany City Hospital. He married, in Canada, Maria McCarthy, daughter of a retired English army officer, Lieutenant Charles McCarthy, a soldier under Wellington, debarred from higher rank through his religion and refusal to take the oath of abjuration. John Tracey died July 12, 1875. Maria McCarthy Tracey, born in the Isle of Wight in 1812, died February 5, 1880. There were nine children of this marriage, four only of whom survived infancy.

 

17 July 1867 (FJ)

The following are amongst the latest arrivals at the Shelbourne Hotel [Dublin]...John Tracey, Albany, New York; Mrs and Miss Tracey, do; Charles Tracy, do; Master Tracey, do;...

31 July 1867 (FJ)

The following are amongst the latest arrivals at the Imperial Hotel, Belfast...Mr Tracey and family (5), USA...

 

 

21 August 1875 (N) NY Death

The New York Freeman's Journal announces the death of Mr. John Tracey, a prominent citizen of Albany, N.Y., who died in that city on Monday, July 12, in the 66th year of his age, and was born in Frankfort, King's County, on the 8th of December 1809. Mr. Tracey leaves a widow and three sons, one of whom is Chevalier Tracey, of the Pontitical Zouaves. The funeral took place from St. Anne's Church, of which Mr. Tracey was the founder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Tracey Memorial - St. Agnes Cemetery

This beautiful memorial, erected to the memory of the late John Tracey, is one of the most imposing in the Cemetery. In design it consists of a white marble shaft, on which rests a graceful cross, the whole towering above the surrounding foliage. The plot is situated in one of the most picturesque parts of the Cemetery, both by reason of the natural beauty as well as the careful cultivation tendered by those who keep in loving memory those dear ones who have gone "to that bourne from which no traveler returns." From here one can obtain a view of the surrounding country, unsurpassed in any other part of the grounds.

 

 

 

 

3.1 John Tracey (Colonel), (1843-1897) son of John Tracey, was born November 29, 1843. He was educated at George Wrightson's Academy and graduated at Mount Saint Mary's College, Emmettsburg, Maryland, where he took his A.B. He then travelled through Europe for a year. After a course at the Albany Law School was admitted to the bar and began practice in the office of Peter Cagger. After the breaking out of the civil war he entered the army as a lieutenant, and served on the staff of Brigadier-General Michael Corcoran, commander of the Irish brigade, seeing hard service in the Army of the Potomac and being mentioned in dispatches for conspicuous gallantry. He was mustered in as major of the Eighteenth Regiment, New York Light Cavalry, October 15, 1863; was commissioned lieutenant-colonel, December 28, 1864, with rank from November 25, 1864. He was mustered out June 12, 1865, at New Orleans, Louisiana, with the brevet rank of colonel, being then in command of his regiment. In 1867 Colonel Tracey married Katherine Clinton Vernam. About this time he became a member of a firm of distiller in Albany, when he gave it up to assume an editorial position on a New York Newspaper. They resided in the 1880 and 1892 Census at Long Island City Queens.

He was at one time very prominent in the local politics of New York city, and was well known as an advocate of the county Democracy as opposed to the old Tammany Society. He had filled various offices in the municipality or New York, at one time being a clerk of one of the courts, and was also a newspaper man or more than ordinary ability, having served as editor or the now defunct New York Star and other metropolitan newspapers. His experiences during political campaigns as the principal official in charge of Democratic headquarters brought him a widespread national acquaintanceship, and his genial manner and hearty friendship for nearly everyone who met him were marked characteristics. He was appointed superintendent of the Associated Charities in 1893, which was among the best appointments made in Mr Cleveland's second Administration.He died of Bright's disease at Providence Hospital Washington May 16, 1897. Their children were Minnie [Mary Spencer Tracey born born 1868 Albany], Ernest Clinton [born Charles Wilson Tracey born 1 Jun 1869 Manhattan, New York married Elizabeth Jones died Baltimore Maryland] and Katherine [Catherine Spencer Tracey born 25 Mar 1877 Manhattan, New York died 1943 buried Albany].

 

Ref:

17 May 1897 The Evening Times (NY)

18 May 1897 New York Times

 

 

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3.1.1 Minnie (Mary Spencer) Tracey (1868-1929)

 

Minnie Tracey, the dramatic soprano who was heard with so much pleasure last night as Leonora In "Trovatore" and whose Santuzza In "Cavelleria" and Nedda in "Pagliacci" will be heard to-night, has received rare endorsement for one of her years. She was born In Albany, N. Y., and is a niece of General Tracey. Miss Tracey was seen at the Denison House yesterday and related the story of her career.

 

"I always had the stage Idea." she said, "but my family opposed me. I was poohpoohed and silenced. My musical bent, however, they could not repress, and I was permitted to go to Paris to finish my vocal study. There, as an amateur, I studied with Marie Sass for two years and a half, a brilliant teacher, who had herself created the principal role in 'L'Africalne. By accident I was heard by Director Dauphin, of the Geneva Opera House, who offered me an engagement at once, but my teacher did not think at the first hearing that I was duly prepared. The director kept me in mind and the following spring asked me If I would sing before the abonnes of the Geneva opera, which I did. I made a success and was engaged at once. I made my debut in 'Faust.' my second appearance as Gllia in 'Rlgoletto’ and the third as Valentine In the 'Huguenots. I sang there for seven months and had the honor of singing Elsa for the first time in Franch in Geneva. I also sang there 'L’Africaine 'Alda Halevy's Mulve.' created 'Le Cid’, of Massenet: 'Iphlgenie. cf Gluck, and sang my French Elsa successfully about twenty-seven times.

 

"Following I sang in special performances all through Belgium. I put in no idle time. I assure you. I created the role of Brunnhilda. in Nice, the following winter.

 

"Dramatic, yes," said Miss Tracey, "that is my keynote in voice and action. In 1893 I sang at Covent Garden, London, my particular role being Donna Anna in 'Don Giovanni.' and then I had a host of social engagements which it grave me great enjoyment to fill. After London I went to Marseilles. I sang there twelve dramatic soprano roles and was unanimously received by the public and the extremely difficult, critical theatrical commission. Of course, you understand the very taxing mode there. You make three appearances. At the final one the director comes forward and demands In very plain terms from the public: 'Do you or do you not want her? There is no varnish on his question, any more than there is on the public reply, which, if they feel that way, will be a violent hissing for you just as soon as anything else. Well, they accepted me with cheers. Last winter I was leading prima donna in the opera house at Cairo, and much did I enjoy the Orient and Oriental appreciation and enthusiasm, which the Khedive heads so consistently. Incidentally I sang in Geneva, my pet corner of Europe by reason of my debut and the great success and encouragement obtained there. In Cairo I sang ia Cavalleria. 'PaJtllacci’ Bruneau's L'Attaque du Moulin.’ Delina’s great role and several others.

 

"Since my debut on the stage I have studied with Tequi, a great Paris teacher famous for diction and better known to the artistic and, professional than the average music loving world. How much I think of him and of the good he has accomplished for me I can hardly express. He Is a very great teacher.

 

The Magical Courier has the following complimentary words for Miss Tracey: "Miss Minnie Tracey has been rapidly winning in her own country, since her arrival, unstinted popularity and admiration. Small wonder is this to those who have followed the young singer's swift and sure artistic career in Europe. Three gifts belong to Miss Tracey Indisputably: A live, intelligent and extremely interesting personality; a full, rich, admirably trained voice and a dramatic power which distinguishes her on the operatic stage as an unusually capable and magnetic actress."

 

In 1915, due to the war in Europe, she planned an opening of an American Opera Comique on Broadway NY. She set up a new organization known as the French Opera Comique Company of America and was to leave for France to secure singers and rights to several productions. In October 1915 she became a staff member of the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. In 1917 she was a vice-president of the National Opera Club of America. She died 29 Jan 1929 in Cincinnati Ohio and was buried in Albany.

 

April 19, 1929 The Cincinnati Enquirer (Ohio)

Minnie S. Tracey's Will Filed. Under the will of Miss Minnie Spencer Tracey, widely known singer and music teacher, who died a few weeks ago, all her cash Is to be divided equally between her sister, Catherine S. Tracey, and her brother, Ernest C. Tracey. Baltimore, Md. Her Jewelry she disposed of among her relatives, and the residue of her estate, which consisted of her personal effects, she gives, to her brother, who, she says, he knowing her desires, will distribute them to friends and relatives as keepsakes.

 

Ref:

29 February 1896 Indianapolis Journal (Indiana)

2 September 1897 The San Francisco call (California)

26 August 1900 New-York tribune (New York)

2 Sept 1900 The St. Paul Globe (Minnesota)

15 Oktober 1901 Nordiskt Musikblad. Stockholm (Sweden)

April 01, 1913 Omaha daily bee (Nebraska)

 

 

 

3.2 Charles Tracey (General), son of John Tracey, was born at No. 757 Broadway, Albany, New York, May 27, 1847, died in the same city, March 24, 1905. He attended primary schools, and then entered the Boys' Academy, where he was graduated in the class of 1866. He had a natural aptitude for military drill and was major of the cadet battalion. In 1866 he went abroad, visited the Holy Land, and remained in Europe some time, and during the period enlisted and served two years in the Pontifical Zouaves, returning home in 1869. In 1870 he went to Rome and took part in the siege of that city against the king's forces. He was captured and held a prisoner for a time. He returned to New York City and engaged in business. He there organized the Catholic Union, which in a short time had a membership of over one hundred thousand, and became its first secretary. He then returned to Albany, which was ever after his home. After returning from his military career in Rome, Pope Pius IX, conferred upon him the order of St. Gregory the Great with the rank and title of Chevalier.

 

18 October 1870 (FJ) Journal of a Pontifical Zouave

Keyes O'Clery...I was accosted on the steps of the Orlando by my friend Mr. Charles Tracey, of Albany, who served with me in the Zouaves in 1867, and had just come all the way from New York to take his place again at the post of danger...We left Rome...On the following day Colonel De Charette invited me in company with Captain D'Arcy and Mr. Tracey to go on board the French frigate L'Orinoque, which had arrived to take off the French Zouaves to Marseilles...

 

His life from this time was devoted to the public service, being elected Congressman four times. He was an unwavering Democrat, and first held several entirely honorary offices. He was on the staff of Governor Tilden with the rank of colonel, and under Governor Robinson was commissary-general. In 1887 he was nominated and elected to congress to fill a vacancy. He was elected by the large majority of 1,659 over Hon. John M. Bailey, the popular republican candidate. He at once took a leading position in the house, and the first fruit of his labor was the bill for "the continuance of the manufacture of large cannon at Watervliet." In September the appropriation for the Watervliet gun factory was passed and signed by President Cleveland. In 1888 he was renominated and elected for a second congressional term. On the occasion of his re-nomination the Albany Morning Express (rep.) very generously remarked: "Gen. Tracey is young, energetic, intelligent, with plenty of leisure for his public duties, and the tastes which lead him to enjoy their punctilious discharge." Gen. Tracey was elected over his political opponent, Moses V. Dodge of this city, by a majority of 2,306. He served that term with especial credit and benefit to his district. He introduced and forced to passage many important measures, one of which was "to enforce the eight-hour law on government premises." So well was his work appreciated that in 1890 he was again elected to congress. He was elected over Mr. A. McD. Shoemaker, the republican nominee, by the magnificent majority of 5,078. He was especially honored by President Cleveland, who also tendered him a diplomatic position as minister abroad, which he declined. He was his spokesman on the floor of the house. During the presidential campaign of 1896 he was especially conspicuous, serving as the New York member of the Democratic National Committee of the sound money wing of his party. He rounded out his last congressional term full of honors, leaving a record without a stain, and at the time of his death was the national chairman of the Gold Democratic party. He took strong ground on sound money, tariff and labor questions. He was quiet, unassuming in manner, sunny in disposition, firm in his opinions, an ideal, true and courageous standard bearer.

 

He held many positions of honor and trust outside of his political ones. General Tracey was actively identified with many business and other institutions of Albany.  He was elected a trustee of St. Agnes Cemetery Association in 1875 to fill the vacancy caused by the death of his father. Since its organization in 1886 he has been president of the Columbia Distilling Company, which he had managed for ten years previously, and which was founded by his father in 1838. For nineteen years he was a trustee of the Albany Savings Bank, as was his father; was a director for fifteen years of the National Commercial bank; He was also vice-president of the Consolidated Car Heating Company of Albany, a life member of the Burgesses Corps, and a member of the Catholic Union, the Fort Orange and Albany Clubs, the Albany Press Club, the Dongan Club, and the Manhattan and Reform Clubs of New York city. He was trustee of the Boys' Academy; St. Agnes cemetery; manager of St. Peter's hospital, trustee of the House of Refuge, at Hudson, appointed by Governor Cleveland and reappointed by Governor Hill. He was a Catholic in religion, and when he was on his deathbed, Pope Pius X cabled the papal benediction, an honour conferred on prelates of the church. The beauty and purity of his life is thus expressed by a friend:

 

 

"He kept the faith, he chose the purer thought,
Upheld the truth and spoke with cleanly lips,
Untarnished walked the halls where men are bought
And served his country more than politics.
Tol'rant of weakness in his fellowmen,
Impatient only of the gross and vile,
His life was plotted on a noble plan,
He viewed the future with a trustful smile.
Gentle and true he leaves an honored name
More lasting in the hearts of friends than fame."

 

  

 

In 1883 General Tracey married Hermine, daughter of Colonel Duchesnay, of Montreal. They were the parents of four children, Marie T., Charles jr, Philip D., John and James (deceased) (1897).

 

He was buried in St. Agnes Cemetery, Albany. His tombstone lists his service in the Zouaves, his Knighthood of St. George and his Congressional service.

 

Albany Evening Journal 1905

http://pre-prowhiskeymen.blogspot.ie/2011/07/charles-tracey-mixing-politics-with.html

 

3.3 Eliza Tracey (Sister), daughter of John Tracey, was a member of the Franciscan Order, in which she has taken the name of Sister Ambrosia and was in 1911 Mother Superior in charge of St. James' Hospital, Newark, New Jersey.

 

3.4 James Francis Tracey (Judge), (1854-1925) youngest son of John Tracey, was born in Albany, New York, May 30, 1854. He was for four years a student at the Boys' Academy, and toured Europe for two years as part of his preparatory course. He entered on his return Georgetown University, where he was graduated A. B., class of 1874. He was graduated LL.B. from the Albany Law School, and was admitted to the New York bar in 1875. He studied in the office of M. T. and L. G. Hun, and in 1882 formed a partnership with James Fenimore Cooper, and his father, the late Paul Fenimore Cooper, who was senior counsel, under the firm name of Tracey & Cooper, which continued until 1893. In that year Albert Rathbone was admitted, and the firm became Tracey, Cooper & Rathbone, continuing until Mr. Rathbone's removal to New York City, when he withdrew. His place was taken by Frederick Townsend, the firm now being Tracey, Cooper & Townsend, conducting a general legal business. Mr. Tracey served as state examiner of corporations under John Bigelow when secretary of state, and was lecturer on the law of corporations at Albany Law School for fifteen years. From 1884 to 1886 he served as president of the Young Men's Democratic Club of Albany, which did effective work towards securing for Grover Cleveland the support of the party organization and in promoting his nomination. In 1905 President Roosevelt appointed him associate justice of the supreme court of the Philippine Islands, and he took up his temporary residence in Manila. On January 8, 1908, the president sent his name to the United States senate as member of the Philippine commission with portfolio as minister of finance and justice. This appointment he declined, and on February 1, 1909, resigned from the insular service, and, returning to Albany, resumed practice of the law with his old firm. He is connected with various Catholic charities, and belongs to the Cathedral congregation. In politics he is a Democrat, and at times has taken an active part in political movements, but has never been a candidate for political office. He belongs to the Fort Orange, University and Country clubs of Albany; the University and the Catholic of New York City, and the University of Manila. In 1910 he received the degree LL. D. from his alma mater, Georgetown University.

 

Judge Tracey married on May 10, 1893, Lucianne Bossé, of Quebec, Canada, daughter of Joseph G. Bossé, judge of the Court of Queens Bench (Court of Appeals), and his wife, Amelie de Salaberry, of an old French family which yet retains its ancestral seats upon the Loire, and at St. Jean Pied du Port in the Pyrenees. She is a great-granddaughter of Colonel de Salaberry, who commanded the British and Canadians at the battle of Chateaugay in 1812, when the Americans were defeated. Judge James F. and Lucianne (Bossé) Tracey have one son, Walter aged sixteen years. (1891)

 

Pamphlet: Catholic Union of the City of Albany, address of James F. Tracey (out-going president), delivered Tuesday, July 7th, 1891

 

Ref:

 

Noted living Albanians and state officials. A series of biographical sketches. (1891).

Cooney, Myron A., (1899) St. Agnes' cemetery; its past and present associations; Albany.

Parker, Amasa J. (1897). Landmarks of Albany County, New York. D. Mason & Co., Syracuse NY.

Reynolds, Cuyler ed. (1911) Hudson-Mohaw Genealogical and Family Memoirs. Lewis Historical Publishing Company, Vol. I pp.255-7

 

 

 

 

1869 Boston commercial directory

Pilot, Volume 36, Number 14, 5 April 1873.jpg

5 April 1873 Pilot (Boston)

 

 

Gazetteer and business directory of Albany & Schenectady Co., N.Y., for 1870-71 / compiled and published by Hamilton Child.

City of Albany

Tracey, Chas., (John  Tracey A Co.)

Tracey, J. Jr (John  Tracey A Co.)

Tracey, John & Co. (J. Tracey Jr and Chas. Tracey) distillers and rectifiers, 20 and 22 State, 182 and 184 Pearl, and 85 Broadway.

Tracy, Eliza, ladies' nurse, 87 Fayette.

Tracy, Maurice, meat market, 192 Orange.

Gazetteer of Towns

"Section 1. The territory within the following limits shall constitute the City of Cohoes : Commencing at a point in the center of the south branch of the Mohawk River, in the town of Watervliet and county of Albany, immediately east of the south line of the farm owned by Cornelius L. Tracy and Sarah M. Gould;...

 

 

 

 

 

 Various Tracey Records for Albany NY

http://www.connorsgenealogy.com/Albany/

 

Carlow

 

Margaret Tracey (single)

Birth Date: 4 Dec 1884 [1885? State Reg]

Birth Place: Co Carlow, Ireland

Age: 37

Residence: Brooklyn, New York & Mass for 21 years

Passport Issue Date: 1 Nov 1922

Father Name: James Tracey

Father's Birth Location: Ireland

Father's Residence: Deceased

Emigrated October 1st 1901

Neutralised 7th June 1921 Albany

 

1892-1924 Ellis Island Arrivals

Bessie Tracey, Knocklmagad (Knocklonagad Carlow?) Ireland, 1913, 23 years, housemaid, b. Knocklimagad, father ??? Traceey, Knockl?agad, [Knockclonagad] Co. Carlow, to Albany

 

Cavan

 

December 4, 1843 (FJ) Repeal in America

Albany, NY...subscription announced...Keran Tracey...Cavan...[or Tipperary]

 

Cork

 

Ellen Archdeacon 27 Apr 1892 Albany New York USA, died Fermoy Cork, to James F Tracey, Councellor at Law, Albany, the surviving executor

 

MISSING ADVERTISMENTS NORTH AMERICA

Name of Missing

Home county

Arrival

AD Date

SEEKER

John Tracey

Youghal, Cork

New York City, Roundout NY

4/7/1846

Thomas Tracey (brother) 485 Broadway, Albany NY

1846 Boston Pilot

Of John Tracey, a native of Youghal, co. Cork, who sailed from Liverpool in April, 1836, and landed in New York. When last heard from was in Roundout, N. Y. Any information respecting him will be thankfully received by his brother, Thomas Tracey, No. 485 Broadway, Albany, N. Y.

 

Dublin

 

1855 Naturalization Declarations -  Rensselaer Co Justice Court, Troy NY

Christopher Tracy, aged 40, of Dublin. Entered USA Jun 1854, Resides Albany Co, Applied Jan 241855

 

 

Galway

 

Name of Missing

Home county

Arrival

AD Date

SEEKER

Thomas Tracy (capenter)

Kiltullagh, Galway

Albany, NY

3/5/1851

Dennis Gurley (nephew) Media Co., Lodi, OH

Contact: Mr. Wilson, Medina Co, Lodi, OH

1851 Boston Pilot

Of Thomas Tracy, native of parish Kiltulla, county Galway, (by trade a carpenter). When last heard of was in Albany, N. Y. He, or any one acquainted with his whereabouts, would confer a favor by writing to his nephew, Dennis Gurley, care of Mr. Winson, Lodi, Medina County, Ohio.

 

1852 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Wm Tracy, 30, b. Galway, left from Dublin, Albany Co Oct 23

 

Kildare

 

1864 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

John Tracy, 50, b. Kildare, left from Dublin, Albany Oct 24

 

Kilkenny

 

1836 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

John Tracy, 34, b. Kilkenny, left from Waterford, Albany Nov 7

 

1838 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Dennis Tracy, 27, b. Kilkenny, left from Waterford, Albany Nov 6

 

1849 Albany NY Naturisations

John Treacy, 30, Co Kilkenny, Liverpool, Albany, Apr 3

 

1854 Naturalization Delarations Albany NY

Thomas Tracey, 36, Kilkenny, Waterford, Greenbush, Rens Co, Dec 11

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Tracy

Catherine

 

Kilkenny

Ireland

 

April 8, 1855

26 Years

 

 

Level

Drowned

107

 

Francis M. Tracy

One of the representative legists and jurists of Kenton county is Judge Francis Michael Tracy, who is now judge of the criminal and equity divisions of the circuit court of Kenton county, with residence and official headquarters in Covington. Judge Tracy was born in West Covington, this state, on the 5th of May, 1872, and is a son of Patrick and Julia (Aylward) Tracy, both of whom were born in Ireland. The father was reared and educated in the fair Emerald Isle, whence he came to America in 1840, at the age of twenty years. He first located on Prince Edward Island, Canada, where he remained two years, at the expiration of which he located in the city of Albany, New York, which continued to be his home until 1850, when he took up his residence in Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was successfully engaged in the grocery business for a number of years.

A History of Kentucky and Kentuckians: The Leaders and Representative Men by E. Polk Johnson, Lewis Publishing Company. 1912

 

Laois

 

1858 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Patrick Tracy, 30, b. Laois, left from Liverpool, Albany Mar 20

 

Leitrim

 

1850 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Andrew Tracey, 31, b. Co Leitrim Ireland, left from Liverpool, Albany Oct 26, 1850

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Tracy

Catherine

 

Leitrim

Ireland

Albany

September 15, 1849

65 years

 

 

E

Dysentery Death

46

 

Louth

 

13-10-1851 Western World, Liverpool to New York

Ellen Tracer, 18, F, Servant, Drogheda [Louth], to Albany

 

Offaly

 

1841 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

John Tracey, 31, b. Co Offaly, left from Dublin, Albany Aug 19 1841

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Tracy

Catherine

Andrew & Mary

Kings

Ireland

Albany

August 14, 1849

37 years

 

 

F

 

42

 

 

Tipperary

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Triacy

Edward

 

Tipperary

Ireland

Albany

October 26, 1847

30 years

 

 

L

 

17

 

1851 (January/February 1847) Enlistment for Mexican War

Andrew Treacey, 27, grey eyes, auburn?hair, ruddy complexion. 5'7", b. Tipperary Ireland, labourer, enlisted 1 Feb 1851 Albany, by Hayden, recruit, discharged 5 Mch 51 Regedect, discharged at Fort West? Ars? A recruit

 

1859 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Samuel Tracy, 24, b. Tipperary, left from Liverpool, Albany Oct 14

 

1860 Naturalization Delarations Albany NY

Kearon Tracey, 33, Tipperary, Liverpool, Coxsackie, Oct 17 [or Cavan]

 

 

Tyrone

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Tracey

Thomas

 

Tyrone

Ireland

Troy

 

42

 

 

 

 

2

 

Waterford

 

MISSING ADVERTISMENTS NORTH AMERICA

Name of Missing

Home county

Arrival

AD Date

SEEKER

Honora Treacy (Si Bridget)

Leamy Brien, Kilrossanty, Waterford

Quebec 1843

Ottawa(Bytown), ONT

Frankfort Co., KY

2/3/1850

Sylvester Treacy (brother), 4 Bleeker St, Albany, NY

1850 Boston Pilot

Of Bridget and Honora Treacy, natives of co. Waterford, parish Kilrosseuty [Kilrossanty], townland of Leamy Brien [Lemybrien, Stradbally]. The former was married to Stephen Murphy, blacksmith, of Glynnpatrick, who sailed from Liverpool to the United States in 1836 or 7. His wife, Bridget, left Ireland 2 or 3 years after in the barque Dispatch, of Waterford. Honora emigrated in the same vessel to Quebec in 1843. They met in Bytown, Upper Canada. It is supposed they are living at present in Frankfort County, Kentucky. Any information respecting them will be thankfully received by their brother, Sylvester Treacy, No. 4 Bleeker street, Albany, N. Y.

 

 

Westmeath

 

1859 Albany Co New York naturalization petitions for Irish born

Michael Tracy, 21, b. Westmeath, left from Liverpool, Albany Oct 29

 

1860 Naturalization Delarations Albany NY

Hugh Tracy, 60, Westmeath, Liverpool, Albany, Mar 30

 

1841- 1887 Interment Records St. John’s Cemetery, Albany, NY
http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~nytigs/StJohnsCemetery_Albany/StJohnsCemetery-Albany-Tom-Ty.htm

LAST NAME

FIRST NAME

NAMES OF PARENTS

COUNTY / CITY

NATION / STATE

DIED AT

DATE

AGE

LETTER

NO.

RANGE

REMARKS

PAGE

Tracey

Ann

 

Westmeath

Ireland

Albany

May 20, 1871

62 years

XVI

36

 

 

239

Tracey

Etta

Hugh & Hanora

Westmeath

Ireland

Albany

July 4, 1868

23 years

36

 XVI

 

 

217

Tracy

Hugh

 

Westmeath

Ireland

Albany

August 6, 1862

63 years

XVI

36

 

 

168

Tracy

John

 

Westmeath

Ireland

Albany

October 22, 1859

54 years

P

34

 

 

145

Tracy

William

 

Westmeath

Ireland

 

June 4, 1852

46 years

 

 

 

In Mr. Ledwick's Lot.

74

 

 

Wexford

 

Col. Thomas Henry Tracy, (1848-1925) M.C. Soc. C.E.,  D.L.S., P.L.S., O.L.S., M.B.C.A.M.E., M.E.I.C.

... Mr. Tracy went to Albany and joined George Durand at the Albany State Capital under Fuller & Laver, the architects. In 1871, after the great fire in Chicago, he went to that city and remained a year, when he returned to London, but later went to Albany, N. Y., and entered the office of the architect of the State House at that place...

 

 

 

 

 

Last update: 12 January 2017